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ALDERMAN LIBRARY 




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THE 

HISTORY OF AUGUSTA 

FIRST SETTLEMENTS 

AND 

EARLY DAYS AS A TOWN 

Including 

THE DIARY OF MRS. MARTHA MOORE BALLARD 
(1785 to 1812) 



By 
CHARLES ELVENTON NASH 



AUGUSTA. MAINE 

CHARLES E. NASH A SON 

1904 



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.K3N5 



Copyright, 1961 

by 
Edith L. Hary 



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CONTENTS 

PAGE 

PREFACE V 

CHAPTER 

I The Trip of the Popham Colonists up the 

Kennebec 1 

II The Pilgrim Fathers on the Kennebec 16 

III The Plymouth Company 56 

IV The Settlement of Hallowell 96 
V Hallowell a Township 106 

VI The Religious Annals of Hallowell 135 

VII The Town of Augusta 159 

VIII Obsequies of Washington 199 

IX The Purrinton Tragedy 208 

X Muster at Hinkley's Plains 215 

XI Mrs. Ballard's Diary (1785-1812) 229 

XII Daniel Cony's Diary (1808-1810) 465 

XIII Charles Hayden's Memoranda (1804-1816) 472 

XIV Henry Sewall's Diary (1783; 1830-1843) 476 

XV Town Orders, 1784-1795 518 

Selectmen's Orders (1806-1831) 539 

iii 



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IV CONTENTS. 

PAGE 
APPENDIX 

The Mission of the Assumption to the Country 
OF the Abnaquiois. (Jesuit Relations 1747, 
Chapter 10.) 547 

(Chapter VII, Relations of 1652.) 553 

The Good Disposition Which the Abnaquiois had 
FOR THE Faith of Jesus Christ. (Chapter VIII, 
Relations of 1652.) 558 

Intentions of Marriages (1763-1797) 564 

List of Marriages Solemnized in the Town of 
Hallo WELL Between the Years 1763 to 1796 578 

A Register of the Marks of Cattle, Sheep and 
Swine 584 

Deed op Sale of Martha Balston 588 

Plymouth Company's Deed to William Howard 590 

INDEX 595 



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PREFACE 



The publication of volume 1 of Nash's HISTORY OF AUGUSTA 
brings to partial fruition an immense project set in motion by Capt. 
Charles E. Nash when he turned his interest in local history to the 
task of bringing North's HISTORY OF AUGUSTA up-to-date. By 
1902 a newspaper noted that he had completed the work of gathering 
the materials for his History and it only remained to organize, con- 
dense and assemble them. This he accomplished. "When death 
came to him [February 25, 1904] he was putting through the press 
the masterpiece of his lifetime, 'The History of Augusta,' which will 
make two large octavo volumes, and when published will stand as an 
enduring monument to the memory of the author, who spent upon it 
several years of the best part of his life, much of the material for the 
history being evolved from laborious original investigations." (Daily 
Kennebec Journal, Feb. 26, 1904) 

Then for over half a century this great mass of unfolded, printed 
signatures was crated and stored. From time to time parts of the 
unprinted manuscript were typed by the staff of the Nash Press but 
ultimately these papers too were boxed for storage. In October 1958 
a new chain of events brought them to my attention. 

The bam at the Titus place in East Winthrop, where the huge 
wooden cases were stored, needed a new sill and the great weight of 
the boxes interfered with jacking up the building. Mrs. Danforth L. 
Nash, widow of the author's son, settled the problem by calling in 
the Maine State Library. The Library expressed some hesitation as 
hardly anyone now living had an idea of the significance of the con- 
tents of the boxes. It was finally agreed that they would be given 
room in the Library as my responsibility. Mrs. Nash later made a 
formal gift of all the parts and papers to me with the understanding 
that ten copies of any book made from them would be given to the 
State Library. 

It has taken some time to move ahead to publication. A laborious 
examination of all the boxes revealed that thirty-seven signatures 
were in print, nearly all of volume one. Searching through the papers 
brought to light the manuscript for the index of this portion. The 
prospects of making a book of this first volume seemed brighter. 
Even so it had become apparent at once that the material did not 



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VI PREFACE. 

take up the account from North; Capt. Nash had yielded to the 
temptation to begin at the beginning. Mrs. Ballard made the dif- 
ference. For the first time her diary, cited so frequently by other 
writers, appeared in substantially complete form. It is an important 
source of early Augusta history and an engaging account of the vicis- 
situdes of the practice of midwifery and the hazards of frontier living. 

Many friendly acts have helped the work along. Miss Bertha 
Metcalf Emerson of Pemaquid Point verified every index reference 
and made countless corrections. Carroll and Carrie Richards 
Creasey, present owners of the Nash Press, made the first tests to see 
if the sheets would still withstand machine folding and have con- 
tinued to give encouragement in the final stages of printing the index 
and front of the book. Some irregularities due to cutting the signa- 
tures by hand years ago are noticeable but are hardly a fated defect. 
The sheer physical labor of assembling the signatures into books has 
been shared by my sister Sarah and by Marilyn Cottle. Mrs. Dan- 
forth Nash's pleasure in the progress of the work has been an added 
incentive. 

Several important sources used in these pages were located by 
Capt. Nash in 1904. In 1961 three of them may be found in the 
Maine State Library. Dr. Mary Forrester Hobart presented the two 
volumes of the Ballard Diary in 1931. In 1958 the Augusta copy of 
the town clerks* records of ancient Hallowell, mentioned on page 115, 
was discovered in the Nash papers and at the request of the Augusta 
City Clerk was placed in the safe at the Library. Only this month 
inquiries located the "Winslow Plan" mentioned on page 99. Mrs. 
Samuel Titcomb had given it together with other maps to Henry F. 
Hill, Jr., local civil engineer, when the Titcomb Real Estate Associa- 
tion was sold. Now Mr. Hill has presented it to the Library. 

In Capt. Nash's valuable footnotes there are various references to 
the "Bibliography of Augusta," the "Bibliography of Hallowell," 
sketches of many families, and so on. All of these are a part of his 
projected second volume. Insofar as I am able, I shall be happy to 
try to check any reasonable inquiry which these references suggest. 

Charles E. Nash was an active force in the life of this area almost 
from the moment he walked from Norridgewock to Hallowell at the 
age of 14 and went to work as an apprentice in the office of the Hal- 
lowell Gazette. In five years he was a partner in the business. After 
distinguished service in the Civil War he returned and exercised in- 
creasing influence through the purchase of the Hallowell Gazette and 



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PREFACE. Vll 

then as part owner and business manager of the Kennebec Journal. 
In 1880 he purchased the printing business of Masters & Livermore 
of Hallowell, including the Maine Farmers* Almanac, and moved it 
to Augusta. By June of 1883 he built the building still occupied by 
the Nash Press. His civic activities were legion. His service as a 
member of the board of directors of the school district was honored in 
the naming of the Nash School; he played a prime part in securing 
funds for the building of the Lithgow Library ; he served as President 
of the City Council in 1873 and as Mayor in 1876, 1877, 1878, and 
1879; he was an organizer and patron of the Kennebec Historical 
Society. At the time of the "count-out" in 1880, Gen. Chamberlain 
called him to command the guard at the State House. For all of 
these honorable services the City of Augusta has long been in his 
debt and has claimed him with pride. With the publication of this 
first part of his HISTORY OF AUGUSTA he lays a new claim to the 
affection and thanks of its citizens. 

Edith L. Hary 

2 Pleasant Street 
Hallowell, Maine 

November, 1961 



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HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE TRIP OF THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP 
THE KENNEBEC. 

The river Kennebec has the historical distinction of being the 
plftce chosen for one of the two earliest English towns on this 
continent. The Virginia colony under the patronage of the 
London Company began its settlement at Jamestown in May, 
1607. The vessels of George Popham, groping their way by 
the reefs and headlands of Pemaquid and Sagadahoc, entered 
the tranquil haven of Atkins' Bay in mid-August, three months 
later. There, sea-weaiy, the adventurers landed, and for the 
first time European feet trampled the ban*en sands of the minia- 
ture desert of the peninsula of Sabino. 

The mission of the Popham colonists was to plant a town and 
establish unequivocal possession of the country. It was the 
physical, formal act of creating New England into a political 
appanage of the English crown. New France already existed 
inchoately by the patent to De Monts of the country of Acadia, 
and the Quinibequi had been explored by Frenchmen up to 
Men*ymeeting Bay ; while on the bank of the latter De Monts 
and Champlain had solemnly erected the christian cross sur- 
mounted by the arms of their king. 

The six scores of men composing the Sagadahoc colony began 
immediately the work which they had crossed the ocean to do. 
Climbing the elevation which forms the northerly foot-terrace of 
Sabino Head, they cut down an acre of the stunted forest and 



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2 HIBTORT OF AUOU8TA. 

built in the clearing a military cantonment, atockaded, and armed 
with guns — utilizing the precipitous and naked northeast spur 
of the granite hill for the citadel.^ While this important work 
was in progress, three boats' parties were led off by the officers to 
explore and examine the adjacent country. One party cruised 
along shore westwai*d through Casco bay ; another sailed easterly 
across Boothbay harbor to Pemaquid ; and a third rowed up the 
Kennebec as far as the depth of water would allow their boat to 
ascend. This last excursion is the only one that is of special 
interest now. 

Happily, a i*elation of the principal incidents of the up river 
trip was written by one of the participants— probably by the 
clerical Richard Seymour, the chaplain of the colony. It shows 
plainly that the route of the expedition was past the site of the 
present city of Augusta and continued some distance beyond. 
The narrative begins at the close of the second day^s pi*ogress, 
when the party went ashore and bivouacked on an open plot of 
ground of such fertility and excellence as to move the chronicler 
to mention its quality, so great in contrast with the meagre soil 
and abounding ledges of the coast. It was a river intervale, 
and to the visitors a cheering oasis in the midst of the depressing 
immensity of the forest which they had entered. The narrative, 
adapted by Strachey from the papers of the Popham colony, 
runs thus : 

[September] 28.' Captain OUbert, accompanied with nineteen 

others departed in his shallop, to goe for the head of the river of Sachadehoc. 
They sayled all this daye, and the 24th the like, nntill six of the clock in the 
aftemoone, when they landed on the river's side, where they found a champion 
land [camping ground] and very fertile, where they remayned all that night. 

25. In the morning they departed fTom thence and sayled up the river and 
came to a flatt low island where ys a great cataract or downfall of water, 
which runneth by both sides of this island very shold and swift. In this island 
they found great store of grapes, both redd and white ; good hopps, as also 
efaiballs [a small kind of onion] and garlike ; they haled their boat with a strong 

1 OeneslB of the United States, by Alex- ian Calendar. The trne date of the de- 

ander Brown, D. C. L. The Site of Fort portnre from Fort St. George was October 

St. George, by W. Scott Hill, M. D., a pa^ dd. The New Style, which had been pro- 

per read July 23, 1891, before the Kennebec mnlgated by Gregory XIII, twenty-five 

Natural History and Antiqnarian Society. years before, was not adopted by England 

s These dates are of the Old Style or Jul- until 1751. 



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TRIP OF THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. 3 

rope throagh this downfall perforce, and went neere a league ftirther up, and 
here they lay all night ; and in the first of the night there called certaine sal- 
vages on the fhrther side of the river unto them in broken English; they an- 
sweared them againe and parted [talked] long with them, when towards 
morning they departed. 

26. In the morning there came a canoa unto them, and in her a sagamo and 
four salvages, some of those which spoke to them the night before. The saga- 
mo called his name Sebenoa, and told us how he was the lord of Sachadehoc. 
They entertayned him ft'lendly, and took him into their boat and presented 
[him] with some triffling things which he accepted ; ho wbeyt, he desired some 
one of our men to be put into his canoa as a pawne of his safety, whereupon 
Captain Gilbert sent in a man of his, when presently the canoa rowed away 
from them with all the speed they could make up the river. They followed 
with the shallop, having great care that the sagamo shoul4 not leape over- 
board. The canoa quickly rowed Arom them and landed, and the men made 
to their bowses, being neere a league on the land from the river's side, and 
carried our man with them. The shallop making good waye, at length came 
to another downefall, which was so shallowe and soe swift, that by no meanes 
they could pass any ftirther, for which, Captain Gilbert, with nine others, 
landed and took their fore, the salvadge sagamo, with them, and went in 
search after those other salvages, whose bowses, the sagamo told Captain 
Gilbert were not farr off; and after a good tedious march, they came indeed at 
length unto those salvages' bowses wheere found neere fifty able men very 
strong and tall, such as their like before they had not scene ; all newly painted 
and armed with their bowes and arrowes. Ho wbeyt, after that the sagamo 
had talked with them, they delivered back again the man, and used all the rest 
Tery ft-iendly, as did ours the like by them, who showed them their comodi ties 
of beads, knives, and some copper, of which they seemed very fond ; and by 
waye of trade, made shew that they would come downe to the boat and there 
bring such things as they had to exchange them for ours. Soe Captain Gilbert 
departed from them, and within half an howre after he had gotten to his boat, 
there came three canoas down unto them, and in them sixteen salvages, and 
brought with them some tobacco and certayne small skynes, which were of 
no value ; which Captain Gilbert perceaving, and that they had nothing ells 
wherewith to trade, he caused all his men to come abourd, and as he would 
have putt ft'om the shore ; the salvadges perceiving so much, subtilely devised 
how they might put out the tier in the shallop, by which meanes they sawe they 
should be ft*ee flrom the danger of our men's pieces [match-locks], and to per- 
forme the same, one of the salvadges came into the shallop and taking the fler 
brand which one of our company held in his hand thereby to light the matches, 
as if he would light a pipe of tobacco, as soon as he had gotten yt into his haud 
he presently threw it into the water, and leaped out of the shallop. Captain Gil- 
bert seeing that, suddenly commanded his men to betake them to their mus- 
ketts and the targettiers too, ft*om the head of the boat, and bad one of the 
men before, with his targett [shield] on his arme, to stepp on the shore for 
more fler ; the salvages resisted him and would not suffer him to take any, and 
some others holding fast the boat roap that the shallop could not putt off. 
Captain Gilbert caused the musquettiers to present [aim] their peeces, the 



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4 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

which, the salvages seeing, presently let go the boatroap and betook them to 
their bowes and arrowes, and ran Into the bushes, nocking their arrows, but 
did not shoot neither did oars at them. So the shallop departed ftrom them to 
the ftirther side of the river, where one of the canoas came unto them, and 
would have excused the fault of the others. Captain Gilbert made shew as if 
he were still fHends, and entertayned them klndlye and soe left them, return- 
ing to the place where he had lodged the night before^ and there came to an 
anchor for that night. The head of the river standeth in 45 degrees' and odd 
mynutts. Upon the continent they found aboundance of spruse trees such as 
are able to maast the greatest ship his majestic hath, and many other trees, 
oke, walnutt, pineaple ; fish, aboundance ; great store of grapes, hopps, chl- 
balls, also they found certain codds [pods] in which they supposed the cotton 
wooU to grow, and also upon the banks many shells of pearle. 

27. Here they set up a crosse, and then returned homeward, in the way 
seeking the by river of some note called Sasanoa. This daye and the next they 
sought yt, when the weather turned fowle and fdll of fog and raine, they made 
all hast to the fort before which, the 29th, they arrived.^ 

A fragment of the original manuscript from which a portion 

of the foregoing account is a condensation, reads as follows : 

"The 25tih belnge ft*ydaye early in the momynge we depted [departed] from 
hence [the second night's camping-place] & sallied up the ryver about eight 
Leags farther untU we cam unto an Illand being Lo Land & flatt at this Illand 
ys a great downfall of wattr the wch runeth by both sydes of the Illand very 
swyfte & shallow in this Illand we found greatt store of grapes exceeding good 
& sweett of to sorts both red butt the on of them ys a marvellous deepe red 
by both the syds of this ryver the grapes grow In aboundance & allso very good 
Hoppes & also CheboUs & garleck and for the goodnesses of the Land ytt doth 
so far abound [is so productive] that I cannot allmost expresse the sam hear 
we all went ashore & wth a strong Rope made fast to our bott & on man In her 
to gyde her aggainst the swyft stream we pluckt her up throwe ytt pforce 
[perforce] after we had past this down-Fall we all went into our bott again & 
rowed near a Leage farther up into the ryver & night belnge at hand we hear 
stayed all nyght & in the fjrrst of the night about ten of the clock thear cam on 
the farther syd of the ryver sartaln salvages callinge unto us in broken inglyshe 
we answered them aggaln so for this time they depted. The 26th belnge Sat- 
terdaye thear cam a canoa unto us & in hear fower salvages those that had 
spoken unto us in the nyght beffore his name that came unto us ys Sabenoa he 
macks hemselffe unto us to be Lord of the ryver of Sagadehoc."* 

« The statement that the latitude of the « Historie of Travaile into Virginia. By 

highest point attained was above 45° (which William Strachey, Oent. Me. Hist. Soc. 

wonld carry it considerably beyond Carra- Coll., First series, Vol. III. 

tank falls in Solon) was either a gness ^ Lambeth Palace MS. disooveied by the 

based on inexact observation or an inten- Rev. B. F. DeCosta, 1875-6. See "The 

tlonal exaggeration (of abont one degree) Sagadahoc Colony, comprising the Rela- 

to deceive the French for political reasons, tion of a Voyage into New England ; with 

or impress the patrons of the colony with an introdnction and notes by the Rev. Hen- 

the extent of the exploration. ry 0. Thayer, A. M. Printed for the Gor- 



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TRIP OF THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEO. 5 

It is very probable that this was the first attempt by a com- 
pany of white men to penetrate any considerable distance into 
the interior of the territory of Maine. Certainly no account 
of any earlier similar visit has l>een transmitted to us. Since 
the cruiRes of the Cabots, father and sons, from Labrador to 
Cape Hatteras (1497-1498), which laid the foundation of the 
claim of the £nglish crown to a possession in America, until 
the landing of George Popham with his colony at Sabino, an 
innumerable procession of adventurers — English, French, Span- 
ish, Portuguese, Dutch — had touched the continent, and often- 
times tarried briefly on the coast, but nobody, so far as we 
know, had ever ventured so far inland on a northern river as 
Captain Gilbert and his party on the evening of their third day 
from the foit. 

After studious reading, it is not diflScult to recognize in the 
above description the locality of the terminus of Captain Gil- 
bert's expedition. A few facts make the identification complete, 
and are sufficient to set at rest finally all doubts if any still exist 
in the minds of inquirers on the subject.^ 

While the Kennebec continues to flow in its old channel from 
the gi-eat reservoir in the still continuing wilderness of Moose- 
head Lake, its impetuosity above the ocean tides has been 
curbed in many places by the works of man, and many of its 
ancient features entirely transformed. When Captain Gilbert 
sat in his long-boat and his sturdy mariners impelled it against 
the current of the river, three centuries ago, the scene which 

ges Society, Portland, 1892." Mr. Thayer cataract and anchored a league above it 

aaya **thi8 [Ciuhnoc] Island precisely meets before night. If miles are snbstitnted for 

the reqnirements [of the narratiye] and leagues there is less difflcolty in nnder- 

disdoses beyond qnestion the place reached standing the statement, 

by the party.** Some of the distances giv- s A theory was once adyanced l^ an able 

en by the journal of the Popham colony are stndent of Maine history that it was the 

especially puzzling and incomprehensible. Androscoggin which Captain Gilbert as- 

For instance, the distance sailed before cended, bnt it meets many obstacles in Stra- 

ooming to the cataract on the third day of chey*s aoconnt. The Kennebec theory 

the trip is stated as eight leagues. That is meets with f^w difficulties. See Remarks 

nearly one-half the distance from the cata- on Weymouth's Voyage, by John McKeen, 

ract to the sea, and could not well have been Vol. V, Me. Hist. Soc. Coll. ; Rev. Wm. S. 

accomplished, even with wind and tide Bartlett, same series, Vol. Ill; Wm. B. 

favoring, soon enough to have passed the Lapham in Kennebec Journal, Dec. 1889. 



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6 HISTOBT OF AUGUSTA. 

his eyes beheld was one of wild savagery. No undulating land- 
scapes with rounded hills and curving valleys were in view ; 
these were hid by the interminable forest, solemn and black with 
giant pines and hemlocks and spruces, crowding the under- 
growths of bushes and brambles to the water's edge. Silently 
wandered or lurked in leafy recesses the numerous fauna of the 
region, as yet unlisted by the naturalist and unstartled by the 
huntsman's rifle. League after league, past promontory and 
cape and bend, through reach and narrows and bay, and by the 
mouths of nameless rivers and streams, the clumsy shallop sailed 
northward from solitude to solitude. The sites of future cities 
were undistinguished in the woody maze. Nature — prodigal, 
severe, majestic — reigned supreme. A bit of the New World — 
old in the centuries, yet fi'esh and fair and excellent — all gor- 
geous in autumnal foliage tints, was opening before the antique 
prow of the venturous stranger boatmen. 

There was no incident of the voyage that seemed to the scribe 
worthy of i-ecoixi until the evening of the second day. What is 
now known as the ancient Sagadahoc section of the river was 
ascended without any chronicled observation. De Monts and 
Champlain,^ two years before, had entered the Kennebec from 
the Sheepscot by way of the Sasanoa or " back river,'* and had 
set up a cross of discovery and possession at Merrymeeting bay 
where their reconnoissance in that direction ended. There is 
no indication that the Popham colonists knew specially this fact. 
Evidently no sign or trace of the Frenchmen's visit was visible 
or noticed by Captain Gilbert. Into this bay Cbamplain de- 
scribes the Quinnibequy as coming from the northeast, vaguely 
confounding the eastern branch by Swan island with the Eastern 
river which there joins it. From the isles and islets and cur- 
rents at the outlet of the bay of the mingling rivei-s,® Captain 
Gilbert steered his boat into Champlain's upper Quinnibequy. 

7 Chftmplaiii*B Voyages. See John Mar- of Maine. Many other names which he 

shall Brown in Me; Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. gave became permanent, 
yil, 1876. Champlain was Geographer "The Kennebec, Androscoggin, Abaga- 

Boyal with De Mont*s colony at St. Croix, dasset, Cathance, Whiskesg and Mnddy 

1604-5. He gave Kennebec river its name. rivers. The aboriginal name of Meny- 

His was the earliest detail map of the coast meeting bay was Qnabacook. 



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TRIP OF THE FOPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. 7 

It is not surprising that the early English traders and settlers 
looked upon the Sagadahoc and the Kennebec as two rivers and 
entitled to the different names which they received. The great 
geological and topographical contrasts between the country 
below Merrymeeting bay and that above it are apparent to even 
the cursory observer. In the comparatively recent diluvial age 
the lower Kennebec was an arm of the ocean rather than a river, 
and it still retains many marine characteristics ; while above 
Abagadasset Point the sea-shore features i*apidly disappear. 
The pronounced transition in both water and land at this point 
explains the practice of the pioneer settlers in using two names 
for the Kennebec river — Kennebec above Abagadasset Point and 
Sagadahoc below to the sea. 

Captain Gilbert, entering the Kennebec from its expansive 
inland estuary, was upon waters that never before had been 
rippled by the dip of the white man's oars. His route hence- 
forth was beyond the farthest bound set up by De Monts and 
Champlain and into a country of deep, mellow, unstubbom soil, 
fit for human occupancy and habitation. The solitary voyagers 
at the close of day espied the wonder of an open field by the 
river, and there lodged for the night. This was one of the allu- 
vial intervales, arable but fallow, from which the natives had 
banished the trespassing forest by occasional cultivation and 
planting. There were many such treeless spots between Cob- 
bosseecontee and Ticonic when the great migration of settlers 
to the Kennebec began a century and a half later ; some of the 
pioneers acconlingly found portions of their land already cleared 
when they arrived. The precise place where the Popham voya- 
gers pulled their boat ashore and encamped on the mellow turf 
beneath the stars is unknown, and speculation concerning it 
would be idle ; perhaps the devastation of the river's Ij^anks by 
the floods of three centuries has washed it entirely away. It 
was probably somewhere between the mouths of the Worromon- 
togus (in Randolph) and the Kedumcook (in Hallowell). Up 
to this point the itinerary of the trip is too indefinite to warrant 
much conjecture. 

The first recorded incident of the following day was the en- 



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8 HISTORT OP AUGUSTA. 

counter with " a great cataract or downfall of water,'* which ran 
shoaly by both sides of a flat low island ; where the boat was 
lightened by the landing of its occupants and towed by the 
sailors past the difficulty. The botanist officially examined the 
flora of the island and with some hyperbole enumerated what he 
there found. Ee-embarking above the rapids the party pro- 
ceeded about a league beyond, and there ended the day's jour- 
ney. No Indian inhabitants of the river had yet been seen ; yet 
these, ever watchful for their enemy and waiy of the stranger, 
were early aware of this daring approach of the suspicious 
pale-faces, and runners had been sent to warn the tribe and as- 
semble the wai'riors. Relieved from danger by sheltering 
darkness, the outguards and spies from bushy retreats on the 
shore challenged the wakeful boatmen to learn the purpose of 
their invasion and whether they came as friends or foes.® 

The long distance evening parley, in the jargon of broken 
languages, was mutually assuring of peace, and in the morning 
the chief of the tribe arrived and became the guest and willing 
hostage of his visitors ; pleased with petty gifts, and treated 
with mock royalty though under surveillance against escape, the 
dusky child of the woods thereafter accompanied the party to the 
end of its journey. 

After continuing the ascent of the river a few miles above the 
last night's anchorage, the laden shallop grounded in shallow and 
ra|3id water. It could go no farther ; this was the terminus of 
its upward voyage. At this place Captain Gilbert divided his 
company into two parties — one to accompany himself and Sebe- 
noa to the latter's village, and the other to guard the boat. The 
party of natives with one of Captain Gilbert's men had already 
led the way to the metropolis. The narrative describes graphi- 
cally what there transpired and likewise the dramatic and thrill- 
ing — almost tragical — parting of the savages and the Englishmen 

» Skeoowaroes, alias Sitwares, alias Skit- deserted to his tribe and kindred at Pema- 

warres, one of the captive Indians of Cap- quid before the colonists landed at Sabino. 

tain Weymonth (1604), was returned to The loss of Skeoowaroes was a great mis- 

his native country hy the Popham colony fortune to the colony — the first in its na- 

with the design that he should be required merons series. 
to serve it a« a guide and interpreter, but he 



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TRIP OP THE FOPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. d 

at the river's side. The scene exhibits the kind of fire-arm 
carried by the colonists. It was the rnde match-lock, which 
fired the powder by a burning fuse, and its use depended upon 
a supply of live coals or fire-brands constantly at hand. The 
savages craftily sought to extinguish the stock of precious fire in 
the boat and so render the white men's terrible and dreaded thun- 
der-makei's impotent. The incident proves that the Indians had 
already learned of the superiority of fire-arms over their own 
bows and arrows, and had become somewhat acquainted, either 
through experience or by hearsajs with the ways and wiles of 
the wondrous Europeans from beyond the rising sun. 

The day's labor had been hard and its events exciting to the 
explorers; having reached as they supposed the '* head of the 
river," they observed with particularity the nature and produc- 
tions of the country — ^the varieties of trees and plants and vege- 
tables native to the soil — ^the fishes and mollusks of the river — 
and reckoned approximately the latitude of the place. Finally 
they dropped their boat down stream to the spot from which 
they had started in the morning, and there spent a second night. 
The next day (Sunday, October 7, New Style) they constructed 
on the shore a wooden cross and there raised it in the names of 
the holy saviour and their earthly king James. Leaving in 
loneliness the rustic symbol of Christianity and of English sov- 
ereignty, the party, stalled on its return to Sabino. 

It remains to recite the reasons which compel the belief that 
Captain Gilbert's excursion to "the head of the river of Sachade- 
hoc" was up the Kennebec, and that he ascended to a point five 
or six miles above the present city of Augusta. The first 
strongly convincing if not conclusive fact is the " flatt low island'* 
dividing the river, where the current ran rapidly, and which 
was the first obstruction of the kind that had been met. This 
island was of such extent as to attract attention, and close exami- 
nation as to its productions — which were enumerated with a 
degree of exaggeration and inaccuracy not unusual to the early 
unscientific visitors to America. 

An island remarkably like the one described exi^tted at ancient 
Koussinok along the acclivity of the river which the building of 



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10 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

the Kennebec Dam now conceals. The early settlers of Augusta 
knew it familiarly before it had lost any of its primitive features, 
and while the description given in Captain Gill^ert's journal 
would aptly apply to it. It was represented as Cushnoc Island 
on John North's plan,^® drawn in 1751, and is still remembered 
by aged persons who have recollections of Cushnoc rapids prior 
to the time when the dam was built at that place (in 1836-7). 
The island has been described by those who saw it as low and 
flat, resembling in horizontal contour an elongated and nan*ow 
snow-shoe, the fore part bi*easting the current of the river. In 
composition it did not seem to belong to the local family of river 
islands and adjacent intervales built by alluvial settlings of sands 
and silt in the lacustrine era before the present channel of the 
river had been scooped out — but it consisted of coarse and heavy 
gravel and heterogeneous pebbles — a diluvial collection from 
the great glacial river that created the principal kame system of 
the Kennebec valley. The drift debris which compose the high 
banks of the river in the vicinity of both ends of the Kennebec 
dam and which are known as the gravel pits, had the same origin 
and belong to the same ice-river or kame system. 

A series of kames begins abruptly at Somerset Mills, and is a well-defined 
system soath to the head of Swan Island. Its coarse lies near the Kennebec, 
which it several times crosses. In Fairfield, WaterviUe and Gardiner it is for 
the most part on the western side of the river, in Vassalboro and Dresden on 
the eastern, while in Augusta and Hallowell it expanded into a series of paral- 
lel and interrupted ridges, a part of which lie on each side of the river. 
South of Dresden the system is represented by only a few occasional ridges, 
which thus for have been traced to Abagadasset Point in Merrymeeting bay. 
Probably the course of the system here followed the river, and the gravels 
have been in great part washed away. Many sections along the course of the 
kame show marine sands and clays overlying the kame. (The Kames of Maine. 
By George H. Stone. Proceedings of the Boston Society of Natural History, 
Vol. XX, March 8, 1880.) This kame may be traced by its fragments which 
lie like the disjointed remains of a territorial serpent along the course of the 
mighty glacial river. In Augusta it first appears near the Vassalboro line as 
knolls and old gravel pits by the side of the Maine Central Railroad, which 
there, for several miles, was built almost entirely of kame material. It next 
appears In the precipitous banks of gravel on the western side of the river — 
continuing with some interruptions nearly to the Kennebec Dam. The Ed- 

10 Captain John North's plan for the Ply- from the ocean to Ciulmoc. 
mouth Proprietors, delineating the lands 



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TRIP OF THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. 11 

wards Manofactaring Company's gravel pit is a spur of it. At that point it 
crossed the river, either expanding abnormnlly or separating into two short 
lateral branches, as is indicated by the composition of Cushnoc Island and of 
the diluvial mound between Riverside cemeteiy and the river. The next frag- 
ment abruptly appears on the western side of the river in the eastern face of 
the Crosby street terrace, and another one on Winthrop street near the Conrt 
House. It again reappears as the river bank opposit-e the Kennebec Arsenal, 
then again and agaii^ beside the railroad track, until once more it crosses the 
river and reappears in Chelsea at the Hallowell ferry. The material of this 
kame was especially usefhl in the construction of the railroad. Although this 
glacial river, flowing only in the melting seasons and for above the surface of 
the earth, had no connection with the genesis of the later terrestrial river, yet 
the accumulations in its bed, after they had sunk to the ground, may have 
caused slight local deflections of the original channel of the Kennebec. The 
westward bend near the Hallowell cemetery may be partly accounted for in 
this way. The noted *'Mile-rock," situated on the west bank opposite the 
Maine insane hospital, was knocked off some cliff and brought as a boulder 
trom the northward in the bosom of the same glacier and dropped where it 
lies — ^broken by its fSUl. 

At this point a portion of the kame, as in various other places, 
appears to have been deposited where the channel of a future 
river was to be. The island was about one-fourth of a mile long, 
varying in width between one hundred and two hundred feet. 
During the last years of its remembered existence the upper end 
was above water during the summer season, but a slight freshet 
would cntii*ely submerge it. A few stunted bushes and vines 
lived along the shores, shielding the banks from the action of 
the floods and retarding the progress of their dissolution. On 
the inshore or eastern side of the island the water was shallow, 
the bottom of the channel having been raised by washings from 
the adjacent shores. The main channel was on the western side, 
and here manifestly the Popham colonists towed their boat per- 
force. At this place — the old Cushnoc rapids — the natural 
declivity of the bed of the river, in the longitudinal distance of 
sixteen hundred and fifty feet, is two and forty-two one-hund- 
redths (2.42) feet. If this amount of fall is seemingly insuflS- 
cient to account for the importance and notoriety of these rapids 
it may be said that the bed of the river was rocky and the west- 
eiTi shore irregular and jagged. A projecting point of this 
shore, crowding into the channel, deflected the current easterly, 
while the head of the island opposite, dividing the water into 



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12 HISTORT OF AUGUSTA. 

two unequal streams, turned the larger one westwardly. Thus 
collected within narrow bounds the hurrying, eddying and noisy 
water formed the " great cataract or downfair — identical with 
the one mentioned in the Popham narrative. In the depths of 
the boiling water lay a ponderous boulder of many tons weight 
— brought from the northward and dropped there by the ancient 
glacier — which was a prominent feature of the rapids at some 
stages of the water. For many 3'ears, and until it was hidden 
by the transformation of Cushnoc rapids into a water-power 
pond," it was known by the people of Augusta as Coon's rock — 
in commemoration, according to tradition, of the fatal wrecking 
on its amphibious and treacherous shoulders of a pioneer hunter 
or settler. Cushnoc Island has likewise disappeared — not 
from sight merely, but from existence. The work of man has 
so re-modelled and altered the work of nature there that now no 
ancient feature of the river or shores may be seen. If Captain 
Glibert and his companions were to behold the spot again, there 
is nothing by which they could identify it as the scene of their 
visit. Their wild and foaming cataract has been tamed and 
tethered to factory wheels; the island which their log-book 
made historic has vanished like the lost Atlantis, but in another 
manner. It was shoveled into calls and wheelbarrows and 
dumped as ballast in the construction of the Kennebec dam — 
that is, so much of it was so utilized as was valuable for the pur- 
pose, and the rest has been washed away. The peregrinating 
colonists whose hobnailed shoes first tracked its gravelly shore 
could not in their most extravagant vision have dreamed of a 
better use for it. 

u Nathaniel Hawthorae, while the gaest red yards wide. Pntting my head out of the 

in Angnsta of Horatio Bridge, his ooUege window, I can see it flowing steadily along 

classmate and friend, got glimpses of Cnsh- straightway between wooded banks ; bnt ar- 

noc island from the Bridge homestead :— riving nearly opposite the honse, there is a 

''Maine, Jnly 5, 1837. Here I am, settled large and level sand island in the middle 

since night before last with B. [Bridge.] . of the stream, and jnst below the island 

. . . The honse is very pleasantly situa- the current is farther interrupted by the 

ted— half a mile distant from where the works of the mill-dam, which is perhaps 

town begins to be thickly settled, on a swell half finished Thursday, July 

of land, with the road running at a dis- 20th An island of gravel, long 

tance of fifty yards, and a grassy tract and and narrow, in the centre of the river." 

a gravel walk between. Beyond the road (Passages from American Note Books of 

rolls the Kennebec, here two or three hnnd- Nathaniel Hawthorne.) 



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TRIP OF THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. 13 

If the falls described wei'e the rapids of Cushnoc, it is easy 
to follow the movements of the party to the end of its joiiniey. 
About a league beyond the cataract the expedition came to 
anchorage and tarried for the night. The distance above the 
cataract shows that this was opposite the extensive intervale on 
the eastern side of the river, of which Gilley's Point is a part. 
There the savages first entered into communication with the 
visitors, cautiously making their approach under the cover of 
night, remembering the kidnapping of five of their rjice** by 
Captain Weymouth at Pemaquid three years before, and sensi- 
tively aware that to them the white man was dangerous. This 
was the locality where, two days later, the cross was erected and 
left standing as a solitaiy memorial of the discovery of the 
region by the subjects of King James I. This afterwards was 
the site of a wigwam village, and the place where Father Dru- 
illettes built his chapel for the Mission of the Assumption in 
1646. 

The next day, having fraternized with the natives and accom- 
panied by them, the colonists pushed their boat onward until it 
grounded in shallow rapids and could sail northward no farther. 
Then they went ashoi'e and tramped through the forest to the 
rendezvous of the painted warriors, who were on the alert to 
receive them. The belief is warranted — it being consistent with 
all the related facts and circumstances — that the boat was stopped 
along that acclivity of the river known as Bacon's rips — a sec- 
tion of the Kennebec where the total natural descent is a little 
more than twelve and one-half feet.^^ Those rips extended 
several miles between the Vassalboro and Sidney banks, and 
were a great obstacle to navigation before the raising and stag- 

^ Dehamda, Skitwazes, SMaenow, Abe- u Survey of the Kennebec river from 

remet, Taaqnantnm. (Briefie Narration, Bath to Skowhegan by Colonel Abert, in 

by Sir Ferdinando Gorges, London, 1668. 1826. The total descent of the river be- 

Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., First aeries. Vol. II.) tween the foot of Tioonic Falls and high 

Sassenow appears to have been a sagamore, tide at Aogusta is 36.10 feet. ''The stream 

and he is commemorated in the name of is slightly affected by the tide as far as 

the river Sasanoa. A sachem seems to have three miles above the bridge at Angnsta.** 

been considered only as a wise man, and a (Edward A. Kendall's travels in 1807-8, 

sagamore as a high legal magistrate of his Vol. III.) 
tribe. 



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14 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

nation of the water by the building of the dam six or seven miles 
below. The wearisome and distippointing foot journey through 
the woods may have been to the vicinity of the outlet of Webber 
pond — a secluded strategical place about a league from the 
river — between which and the latter was an aboriginal trail long 
preserved after the country had been settled and the Indians 
exterminated. 

This view of the direction and terminus of the Pophara explo- 
ration inland is unquestionably proved by the official narrative 
in connection with the otherwise known primeval features of the 
land and water at ancient Cushnoc and vicinity. The narrator's 
descriptions of the two rapids, the proximity of the emporium 
of a numerous tribe of Indians, and the time employed (seven 
days) from the beginning of the journey to the arrival back at 
the foil, are facts that point directly to the region of the Kenne- 
bec at Augusta and a few miles above, and to no other river. 

This reconnoissance, while barren of the hoped-for discovery 
of the precious metals or of any other sort of great riches, and 
of little if any geographical importance, was nevertheless of 
vast political — even of momentous international consequence. 
It was the perambulating and fixing, for the time being, of a 
boundary between France and England in the New World — 
between the undefined countries of Acadia and New England. 
The French had cruised over a portion of the same route, and 
the fleur de lis had fluttered over Merrymeetiug bay. Captain 
Gilbert supplanted it in a higher latitude by the cross of St. 
George. No French statesman ever afterwards presumed to 
pass this marker. During the next century and a half, while 
the western boundary of Acadia was often changing and French 
and English captains led their hostile files through forest, swamp 
and lonely fastness of the territory of Maine, no Bourbon or his 
ministers ever claimed sovereignty beyond the Kennebec. The 
Popham colony tentatively established a line that was success- 
fully defended in cabinet and in battle conflict, until a conquer- 
ing generation of Americans in another age, with another issue 
in debate, removed it to the St. Croix. Thus vanished the 
cherished western line of ancient Acadia, and the eastern 



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TRIP OP THE POPHAM COLONISTS UP THE KENNEBEC. 15 

boundary of Maine was established in harmony with the original 
territorial claim— contended for so passionately and so long by 
England and her foster colonies. 



Note. In 1611, Father Biard wrote : **We arrived at Kinibeqai [from Port 
Royal] at the end of October. Kinnlbeqai is a river near the Armouchlquois 
[Penobscot natives] forty-three and two-thirds degrees of elevation. . . . 
It has two months, tolerably large, at least two leagues distant ft*om each 
other ; also many islands which divide it. For the rest, though the river is 
large and beautifbl, we saw no good land. . . . It is said, however, that 
above, ftir Arom the sea, the land is very fine and the situation pleasant, and 
the people work there. We did not ascend more than three leagues."— (Rela- 
tion de la Nonvelle France. The Voyage to the Kennebec and the Return to 
Port Royal, by Father Pierre Biard, chap. XVIII, p. 86. Quebec ed. 1858.) 
This party entered the Kennebec at Sabino, and after inspecting the deserted 
Fort St. George, ascended the river as far as the Sasanoa or back river (oppo- 
site the site of the present city of Bath), and thence descended through the 
hell-gates to the Sheepscot. 



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CHAPTER n. 
THE PILGRIM FATHERS OK THE KENNEBEC. 

The history of the Kennebec valley is closely connected with 
the Pilgrim Fathers who landed from the Mayflower on Ply- 
month rock in December, 1620 ; and as it is the pleasure of the 
historical student to trace from the transactions and deeds of 
the past their unbroken sequence to succeeding ages, so it is 
ours to i-ecall the facts that make the capital of the State of 
Maine, and many of the other towns on the Kennebec river, the 
direct descendants of the first permanent colony of New 
England. 

Near the end of that first dreadful winter (March 16, 1621), 
at Plymouth, an uncouth savage came out of the depths of the 
forest to the little log hamlet on the hillside by the brook ; ^ he 
had a bow and two arrows, and though it was but the middle of 
March, his only clothing was a leather about his waist, with a 
fringe about a span long, or little more ; he was a tall, straight 
man, beardless, with long black hair cut only on his brows." 
(Bradford.) He walked gravely and unabashed into the midst 
of the astonished people, and tried to talk with them in his own 
language. Amid the jargon of his gutturals the wistful ears of 
the Pilgrims at last discerniBd the strange ejaculation, many 
times repeated — ''Welcome, Englishmen." It was Samoset, an 
Indian of the region of the Sagadahoc, who had been carried to 
Europe by some early explorer and afterwards returned un- 
harmed to his native wilderness, with kindly feelings towards 
the white race. This mysterious comer, so like an apparition 
from another world, was the first human being whom the Pil- 
grims had been able to meet since they left the shores of 
England. The lowly savage was an evangel to the despairing 
company. His friendly greeting was a good omen, and gave 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 17 

to the Pilgrims new courage to raeet the providences of the 
painfully unceitain future. Possibly to them the wilderness lost 
some of its harshness through the sympathetic touch of its 
untutored child. Samoset's visit seems to the finite mind a piv- 
otal event in the early life of the colony. His own lot had bred 
him to the art of living without the aids of civjlization, and his 
usefulness was invaluable to the inexperienced colonists. He 
introduced them to Squanto, the chief of the surrounding tribe, 
who showed them how to fish and hunt and glean food from both 
sea and land, until the corn which he taught them to plant had 
returned its increase. The name of Samoset will always be 
linked in history and song with the Pilgrim Fathers. 

But another infinitely far-reaching result came from the visit 
of Samoset. He told the Pilgrims that in the eastern country 
from whence he came there dwelt other pale-faces like them- 
selves; he disclosed to the colonists that they had English 
neighbors no farther away than Monchiggon (Monhegan). This 
knowledge was cherished as a solace by the Pilgrims during 
their early struggles for food sufficient to sustain life. "The 
first season's husbandry had been prosperous on a small scale ; 
the barley was ^indifierent good,' and there was a good return 
of indian corn." In the second year (1622) the crop proved 
scanty, says Edward Winslow, *" partly through weakness to 
tend it, for want of food ; . . . such was our state as in the 
morning we had often our food to seek for the day, yet per- 
formed the duties of our daily labors, to provide for aftertime ; 
when at some times in some seasons, at noon I have seen men 
stagger by reason of faintness for w^ant of food." In this state 
of famine bordering on starvation, the governor (Wm. Brad- 
ford) sent Edward Winslow — in a boat, perchance guided by 
Samoset — eastward to Monhegan and Damariscove, for food for 
the sufiering colony — where, says Winslow, '<we not only got 
a present supply, but also learned the way to these parts for our 
future benefit." 

It was this first hasty voyage to the coast of Maine that sug- 
gested to the sagacious Winslow the project of trade which the 
colony afterwards matured and found so profitable. He learned 



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18 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

the geography of the region, and probably met individjials of 
the tribes that had been bartering their furs for trifles with ad- 
venturers from Europe, for a score of years. No traffic was at 
this time begun, for the colonists in their destitution had noth- 
ing to sell. But after the harvest of 1625, there was for the 
first time plenty of food at Plymouth. The yield of corn 
especially had been good. The granary was overflowing, and 
the surplus hung in long yellow traces from the beams and raft- 
ers of the little hamlet. It was determined to offer some for 
sale to the natives, for the benefit of the colony which was 
heavily in debt to the capitalists in England who had advanced 
the money for the outfit of the Mayflower entciprise. Edvvard 
Winslow, who of all the company was endowed with the boldest 
spirit of enterprise and the most executive ability, was entrusted 
with the important venture. The names of his few companions 
have not been made known to u« — but Captain Myles Standish, 
around whom a poetic halo has been thrown by the genius of 
Longfellow was probably one of them, and very likely '"demure 
John Alden," also. The brief record says : 

After harvest this year [1625], they sent oat a boat's load of come, forty or 
fifty leagues to the eastward, at a river called Kennebeck ; it being one of 
those two shallops which their carpenter had bailt them ye year before, for 
bigger vessel they had none. They laid a deck over her midships, to keep ye 
corn dry, but the men were faine to stand it out in all weathers without shelter, 
and that time of year begins to grow tempestuous ; but God preserved them 
and gave them good success, for they brought home 700 pounds of beaver, 
besides some other fhrs, having little or nothing else but this corne which 
themselves had raised out of ye earth. This viage was made by Mr. Winslow 
and some of the old standards, for seamen they bad none. (Bradford.) 

This was the first recorded trading-voyage to the ** river called 
Kennebeck." The lower portion of the river had been visited 
by different French and English explorers since the beginning 
of the century, and the settlement of the Popham colony 
attempted (1G07) at its mouth ; but the rude home-made shallop 
from Plymouth, manned by a few colonial landsmen, was the 
first commercial craft that ever rounded Cape Sabino and bi-east- 
ed the current of the majestic and beautiful Kennebec. How 
far it ascended was not I'ecorded ; neither are we told of the 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 19 

tribes that flocked around it as it came to anchor near their wig- 
wam villages on the banks. 

In the words of the record, they ** came to a river called Ken- 
nebec." In 1625, and for many years before and after, the 
Kennebec was considered by the English as an inland river, 
whose mouth was at Merrymecting bay, where its waters, unit- 
ing with those of the Androscoggin, formed the river of Saga- 
dahoc. Captain John Smith refers (1614) to the Kennebec, 
Androscoggin and Sagadahoc as three different rivei-s. Ferdi- 
nando (son of Sir F. ) Gorges, in his description of New England 
(1658), alludes to the Kennebec as an inland river, in the sen- 
tence — •'along the sea to Sagadahoc and up the river thereof to 
Kynebequy river." Governor Sullivan, in his histoiy of the 
District of Maine, says : "From the Chops up to the head the 
river is called Kennebec ; below this it is called Sagadahoc." 
We know, therefore, that the Plymouth adventurers ascended 
the Sagadahoc to Merrymecting bay, and from there entered 
the Kennebec, to seek the encampments of the tribe that occu- 
pied the valley from Merrymecting bay to Moosehead lake. 
This was the most numerous and impoi1;ant of all the eastern 
tribes. It is not improbable that the Pilgrim traders urged their 
vessel with sail and oars from village to village as far up the 
river as the lowest rapids or head of keel-craft navigation, 
where, in the distant future, as a sequence of their voyage, the 
city of Augusta was to be. 

The record of this first trip up the Kennebec, so fruitful in its 
results, does not enable us to say anything about its details and 
incidents ; they are left wholly to conjecture apd fancy ; the 
actors were moi-e interested in selling their corn than careful in 
leaving an account of their voyage. We know with certainty, 
how^ever, that the simple and improvident natives gave to the 
visitors their accumulation of rich furs to the value of six or 
seven thousand dollars (measured by the standard of to-day), in 
exchange for a few bushels of corn to stay their hunger when 
the chase was barren or the fishing poor. 

The little shallop, with its lading from the wild-woods of the 
Kennebec, jailed back to New Plymouth, like The Argos 



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20 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

bearing the golden fleece. The voyage had been wonderfully 
successful. The outlay had been small and the income lai*ge. 
The hearts of the colonists were cheered ; they had discovered 
a river whose banks and tributaries were alive with beaver, 
marten and other fine-fur animals, and whose ample water would 
bear their vessels fifty miles inland — to the very metropolis of 
the large tribe that peacefully dominated the valley. The se- 
questered position of the Canibas or Kennebec tribe had saved 
it from the afflicting visits of the first exj^lorers and traders who 
raided the coast, like Weymouth the kidnapper (1606), and the 
more brutal Hunt (1614) ; the romantic John Smith tells us 
that, while cruising along the shores of New England (1614), 
he " got for trifles eleven thousand pounds of beaver skins, be- 
sides martens and otter, all amounting to the sum of fifteen 
hundred pounds," (more than $40,000 in the money of to-day.) 
By their frequent contact with such greedy voyagers from 
Europe the tribes whose home was near the sea had, in twenty 
j'ears, become impoverished of their collection of furs, and want 
and pestilence had followed as the I'esult of the white man's 
touch. Indeed, one whole tribe, the Wawenocks, whose domain 
comprised the territory between the Sagadahoc and Damariscotta 
rivers, seems to have nearly disappeared at the time of the Pil- 
grims' visit. But the larger Canibas tribe was reserved for a 
longer history and a more lingering fate. 

At the time of the Pilgrims' first visit, the Kennebec Indians 
had not been outraged by the pale-faces. We do not know that 
any European had sailed up to their territory since Captain 
Gilbert of the Popham colony made his reconnoissance to a 
village a few miles above the site of Augusta in 1607. When 
the Pilgrims followed the same route, eighteen years later, they 
found the natives entirely friendly and in possession of a large 
accumulation of furs with which they wrapped their bodies and 
carpeted their lodges. These robes of the wilderness, so much 
admired and so marketable in Europe, had escaped the covetous 
search of Smith and Hunt, and many nameless roving traders, 
and were in the order of Providence preserved for the pioneer 
colony of New England. The first cargo was. shipped to 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 21 

England, but disaster befell it ; the vessel was captained by a 
Spanish pirate, and so no profit in fact came to the colony from 
the '* 700 pounds of beaver, besides some other furs," that were 
the first fruits of the Kennebec venture. 

The Pilgrims, undaunted by aught we humanly call misfor- 
tunes, did not repine. The record says, the next year (1626) 
encouraged by their success they " planted largely and engaged 
in trade." ^ The colony had not yet passed its experimental 
era ; it had been at the point of starvation, and was now at the 
verge of financial bankruptcy. The disappointed English paii> 
ners, not having received any profits from the undeitaking which 
their money had promoted, were fretful and importunate. Amid 
its dismal environments, the colony seemed to be near its end. 
Only men of heroic mould would have sought to continue the 
struggle. At this juncture the Pilgrims in their brave faith 
determined to ask the grand-patentees in England to bestow 
upon them the exclusive benefit of the trade which they had 
opetied on the Kennebec. They believed that with the assistance 
of this trade they could avert the failure of their enterprise, and 
possibly fill their empty treasury with golden riches. They 
were living in an age of grants and monopolies, and their daring 
request implied nothing unusual or that was inharmonious with 
the practice of favoritism that was ever rife under the Stuart 
kings. 

Captain Standish was sent to England to pacify the partners 
with the new hopes that animated the colony ; he was followed 
in a few months by the more cultured and persuasive AUerton. 
These two worthies had doubtless been with Winslow to the 
Kennebec, and could vividly describe to the honorable gen- 
tlemen of the Plymouth Council the details of the trip, and 

1 In 1628 FlymonUi sent another laden station was maintained three years longer, 

vessel to the eastward ; we do not know when D' Anlnay dispossessed them finally, 

that it entered the Kennebec, bnt it certain- In 1633 the Plymouth colony set up a trad- 

ly visited and traded with the Indians on ing-post at Machias, which was destroyed 

the Penobscot river. The colony this year in 1634 by La Tonr, who killed two of its 

established a trading-post at Bagadnce defenders. All of Plymouth's trading en- 

Point (Castine) ; it was destroyed by the terprises east of the Kennebec were disas- 

French in June, 1632— loss £500; bat the trons failures. 



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22 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

suggest with metaphor the exhaustless store of forest wealth 
that lay unharvested in the valley which the}*^ themselves had 
assisted in discovering. The appeal was sufficiently eloquent to 
be successful. The next year (1627) Allerton came back bring- 
ing the desired patent. It gave to the Plymouth colony the 
ownership of a tract of land on both sides of the Kennebec, with 
the power to establish civil government over it and the exclusive 
right to trade with the Indians who inhabited it. The latter 
feature was the only one of special and inmiediate interest to 
the colonists. It permitted them to expel all rival and inter- 
loping traders who might tempt and corrupt the Indians as well 
as seek for a share of the trade with them. It was no part of the 
purpose of the Pilgrims in procuring the patent, to subdue the 
territory into homesteads and settlements, but to preserve it as 
a wilderness for the sake of its natural productions. Yet such 
a possession would be worthless without the friendship of the 
natives who roamed its labyrinth of streams and forest, and 
who would be indispensable in the collection of fui*s. The 
Indian in his resentments makes little distinction between the 
person who injures him and the nation to which that person 
belongs, and if miscellaneous traders were not carefully exclud- 
ed, there would be danger of wrongs and enmity between them 
and the natives, such as would render the traffic precarious and 
unpleasant. It was a complete monopoly of the trade, and 
ample power to protect it, that the Pilgrims asked for and ob- 
tained. 

The text of the first form of the patent was vague and indefi- 
nite ; the bounds and descriptions, probably derived from the 
personal recollections of Allei-ton's visit to the region, could not 
be aptly applied to the Kennebec. There were not then any 
common geographical names along the river ; the «cene was far 
different from now. The cities and towns that to-day mark the 
river's course had then no existence ; the dense and limitless 
forest covered the land. Here and there along the shores were 
landing places and well-worn paths that leid up the banks to the 
openings on the level intervales, where for countless generations 
as often as spring and autumn had rolled around, the red men 



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THE PILGRIM FATHEB8 ON THE KENNEBEC. 23 

hnd built for temporary abode their fragile wigwams. The 
places that are now familiar as marts of trade and industry were 
then wild recesses — the browsing-ranges of moose and deer, the 
haunts of the wolf and bear or the village home of the beaver. 
They were nameless to the whites and were not all accounted 
worthy by the natives to be characterized in their own tongue. 
Therefore, we need not wonder that a region so barren of names 
and so little known to civilized people should have been poorly 
descri1>ed in the first attempt to convey it to the Plymouth col- 
ony. But on Allerton's return from his third visit to England 
he brought to Plymouth a renewal of the patent in language 
that was supposed to make its bounds precise and intelligible. 
It was dated January 16, 1629. 

Know t£, that the said Council', by virtue and authority of his said late 
Majesty's letters patents, and for and in consideration, that William Bradford, 
and his associates, have, for these nine years, lived in New England aforesaid ; 
and have there Inhabited and planted a town caUed by the name of New Ply- 
mouth, at their own proper costs and charges : and now seeing, that by the 
special providence of God, and their extraordinary care and industry, they 
have increased their plantation to near three hundred people, and are, upon 
occasions, able to relieve any new planters, or other his Majesty's subjects, 
who may fall on that cdast — Have given, granted, bargained, sold, enfeoffed, 
aUotted, assigned, and set over, and by these presents, do clearly and abso- 
lutely give, grant, bargain, sell, allene, enfeoff, allot, assign, and confirm, unto 
the said William Bradford, his heirs, associates, and assigns, all that part of 
New England, in America aforesaid, and tract and tracts of land that lye 
within or between a certain rivulet or rundlett, there commonly called Coahas- 
set, alias Conahasset, . . . [bounding the grant of the home territory of New 
Plymouth.] 

And forasmuch as they have no convenient place, either of trading or fishing, 
within their own precincts, whereby (after so long travel and great pains) so 
hopeful a plantation may subsist, as also that they may be encouraged the bet- 
ter to proceed in so pious a work, which may especially tend to the propaga- 
tion of religion, and the great increase of trade to his Majesty's realms, and ad- 
Tancement of the public plantation — the said Council have farther given, 
granted, bargained, sold, enfeoffed, allotted, assigned, and set over, and by 
these presents do clearly and absolutely give, grant, bargain, sell, aliene, en- 
feoff, aUot, assign and confirm unto the said William Bradford, his heirs, asso- 
ciates and assigns, all that tract of land, or part of New England, in America, 
which lyeth within or between, and extendeth itself f^om the utmost limits of 

* The Council, established at Flymonth, the planting, ruling, ordering and govern- 
in the county of Devon, hi England, for ing of New England. 



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24 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

Cobblseconte, alias Comasconte, which acUoineth to the river Kenebeck alias 
Kenebekike, towards the Western ocean ; and a place called the Falls, at Ne- 
gnamkike, In America aforesaid, and the space of fifteen English miles on each 
side of the said river, commonly called Kennebeck river; and all the said river 
called Kennebeck, that lies within the said limits and bounds, eastward, west- 
ward, northward or southward, last above-mentioned; and all lands, grounds, 
soils, rivers, waters, fishings, hereditaments, and profits whatsoever, situate, 
lying and being, arising, happening or accruing, or which shall arise, happen 
or accrue, in or within the said limits or bounds, or either of them ; together 
with tree ingress, egress and regress, with ships, boats, shallops and other ves- 
sels, fjrora the sea commonly called the Western ocean, to the said river called 
Kennebeck, and from said river to the Western ocean ; together with all pre- 
rogatives, rights, royalties. Jurisdictions, privileges, ftranchtses, liberties and 
immunities ; and also marine liberty, with the escheats and casualties thereof 
(the Admiralty jurisdiction excepted), with all the interest, right, title, claim, 
and demand whatsoever, which the said Council and their successors now 
have or ought to have and claim, or may have or acquire hereafter, in, or to 
any of the said portions or tracts of land hereby mentioned to be granted, or 
any the premises, in as tree, ample and beneficial manner, to all intents, con- 
structions and purposes whatsoever, as the said Council, by virtue of his 

Miijesty's said letters patents, may or can grant To have and to 

hold the said tract and tracts of land in fee, rendering to the King, his heirs 
and successors, forever, one fifth part of the ore of the mines of gold and sil- 
ver, and one fifth part thereof to the said Council. 

And the said Council fUrther granted to the said Bradford, his heirs, asso- 
ciates and assigns, their factors, agents, tenants and servants, liberty to trade 
and traffic, as well with the English as the natives, within the precincts afore- 
said ; with liberty of fishing upon any part of the sea-coasts and sea-shores of 
any of the seas and islands ac^acent, and not being inhabited or otherwise 
disposed of by order of the said President and Council. 

Also, it was fhrther granted, that it should be lawfhl for the said Bradford, 
and his associates, by some usual or fit name and title, to form him, or them- 
selves, or the people there inhabiting under him or them, into a body politic 
and corporate, for the better government of their afllftirs, in America. 

And the said Council constituted Edward Winslow, and others, their attor- 
neys, to enter, and take possession and seisin of the granted premises, and to 
deliver possession and seisin thereof to the grantees; — which was done and 
performed accordingly. 

This was the ** enlarged and corrected" patent under which 
Plymouth carried on its trade with the Indians, and which, by- 
accretions and»confirmations in after years, was brought to in- 
clude a considerably larger territory. 

When Alleiton returned fi'om England with the first issue of 
the patent he brought the consent of the home partners to release 
the Plymouth planters from their contract of service for the sum 



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THE PILORIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 25 

of £1800, payable in nine annual installments, and they were to 
convey to the plantera ''every their atocks, shares, lands, mer- 
chandise and charter ;*' the proposal was gladly Hgreed to, and 
** seven or eight of the chief men of the place became jointly 
bound for the payment of this £1800, in the behalf of the rest 
at the several days." The newly made freemen of Plymouth 
then organized themselves into a joint-stock-company, and 
agreed that the trade should *' be managed as l)efoi*e, to help pay 
the debts." Freed from the thnilldom of the old partnerehip 
the colony thenceforth was master of the situation, and it began 
to prosper and grow strong. 

Those who came to Ihe Kennebec and conducted in person 
the transactions with the natives were the foremost men of the 
colony ; their names are now household words. Edward Wins- 
low and "a few of the old standards" had discovered the trade, 
and they were the first to improve the privileges of the patent. 
The engagement by the colony to pay off the English partners 
was a burden that called into exercise the highest order of busi- 
ness ability ; a few men became by natural selection the managers 
of the financial affairs of the community. The colony leased 
to eight of them its common privilege of trading with the 
natives of New England, and its exclusive right to trade on the 
Kennebec. The lessees were Wm. Bradford, Myles Standish,' 
Isaac Allerton, Edward Winslow, Wm. Brewster, John How- 
land, John Alden, and Thomas Prince, of Plymouth ; James 
Shirley, John Beauchamp, Richard Andrews, and Timothy 
Hatherly were associate pailners resident in England. The first 
seven were passengers in the Mayflowei* — Prince came in the 
Fortune y a year later. These associates agreed ''to pay, dis- 
charge, and acquit the said colony, of all the debts, both due for 
the purchase [£1800] or any other way belonging to the same" 
(about £600 more) ; and also to ^ bestow £50 per annum in hose 
and shoes, to be brought over [from England] for the colony's 
use to he sold them for com as 6s. per bushel." On the other 
hand, '* every seveml purchaser" (shareholder in the colony) 
agreed "yearly to pay, or cause to be paid, to the aforesaid 
parties, .... three bushels of corn or six pounds oi 



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26 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

tobacco, at the undeitaker's choice ;" the parties were '^to have 
and fully enjoy the pinnace, the boat at Manamett, and the shal- 
lop called the Bass Boat ; with all other implements to them 
belonging, that is in the store of the company ; with all the 
whole of furs, sells [shells], beads, corn, wampumpenk, hatch- 
ets, knives-, &c., that is now in the store, or any other way due 
unto the same upon account ;" and it was also agreed ^ that the 
aforesaid parties have the whole trade to themselves, their heirs 
and assigns, with all the privileges thereof, as the said colony 
doth now, or may use the same ; for six full years to begin the 
last of September next ensuing" (1628). The signatures of 
twenty-seven men of the colony were affixed to these covenants 
as preserved by Governor Bradford, who says: — ^" after the 
which were signed by them, we made division of the cattle and 
other things, every one having according to their proportion of 
shai*es, and so were set free from all engagements and debts, 
they were wholly relying on our heads. *'^ 

It was under this lease and by the eight lessees above named, 
that the trade on the Kennebec was first systematically pursued, 
by the erection, in the fall of 1628, of a permanent trading-post, 
^ above in the most convenientest place for trade." The precise 
location of this establishment is not given in the annals. It 
Inust have been within the borders of the patent as understood 
by the patentees, and therefore between "the utmost bounds of 
Cobbasecontee [Gardiner], .... and a place called the 
falls of Negumkike" (Vassjilboro). It was uniformly referi'eil 
to as "the Kennebec," or "the trading-house on the Kennebec." 
Father Druillettes, who gives us in 1651 for the first time the 
word Kouissnok, from which the name Cushnoc has come, says 
the house was at a place that was " called Kouissnok by both 
the Indians and the English."^ Joseph Bane, who was a cap- 
tive among the Indians for eight years (from 1692), siiys they 
called the place of the trading-house "Cushenock." Thei^e is 
neither record nor other evidence that the Plymouth colony 
ever built a permanent trading-house in more than one place on 

8 Gov. Bradford's Letter Book. Mass. * Jesuit Relations, 1651-2. 
Hist. Soc. CoU., Vol. Ill, p. 60. 



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THE PILOBIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 27 

the river. The inference, strengthened by unvarying tradition, 
is irresistible, that the house which was mised in 1628 under the 
stimulus of the patent brought by Allerton from the Plymouth 
Council, was located on the plateau where the remains of Foit 
Western now stand, near the east bank of the river in the city 
of Augusta. To this point in the river the vessels of the 
colony could easily sail ; the neighboring rapids and streams 
were favorite fishing-places for the Indians, who were accus- 
tomed to hold in the vicinity two great councils every year.^ 
This was near the centre of the patent, and a place well suited 
to become the emporium of barter between the colony and the 
tribe. 

No description has been given us of the trading-house. We 
are fancy-free as to its size and appearance. It was the proto- 
type of the log dwellings of the woodsmen in Northern Maine 
to-day. It was built with axes that had been used in felling the 
forest at Plymouth, and by brawny workmen who had aforetime 
tugged with the crew mid the ocean tempest on the sheets and 
anchor of the Mayflower. It was the first domicile erected by 
civilized men on the original Kennebec. In those days it was 
usual when building a frontier house to surround it with a stock- 
ade as a precaution against possible attack by the natives or 
even wild beasts. This was a row of stout stakes firmly planted 
close together in the gi'ound and towering nearly twice the 
height of a tall man. The Kennebec trading-house was so sur- 
rounded, and was called a** fort" by Father Druillettes, who 
first saw it in 1646. The outer wilderness was effectually par- 
titioned from the enclosure, where the half-dozen traders could 
dwell in security by night as well as by day, though in the 
midst of a multitude of Indians whose condition of savagery 
had not been mitigated by any aid from civilization. 

We are not left to conjecture as to the contents of the house 
after it had teen stocked for trade. The goods were selected to 
supply the needs and humor the appetite and fancy of a people 
unversed in every art except that of gleaning their subsistence 

< Jesuit RelatlonB, 1651-2. 



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28 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

from the meagre resources of their wild forest home. The 
Indians often suffered hunger through inability to procure food 
with their insufficient weapons ; their sparsely-clad bodies shiv- 
ered from the chills of a!utumn and frosts of winter. In their 
destitution the poor natives inordinately grasped the white man's 
offering of food and raiment at the latter's own price. Corn 
was the leading article; it was never omitted in any cargo 
brought to them, and it was grown si)ecially for the trade by the 
Plymouth plantei*s. Though the natives themselves planted 
corn on the mellow intervales where we still find traces of their 
encampments, the production must have been small, and the 
crop was usually consumed as soon as it became edible. The 
traders brought also biscuits, fruits, and other kinds of food, 
and, alas, the dreadful fire-water !® Clothing was craved by the 
natives, so blankets were brought to supplant on the shoulders 
of sagamore and squaw the skins of moose or bear that had 
hitherto been their only mantles. Knives and hatchets were 
supplied to take the place of implements of flint and stone ; and 
kettles in which to cook the feast pushed aside the rude pottery 
whose sherds are found to-day among the ashes of the lodge- 
fires. Pipes and tobacco for the council, and beads and gew- 
gaws for personal decoration, were brought in plenty by the 
traders. It is cheerfully related that Plymouth bought of De 
Rasieres, a Dutch trader who sailed into Plymouth harbor in 
1627, £50 worth of wampum (from wampumpeag), which proved 
to be a phenomenally lucrative transaction. The article consist- 
ed of ^ white and blue beads [made from sea-shells], long and 
large as a wheat-corti, blunt at the ends, perforated and strung.'* 
Only the Narragansetts and neighboring tribes possessed the art 
of making them. The consignment to the Kennebec was not 
immediately successful. The good sense or stolidity of the na- 
tives withstood for a while the temptation ; " at first it sticks 
two years," say the annals, and ''then we can scarce procure 
enough." But the aboriginal beaux and belles finally succumbed 

** Les boiBSons de V Europe" (the bev- Jesnit Relations, 1647, p. 63. 
erages of Europe). Father Droillettes. 



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THE PILGBIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 29 

to the fascination of the pretty and novel trifle. It became the 
nige on the Kennebec — sagamore, sannup, and squaw were alike 
affected by the fashion. '*The article commanded a more ready 
market than any other commodity.*' ^ "By the monopoly of these 
beads alone the Plymouth people engrossed the whole trade on 
the river to the exclusion of the fishermen and other planters." 
The whimsical love of the natives for the frivolous beads was 
without reluctance gratified as a matter of pure business by the 
prosperous traders. 

The Indians on their part returned the full value of all they 
received. Silver and gold they had not, but the innumerable 
wild animals of their domain furnished a substitute. Peltrj^ was 
the red man's currency. The beaver — the ingenious builder 
whose instinct so simulates reason that he seems partly human 
— was the favorite victim of the hunt ; his rich skin of silky fur 
brought the highest price ; otter, marten, mink, ermine and fox, 
yielded the tribute of their valuable skins ; the bear, lynx and 
wolf found only such exemption from the flaying-knife as their 
strength and ferocity could earn ; the wolverine, raccoon, 
muskrat and rabbit supplied a convenient fractional currency ; 
the moose, deer and caribou — the main source of clothing sup- 
ply to the natives — were now pursued more eagerly than ever 
before that the white man of Europe might enjoy as a luxury 
that which at best but poorly shielded the body of the savage 
from the inclemencies of the northern climate. 

The traffic with the Indians was exceedingly profitable ; the 
vessels carried to Plymouth great gains every trip. Governor 
Bradford says they took twenty hhds. (beaver) in one year, 
and he gives in detail the shipments to England from 1631 to 
1636, amounting to 12,1-50 li. beaver, and 1,150 li. otter, " Sould 
as appears by leters, the coat beaver usualy at 203. pr pound 
and some at 24s., the skin at 15s., sometimes 16. I doe not 

remember any under 14 It was conceived that 

the former parcells of beaver came to little less than 10,000 li. 
sterling. And ye otter skins would pay all the charges." Corn 

' J^illiamaon'B History of Maine, Vol. I, p. 236. Bailey's New Plymonth, Vol. I, p. 161, 



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30 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

and beaver-skins became the standard of value to which the 
prices of all other articles of trade conformed. John Winter 
must have h<ad the Kennebec trading-post in his mind when 
(in 1631) he wrote from his fishing-station on Richmond island 
in Casco bay, to his employer Trelawney in England, that "the 
trade with the Indians is woith little except it be with them 
that dwelleth in the rivers among them."® By the policy of 
confidingly living in their midst the Plymouth people became 
entrenched in the friendship of the natives who under the 
protection of the patent we have reason to believe were less 
abused by the whites than any other eastern tribe. 

This trading-post seems to have been permanently maintained, 
and for a series of years constantly occupied. Bradford says it 
was furnished with "comodties . . . • both winter and 
somer.'* The lonely traders found relief from the tedium of 
their isolation in the bai-ter which they encouraged and enjoyed, 
with the natives, who came in motely groups from their encamp- 
ments along the river and by the neighboring lakes to admire 
and buy the captivating novelties of the pale-faces. The near- 
est white neighbors were at Merry meeting bay, where Thomas 
Purchas traded (since 1625) with the Androscoggin tribe. In 
mid-winter, when the fishes which at other seasons served as 
the principal food of the natives had dispersed from the river 
to the deeper waters of the sea and lakes, the Indians were 
compelled to seek subsistence elsewhere. Their usual resort 
was noilhward, to the region of the sources of the Kennebec, 
where the tribe separated according to' family or affinity into 
many small parties, and dispersed over a vast hunting-territory, 
where in the words of Druillettes who thrice accompanied them, 
"they made war upon the moose," ^ and captured also in abund- 
ance the other species of game then conmion in the woods of 
Maine. There they lived in groups until spring, when their 
return-migration began. Each paitj^ constructed for itself, 
usually of bark but sometimes of logs, the canoes necessary to 
carry its members and their collection of peltry down the river 

8 Trelawney Papers, Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., » Jesuit Relations, 1646-7. 
new series. Vol. Ill, p. 60. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 31 

# 

to the place of their old encampments, where the salmon, shad 
and alewives were again assembling in vast schools on their 
yearly upward passage to their native streams. It was to meet 
the tide of this downward raigmtion of the tribe fi*om the win- 
ter hunt that the traders kept their house open** both winter 
and somer;*' and this spring trade was no small part of the 
year's business. Spring after spring the Plymouth people sent 
their vessels with new goods as early as the breaking of the ice 
would allow them to ascend to the trading-post. Rival traders 
looked covetously at the river, and would fain trespass upon 
its precious waters for a share of the wealth that was pouring 
into Plymouth. 

In April, 1634, Thomas Prince (then Governor), John 
Howland and John Alden, three of the lessees, were **at the 
Kennebec" in charge of the trade. There were with them as 
employees, John Frish, Thomas Savory, William Rennolls, 
and Moses Talbott. Their vessel had ascended to the trading- 
post, when to their consternation they saw defiantly ** riding at 
anker" in the river "above the house," the trading-bark of a 
stranger. This daring menace to their jcherished right excited 
their indignation. They immediately challenged the intruder, 
through John Howland, their spokesman, to give reason why 
he thus wronglully invaded their domain. John Hocking, the 
master, answered haughtily from his deck that he had been 
sent hither from the Piscataqua by his employers, and that if 
his coming made any account to settle the reckoning must be 
with them. It seems that Hocking had troubled the river 
before, and that Plymouth had sent an agent to the paities on 
the Piscataqua "to know whether it was their mind that he 
should thus wrong" it in the Kennebec trade, and they said 
they "^sent him not hether." Hocking was n(»w told this by 
Howland, and peremptorily " charged to waye his ankers and 
depart;" but with oaths and threats he "answered he would 
not." The situation demanded resolute action, and Howland 
ended the parley by ordering his men to cut the two lines which 
held the trespassing craft to its moorings, that the swift current 
might carry it helplessly down the river which was swollen by 



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32 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, ^ 

the rains and melting snow of the season. The order was 
quickly responded to ; one ro^^e was severed by a party in a 
boat, and when the knife was near the other Moses Talbott, who 
was performing the ordei*s of his master, fell lifeless as a bullet 
from Hocking's carbine crashed into his brain; then as if his 
terrible work was not finished, the enraged adventurer seized 
his pistol, — "but the Lord stayed him from doing any further 
hurt,"^^ for he like his victim at that moment fell lifeless from a 
shot fired by one on the Plymouth bark, whose name has been 
•withheld. This crael double-tragedy that tinged for the first 
time with English blood the pure water of the Kennebec, left 
the Plymouth actors in the full possession of all they claimed. 
The bodies of the bravely obedient Talbott, and the rash, im- 
petuous Hocking were buried on the shore near the place of 
violence, and their lonely graves were soon obliterated by the 
forest shrubbery and forgotten. 

This afliiir is mentioned by Bradford as "one of the saddest 
things which befel them since they came." "The Lord Saye and 
the Lord Brooke with some other great persons had a hand" in 
the plantation on the Piscataqua; Hutchinson (Hist, of Mass.) 
says they claimed a right to trade on the Kennebec, and adds, 
"I suppose by a grant from Gorges." This tends to explain 
the action of Hocking in defending with his life what in his 
imperfect knowledge he may have considered to be his masters' 
rights, and also to mitigate the censure attached to him in the 
Plymouth version of the aflair. The subject soon became 
prominent in the public mind. Tidings of the fatal aff'ray 
spread to all the settlements, and to none sooner than to the 
Piscataqua, where the vessel that was bereft of its captain and 
stained with his blood immediately returned. The Plymouth 
vessel also must have hastily returned, for in Maj^ John Alden 
was in Boston, where he was aiTested for complicity in the 
homicide on the complaint of a kinsman of Hocking, and held 
to bail. "This we did," says Governor Winthrop, "that notice 
might be taken, that we [the Massachusetts colony,] did 

M New Eng. Gen. & Antq. Register, Vol. IX, p. 80. Winthrop's Journal, p. 64. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 33 

disavow said action, which was so much condemned of all men, 
and which was feared would give occasion to the King to send 
a general governor over ; and besides had brought us all and 
the gospel under a common reproach of cutting one another's 
throats for beaver." It was necessary for state reasons to 
publicly investigate the affair, even if it be only in a perfunctory 
way. 

The powerful lords, the patrqns of Piscataqua, threatened to 
retaliate in kind for the outmge upon their servant; the 
Massachusetts colony was in danger of being involved, and for 
prudential reasons as well as in neighborly kindness to 
Plymouth, deemed it well to act promptly. There seemed to 
be no better way to meet the emergency than by a conference 
of prominent men whose character and position would give 
weight to their veixlict and insure for it popular acceptance. 
Accordingly there met at Boston a self-constituted court, com- 
posed of Governors Bradford and Winslow and Pastor Smith 
of Plymouth, with "Governor Winthrop, Mr. Cotton, Mr. 
Wilson, and other magistnites and ministers" of the Massachusetts 
colony, who after having "sought the Lord "in pitiyer, entered 
upon the consideration of the subject. Plymouth's represent- 
atives pleaded eloijuently the privileges of the patent, and the 
right of self-preservation ; they admitted that their servant killed 
Captain Hocking, but averred that it was done to save the lives 
of others. In ample words of regret, "they acknowledged 
that they did hold themselves under the guilt of the sixth com- 
mandment, in that they did hazard man's life for such a cause, 
and did not rather wait to preserve their rights by other means, 
which they rather acknowledged, because they wished it not 
done ; and hereafter they would be careful to prevent the like." 
The Boston members of the court found it easy in their friend- 
ship to be impressed by the arguments and contrition of the 
Plymouth brethren, and concluded to excuse the unfortunate 
killing of Captain Hocking. Governors Dudley (then in the 
chair,) and Winthrop gave their aid to Plymouth in its endeavor 
to allay the wrath of the Piscataqua proprietors, who after 
Winslow had visited England and perhaps pleaded before them 



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34 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

in person, became pacified. John Alden did not receive any 
other punishment than that of his arrest. The validity of the 
patent was from that time acknowledged by all men, and we do 
not know that the Plymouth traders were ever again vexed by 
interlopers. 

The fii*st lease of the patent expired in 1634, but it seems to 
have been renewed or its terms continued to the same lessees, 
until they had paid to the retired partners and other creditors 
the full sum of the colony's indebtedness for which they were 
bound, the last note maturing in 1637. Having fully performed 
their engagements with the colony and its ci*editors, tlie lessees 
as a company retired from the business on the Kennebec, which 
for nine years had received their close attention and which had 
not only paid the debts that once seemed likely to crush 
Plymouth, but must also have paid the company a good margin 
as profit. After ten years of constant traffic the trade on the 
river had considerably diminished; the Indians, impelled by 
their passion for the white man's goods had hunted their ter- 
ritory with unusual vigor, and in consequence the valuable 
animals — incessantly warred upon by improved traps and oc- 
casional fire-arms, — were killed faster than their rate of increase, 
or driven to the grounds of other tribes. The wealth of the 
patent had been so thoroughly gleaned, that when the first 
lessees retired, there were no parties ready to take the lease on 
the old terms. For a little while "the commerce with the 
Indians on the Kennebec had been likely to be abandoned." ^^ 
But in 1638 a second lease was made by the colony to a new 
company, at the reduced rate of a sixth part of the profits. 
The only further record of this lease is, that with the first fruits 
of it, the colony built a prison. 

The Kennebec patent like the tract on Plymouth bay, was 
issued in the name of William Bmdford, who by common con- 
sent retained the title until his engagement jointly with that 
of his associates as bondsman of the plantation had been per- 
formed ; then he formally surrendered (1640) to the colony 

u Palfrey's History of New England, Vol. I, p. 239, ed. of 1866. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 35 

what the Plymouth council had granted in his name including 
the patent on the Kennebec, During the nine following yeare, 
the business of the patent was carried on directly by the colony 
itself, through an agent and a few employees, — probably men 
who had been under the first lessees, and therefore acquainted 
with the river and its inhabitants. In the records of 1646, 
March 3, we read that '* the committee for the Kennebec brought 
in an account into the court for the 3'ear 1644, which came that 
year to but thirty pounds ; and also an account how it was 
disbursed for the country's use, which the court accepted and 
allowed; and they are thereof discharged; and likewise to- 
wards the i-ent for the year 1645 ; there was an account exhibited 
whereby there appeared to be in the Store for the countiy's use 
six barrels of powder ; three hundred weight of lead ; • . . 
pounds of bullets, and four pounds, nineteen shillings and six- 
l)ence remaining due to the country from them, besides thirty 
shillings for bottells which was not cleared that they were spent 
for the country's use ; but the 300 waight of lead is not yet paid 
for." The smallness of these two yeai-s' profits moved the court 
to solicit bids for the sale of the trade in the future. The record 
says, March 3, 1646 : " Whereas the tyme being this court 
wherein order is to be taken for letting of the trade at Kennebec, 
else it would endanger the loss of this year's benefit, by reason 
whereof the court is constrained to nominate and authorize a 
committee to let forth the same to the best advantage of the 
government, and for the tyme of . . years, to such as will 
give the most for it, have therefore nominated and authorized 
the Governor [Bradford,] and assistant Goveraor [Thomas 
Prince] with Mr. John Alden, Mr. Wm. Thomas, John Howland, 
Jonathan Brewster and Josias Winslow, as a committee to let 
forth the same unto them the first Tewsday in May next " (1646). 
This committee apparently never made any report — they prob- 
ably could not find an acceptable customer ; nobody wanted to 
buy, and so the court in behalf of the colony was obliged to 
continue the business by an agent or committee. This year 
(1646) John Winslow appears to us for the first time in charge 
of the trading-post. He was the brother of Edward, and landed 



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36 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

at Plj'mouth in the fall of 1621 from the Fortune — the first ves- 
sel that foHowed in the wake of the Mayflower. John, like his 
brother, possessed great strength of character, and though of 
less public prominence than Edward, he was none the less en- 
dowed with business ability and large-heartedness — qualities 
that may be exhibited by the overaeer of an obscure trading- 
house, as well as by the honored and distinguished governor, 
perhaps languishing in Fleet prison for his intrepidity, or suc- 
cessfully soliciting from Cromwell and his parliament pledges 
for the political security of New England. 

John Winslow was the colony's resident agent on the Kenne- 
bec for several years, managing the business of the patent, and 
accounting to the magistrates ; later, when the trade was again 
leased, he was employed by the lessees in the same capacity, 
and when the patent was finally ofibi'ed for sale, he became one 
of the purchasers. 

On June 8, 1649, the colony appointed, as a committee, Wm. 
Coliar, Captain Myles Standish, Timothy Hathorlee, John 
Browne, Wm. Thomas, James Cudworth and Constant South- 
worth, ''to treat of and let out the trade at Kennebeck." This 
committee on ''the 4th day of July did let and set the said 
trade unto Wm. Bradford [then governor] , Edward Winslow 
[then in England], Thomas Prince, Thomas Willet, Wm. 
Paddy ,^^ upon the like conditions as formerly" (a sixth part of the 
profits). 

By the coming of Father Druillettes with the gospel to the 
Kennebec tribe, we are enabled through the Jesuit Relations 
to obtain a few faint glimpses of the trading-post and its w^orthy 

12 William Faddy rexnoved from Fly- hbrb . sleeps . that 

mouth to Boston, where he died. In the blebed . one . whoes . libp 

V, , ^. , , . , .. GOD . HELP . US . ALL . TO . LIVE 

King's Chapel bnrying-gronnd there is an ^^^^ . g^ , ^^en . tiem . shall . be 

antique memorial slab that has been de- that . we . this . wobld . must • liey 

tached from the grave which it originally we . ever . may . be . happt 

marked and is now vagrantly leaning with . blessed . william . paddy 

against a wall of the chapel. Some words here : lyeth 

of the inscription have disappeared under the : body : of : mr : 

the effacing finger of time. The legible ^yi]t^^^l^2^'t^^'' 

portion is here transcribed from the wasting this : lipb : august : the : [28] 
stone to the more enduring pages of a book. 1658 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 37 

master, and likewise of the natives as they contentedly occupied 
their ancestral river before the white men sought to drive them 
from it. Druillettes arrived at the trading-post the first time in 
the early autumn of 1646, He came from Quebec by way of 
the Chaudiere. He built a chapel with the approval of Wins- 
low, about three miles above the trading-post, and named it the 
Mission of the Assumption. He returned to Quebec the next 
summer, but came back in 1650 and again in 1651. He sus- 
tained the most friendly relations with the trading-post and the 
Plymouth colony, which gave him permission to build a peima- 
nent church on its territory if he so desired.^' 

There was at that time hostility between the Kennebec tribe 
and the Iroquois, and the latter made frequent raids on the for- 
mer's hunting grounds, killing and scalping the rightful occu- 
pants. Father Druillettes made two journeys to Boston and 
Plymouth, in the effort to induce the colonies of New England 
to protect the Abenakis from these raids of Iroquois, or at least 
to desist from selling arms to the latter. The Plymouth colony 
heartily seconded Druillettes* endeavors, but being in league 
with the other colonies it could not alone declare war against 
the Iroquois even to save from destruction the trite on its own 
ten'itory. Druillettes returaed sadly from Boston to the Ken- 
nebec, in the fall of 1651, and in March of the following year 
closed his labors with the distressed Al)enakis and returned to 
Quebec. 

This abandonment by New England of the Kennebec Indians 
to the raids of the merciless Mohawks shortened the history of 
the Plj'mouth colony on the Kennebec. That colony could not 
go to war on its own account — it was no longer independent, 
by reason of the confederation, and the parties from the country 
of the Five Nations continued to '^kill and hunt to death" the 
tribe on the Kennebec, to the demoralization and final ruin of 
the Plymouth trade with them. 

The rich returns received by the hands of the first lessees of 

u For detailed acooant of Father DmiU W. Blake & Co.'s History of Kennebec 
lette'8 labors with the Abenakis see chapters Connty, pnUished in 1892. 
on "The Indians of the Kennebec,*' in H. 



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38 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

the patent led the people to regard the Kennebec as a never- 
failing fountain of wealth ; while the resources of the patent had 
much diminished after a decade, the volume of trade was still 
considerable and brought a handsome profit ; and had the Indians 
remained unmolested by their enemies, or had Plymouth reso- 
lutely espoused their cause and protected them with arms, there 
is no i*eason to doubt the tiiiffic would have continued profitable 
for many years. 

The colony itself, as we have seen, conducted the trade by an 
agent at the time when the Mohawks were making their earlier 
forays ; this was the era when the struggle between King Charles 
and his parliament was shaking England to its foundations ; the 
tremor of the shock reached to New England and was felt even 
on the remote banks of the Kennebec. The validity of the land 
titles that had been derived from Charles was liable to be treated 
with disdain by parliament if the monarch's cause failed. Most 
of the New England chaiters and the Plymouth patent might be 
rendered nugatory by the King's triumphant enemies in the day 
of their reckoning. To void the effect of such a possible calam- 
ity the device was adopted by enterprising whites of purchasing 
from the Indians, by small gifts and great blandishments, desir- 
able tracts of land both great and small. Many such purchases 
were made in Maine, and the recognized titles to-day of many 
thousands of acres may he traced to them. The people of 
Plymouth followed the fashion of the day, and on the 8th of 
August, 1648 (a few months before the King's execution), 
obtained a deed of *^ All the lands on both sides of the river 
Kennebec, from Cushenoc upwards to Wesserunsett." The 
deed was signed by Monqain^ alias Nattahanada, and consentecj^ 
to by Essemenosque, Agado, Domago and Tassuck — who are 
mentioned as ''chief men of the place and proprietors thereof. "^^ 
Five years later (September 10, 1653), this deed was reinforced 
by a second and larger one : ''All that tract of land from Cob- 
baseconte unto a place where I [the conveying sagamore] now 

14 The consideration paid was two hogs- of wine, and a bottle of strong waters, 
heads of provisions (one of bread and one (Deed, Lincoln Co. Registry.) 
of pease), two coats of cloth, two gallons 



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THE PHiGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 



39 



dwell 9 called Usserunscutt"** (near Skowhegan). Thus, in the 
era of the Long Parliament, when the convulsive throes of the 
government seemed to make the territory of rock-ribbed New 
England uncertain ground, the colony of Plymouth was fortify- 
ing itself with deeds which not only included the territory of 
the patent bat added thousand of acres to its northern limit. 

Daring the same period there was an able and diligent friend 
at court, in the person of Edward Winslow, who went to 
England in 1646 and remained there in the interest of the colo- 
nies until a few months before his death (1655), enjoying the 
esteem and confidence of Oliver Cromwell and the other leaders 
of the Commonwealth. By his interposition the parliament and 
council of state dealt kindly with his colony, and in 1652 ** grant- 
ed letters under the great seal, confirming and enlarging her 
trade within the patent.*' The title from the crown being thus 
happily confirmed, the Indian deeds were of little use except 
for controversy a century later, when the subject of the true 
bounds of the patent was discussed. The compliant natives 



u August 8th, 1848. Monqnin, alias Na- 
tahanda, who called himaelf son of old Na- 
towormet, Sachem of Kennebec river, sold, 
and set over to the said Bradford, and oth- 
ers, "all the lands on both sides :the said 
river, from Cnthenock upward, to Wesse- 
mntkeik ; to have and to hold to them, and 
their heirs forever; with all the meadows, 
waters, soils, profits, liberties and privileg- 
es, any way belonging thereunto, or arising 
from the same, for and in consideration*' of 
four hogsheads of provisions, and some 
other small articles. This deed is signed 
l^ two witnesses, who, A. D. 1672, made 
oath, before the Deputy Governor that they 
saw Monqnin sign the said deed. On this 
paper, below the attestatations of the wit- 
nesses, made A. D. 1672, there is a certifi- 
cate, signed by Agodoadomago, the son of 
Wasshemet, and l^ Tasock, brother of 
Monqnin, by making their marks, signify- 
ing that they consented to the above sale, 
attested by three witnesses ; two of whom 
made oath, before the said Deputy Gover- 
nor, June 29th A. D. 1672, that they saw the 
payment made to Monquin, and that Bag- 



gadussett, being present, received a part of 
the goods, for the lands aforesaid. 

September 10th, 1653. Essemenosque 
certifies as follows, to wit : "This is to cer- 
tify unto all whom it may concern, that I, 
Essemenosque, inhabitant on Kennebec 
river, and one that is one of the right own- 
ers of Taconett; the which place, as also 
all that tract of land from Cobbiseconte, 
unto a place where I now dwell, called 
Usserunscnt ; all which land was sold by 
Monquin, alias Mnttahanada, unto Wm. 
Bradford, of Plymouth, and his associates : 
all which lands and places, I was willing to 
the sale of, and did give my consent to, and 
did receive part of the pay ; as also, I do 
testify, that neither I, nor any other In- 
dian, did ever blame him for it, but we did 
all fully approve of it. And as for myself, 
and BO many others, are sorry that Lawson 
doth now build at Toconett; and that I 
never did give way to it ; and Baggadus- 
sett did it against his will, by the importu- 
nity of Mr. Lake, Roger Spencer, and 
Lawson [vagrant traders] ; and told them 
moreover, when they did desire to buy it, 



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40 



HI8T0RY OF AUGUSTA. 



gave other deeds covering the patent. Canibas and Abbagadus- 
sett sold to Spencer and Clark all the land on the river, ten 
miles on each side, "up to Nequanikeag and Teconnett Falls.'* 
Canibas sold to Christopher Lawson the same land " up to the 
fall of Teconnett." The action of the council of state not only 
annulled these vagmnt sales but inspired the colony with a pur- 
pose to cultivate more carefully and if possible restore to its 
former state the waning traffic of the Kennebec. 

There was arising among the Indians at this time a spirit of 
discontent at the refusal of the whites to accede to their call 
through Father Druillettes, for protection. The Father with his 
winning ways had left them ; they were alone and counaelless ; 
and there were heartburnings against their white neighbors who 
would not help them kill their enemy. The Sagadahoc and the 
shores of Merrymeeting bay had become by this time (1652) 
. the home of a community of frontiersmen — di*awn hither from 
various parts to engage in the fishing industry, and to trade as 
occasion offered with the Androscoggin and Sheepscot Indians 
and such of the Kennebecs as got past the Plymouth people. 



he would not sell it until he had spoken 
with John Wlnslow ; yet they did preyail 
with him ; for which he did tell all the In- 
dians he was soiry, and would repay what 
he had reoeiyed again. All which I do 
witness l^ my hand and mark. Also I do 
affirm, that Toconett, which Baggadnssett 
did sell to Mr. Lake and the rest, he had 
nothing to do to sell, the place being prop- 
erly mine and Watchogoe's wife's, and that 
Lawson hath lately desired to buy it of us, 
which we have and shall refnse to do. 

Ebsemoxosque, X his mark. 

July 8th, 1665. Baggadnssett made his 
writing of the form following, to wit : Know 
all men by these presents, that whereas 
Monqoln, alias Mattahannada, the son of 
old Nattawormet, sagamore, hath formally 
sold nnto William Bradford, Edward 
Winslow, Thomas Prince, Thomas Willett, 
and William Paddy, all the land upon both 
sides of Kennebeck river, from the lower 
end of Cobbiseconte, to the upper side of 
Wessemnskeik, to have and to hold to them 



and their heirs forever. And whereas Bag- 
gadnssett, Sagamore, doth challenge and 
lay daim to the said lands, as the lawful 
proprietor of the same : now, so it is, that 
the said Baggadnssett hath, this present 
day, sold, enfeoffed, and set over, all his 
right, title, and interest, unto John Wins- 
low, senior, late of Plymouth, and the 
rest of his partners, to him and them, and 
to his and their heirs, executors, and as- 
signs, all the said lands, on both sides the 
river, with all and singular the woods, 
meadows, rivers, with all the privileges and 
appurtenances thereunto belonging; and 
fbr performance hereof, the said Baggadns- 
sett doth bind himself, his heirs and execu- 
tors, forever, firmly by these presents ; as 
witness my hand, this 8th day of July, 1665. 
And in consideration hereof, the said John 
Winslow, for himself and his partners, 
hath given to the said Baggadnssett . . . 
and the worth of two skins of liquor, and 
the worth of one skin of bread, to Abom- 
kett, alias Watchogo. 

X the nuurk of Baggadnssett. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 41 

The region was also the resort of cruising vessels that bore to 
the scattered establishments along the coast supplies both for 
consumption and traffic. These trader-fishermen occupied land 
that had been bought of the natives. Each proprietor was a law 
unto himself; there was no common authority for the protection 
of the right-doer or the punishment of the wrong-doer. In 
order to be under the protecting care of some sort of govern- 
ment, Thomas Purchas had conveyed and submitted his Pejep- 
scot possession to Massachusetts as early as 1639. With this 
exception no system of government by law had been known in 
the Sagadahoc region since Popham's effort in 1607. This 
absence of law was annoying to Plymouth whose Indian wards 
were thereby unhappily exposed to maltreatment by conscience- 
less men living in the doorway of the patent ; no peaceful mode 
of redress was at hand for the sufferer. To palliate this evil the 
magistrates annexed to the next lease of the patent a provision 
that obliged the lessees to remain constantly on the Kennebec. 
In Greneral Court, 29th June, 1652 — **The court are willing and 
due agree to sett and lett ye trade at Kennebec to those that 
formerly had yt [Wm. Bradford, Thos. Prince, Captain Thomas 
Willet, Josias Winslow, Jr., Wm. Paddy], on such tearmes as 
they formerly had yt [£50 a year], if the rest of the ptners 
not present bee willing, for three years, or soe long thereof as 
they shall stay in the government ; but if they, or any of them, 
doe depart out of it before the said tearmes be expired they are 
then to leave it." This new condition may have had reference 
also to the Mohawk trouble. Plymouth was the only colony 
that was directly injured by it, and we have seen that she was 
coldly lefl by her three sisters of the little confederacy to 
deal with it as best she could. The harrassed and unhappy 
natives, scared from their hunting-grounds, and ever fearful of 
the lurking foe, were a little less miserable when the trading- 
house was open to supply them with food on occasions of great 
distress, and to encourage, aid and befriend them. Yet Ply- 
mouth responded only mildly and feebly to the Macedonian cry 
that had been twice echoed throughout New England by the 
brave and devoted Druillettes. 



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42 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

The momentous issue of the civil war in England enabled 
Massachusetts, in 1652, to seize with impunity some of the 
territory of the royal province of Maine which had been given 
(1639) by the lately beheaded king (1649) to his loyal subject 
Sir Ferdinando Gorges. Massachusetts was thus enlarged east- 
ward to Casco bay, and extended its authority accordingly. 
Imitating this policy, Plymouth proceeded the next year to en- 
large its domain and impose its jurisdiction over the Sagadahoc. 
The act was favored by the occupants of the territory from 
Pejepscot to the sea, and from Sagadahoc to the Sheepscot. 
Massachusetts, which thereby lost its Pejepscot territory (of 
Thomas Purchas), was estopped by her own act from objecting 
to the proceeding. The Gorges palatinate — between the Piscat- 
aqua and the Sagadahoc and Kennebec — was thus again muti- 
lated. The action was not only agreeable to Lord Protector 
Cromwell, but it seems to have been specially authorized by 
parliament and the council of state, which, in 1652, had required 
"all the English residents upon the river Kennebec to render 
implicit submission to the colonial government in all their civil 
and social concerns." The indulgent policy of the rulers of the 
Commonwealth of England toward the colonies was agreeably 
felt by Plj'mouth on the Kennebec. 

On the 7th of March, 1653, the general court of Ply mouth, — 
composed of Wm. Bradford (governor) , Thomas Prince, Myles 
Standish, Timothy Hatherly, John Browne, John Alden and 
Thomas Willet, — appointed Thomas Prince, one of the court, a 
commissioner " for the erecting some orderly go verment amongst 
the inhabitants of the River Kennebecke." Prince had at that 
time served two of his seventeen years as governor, and seven- 
teen of his twenty yeai's as assistant; he had l)een one of the 
eight associates who hired the patent in 1628, and was present 
at the Talbott-Hocking tragedy in 1634 ; since then he had 
sailed many times to the Kennebec, but his trip to establish on 
its banks for the first time a system of laws for the governance 
of the rugged and scattered inhabitants was his most notable and 
so far as we know his last one. He was given '* full and ample 
power to summons all and eveiy the inhabitants, as he shall see 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 43 

meet, dwelling withia the aforesaid river of Kennebeck, unto 
some convenient place to receive from him such instructions 
and orders extant which hee hath received from the aforesaid 
generall court full power to require the observance of, with full 
power alsoeto assume unto himself any other person or persons 
whatsoever to bee assistant unto him in the premises." His 
series of written instructions enjoined him, — 

(1,) To reqnire the inhabitants ''to take the oath of fldelltie to the state of En- 
gland and the present goverment [government] of New Plymouth; (2,) that he 
acquaint them with the body of lawes of this goverment— oar intention being 
not to expect theire strict observance of everything pecullare to onr selves, 
bat considering the distance of the place, wee doe allow them Ubertie to make 
choise ttt sach to bee assistant to oar commissioner as he shall approve of for 
the making of such ftirther orders as may best conduce to theire welfare ; (S,) 
that none bee allowed for inhabitants there but such as wiU take the oath of 
fldelitie as aforesaid ; (4,) that such persons onley as have taken the said oath 
of fldelitie shall acte in the choise of such as may bee assistant, .... and 
the said assistants to acte as if they were actually fireemen for the present, 
untU ftirther orders bee taken ; (5,) the oath to bee taken of all such inhabitants 
as shall be aUowed to reside in the liberties of this goverment, at the river of 
Eennebecke, is as folio wethe : 'Tou shall be true and faithftil to the state of 
England as it is now established ; and, whereas, you choose to reside within 
the goverment of New Plymouth, you shall not do, nor cause to be done, any 
act or acts, directly or indirectly, by land or water, that shall, or may, tend to 
the destruction or overthrow of the whole or part of that goverment, orderly 
erected or established; but shall contrariwise hinder and oppose such intents 
and purposes as tend thereunto, and discover them to those who are in place 
for the time being; that the goverment may be informed thereof with all con- 
venient speed ; you shall also submit to and observe all such good and whole- 
some laws, ordinances, and officers, as are or shall be established within the 
several limits thereof; so help you God, who is the God of truth and punisher 
of falsehood." 

We have found no contemporary account of this transaction 
other than that given in the original Plymouth record, which 
was based on the official report of the commissioner to the 
magistrates, after his return to Plymouth. The directness and 
brevity can not be improved, whatever may bo said of the 
orthography. 

V^hereas it hath pleased the counsell of state of the commonwealth of En- 
gland, notwithstanding their many, great, and waighty occasions, to take into 
consideration the condition of the English inhabiting upon or neare a^joyning 
unto the river commonly called Kenebeck, whoe, by reason of remoteness 
from other Jurisdictions and their owne phawsite [paucity] and fewness, have 



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44 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

not hitherto injoyed the benifit of goverment, no donbt to the great griefe of 
all well affected English, it hath now pleased the right honorable coansell of 
state by authoritie of Parliament, to confer the goyerment of the aforesaid 
inhabitants upon the jurisdiction of New Plymouth, the first inhabitants and 
goverment in those parts, as by their letters patent doth appear. In pursu- 
ance whereof, and by virtue of the aforesaid authoritie granted to William 
Bradford and his associates, the said William Bradford and his associates att 
a generall court held at New Plymouth gave ftiU power and authoritie to Mr. 
Thomas Prence [Prince], one of the Assistants in the aforesaid goverment, for 
the settling of a goverment upon the said river of Kennebecke ; by virtue where- 
of the said Thomas Prence issued out a warrant directed to the raarshall of 
New Plymouth, bearing date the 15th of May, 1654, requiring the inhabitants 
upon the said river to make their personall appearance att the house of Thomas 
Ashley att Merrymeeting, upon the 23d of that present month ; at which time 
and place the people personally assembled, and after publishing of the afore- 
said authoritie, the inhabitants heer under written, have taken the oath of 
fldelitle : Thomas Ashley, Thomas Atkins, John Brown, James Cole, William 
Davis, Emanuel Heyes, William James, Thomas Parker, John Parker, Thomas 
Purchas, John Richards, James Smith, John Stone, Alexander Thawt, Thomas 
Webber, John White. Att the same meeting Mr. Thomas Purchas was chosen 
by the persons abovenamed, and approved by Mr. Thomas Prence, to bee an 
Assistant to the goverment in this parte of the Jurisdiction of New Plymouth, 
and an oath administered unto him fore the more powerful! and law fhll ad- 
minestration in said office ; and also att the same present meeting Mr. Prence 
hath declared that Lieftenant Thomas Southworth now residing at Cushenage 
[Cushnoc] upon the said river, and such other as shalbee sent thether trom 
time to time to have the goverment of that family, are also en vested into the 
same power and authoritie to bee assistant unto the goverment heer according 
to such good and wholesome lawes as are and shalbee. Att the same time 
Thomas Ashley was chosen cunstable by the inhabitants, and swome to the 
execution of his office.^' 

The oflSce of clerk does not seem to have been filled, though 
the duties were prescribed. A system of ordinances and regu- 
lations adapted to the well-being* of the little community was 
elaborated and ordained by the convention. 

1, all capital crimes, such as treason against England or New 
Plymouth; murder; converse or compact with the devil, in the 
form of conjuration or witchcraft ; wilful burning of houses ; 
and a few others, were to be tried only by the general court at 
New Plymouth. 2, all other crimes were to be tried within the 
jurisdiction of the new government. Theft was to be atoned 
for by restitution of three or four fold, according to the nature 

16 General Conrt, 20, 1654. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 45 

of the offence and the discretion of the local coui*t. The con- 
victed drunkard was finable five shillings for the first ofience, 
ten shillings for the second, and for the third he whs to be set 
in the stocks. Profaning the Lord's day was punishable at the 
magistrate's discretion. As the Indians when intoxicated were 
often guilty of "much hon*id wickedness," even "the murder of 
their nearest i-elations," it was ordered, that every inhabitant 
selling them any strong liquor, should for the fii*st offence forfeit 
double, and for the second, four fold, the value sold ; and for 
the third, he should forever be debarred the privilege of trading 
with them. If the wrong-doer were a stranger, his fine for the 
first transgression was ten pounds, and for the second twenty 
pounds ; one-half to the informer and the other half to public 
uses. 3, in the pmdential regulations, all fishing and fowling 
were expressly continued free to every inhabitant ; if " beaver or 
moose" were presented to any one, for barter by the Indians 
upon the river, a trade with them was to be free, provided no 
prohibited article was sold to them ; all actions between party 
and party were to be tried before a jury of twelve men ; but no 
civil cause above £20 sterling was triable in the local court 
without the consent of both parties. 

Thus a civil government was established by Plymouth from 
Cushnoc to the sea. One of its first resident nuigistrates — 
Thomas Purchas — was a freeman of Massachusetts, but he seems 
to have readily transferred his loyalty to Plymouth and united 
with his neighbors in promoting the work of the commissioner ; 
he received peculiar consideration, — perhaps because of his 
anomalous status — first by being elected a magistrate by his 
fellow traders, and then from the general court of Plymouth, 
which recorded, August 1, 1654 : " Att this court it was agreed 
that a letter should be directed unto Mr. Thomas Purchas, at 
Pasipscott, in the River of Kennebecke, in their names, to ap- 
prove of the sei-vice. hee hath undeitaken ip being healpful and 
assistant in the ordering and governing of the inhabitants of the 
said river and to incurrage him therein, and otherwise to con- 
gratulate with him ; which accordingly was d<me." The other 
magistrate — Thomas Southwoi-th — was of Plymouth, and ap- 



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46 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

pears to have been in charge of the trading-post in 1654, and 
also the next year, for on the 29th of March, 1655, *'Leiftenant 
Thomas Southworth tooke the oath of an assistant, to serve in 
that office at the river of Kennebecke the present summer/' 
Thomas Southworth was the first magistrate of the new local 
government, resident at Cushnoc — the name that had gradually 
come into use to designate the Plymouth establishment ; he was 
son-in-law to Governor Bradford, and seems to have been prom- 
inent in the conduct of the business on the Kennel)ec ; we find 
him in 1648 a witness to Natahanada's deed to the colony, which 
he was probably instnimental in obtaining. After his residence 
at Cushnoc, he became a captain and was elected assistant to the 
home government at Plymouth for twelve consecutive years, 
ending in 1669, which year, according to John Cotton, '*was 
rendered sorrowful and remarkable by the death of Captain 
Thomas Southworth, who, full of faith and comfort, expired at 
Plymouth December 8th, being about fifty-three years old, after 
he had served God faithfully both in a public and private 
station." 

At that early time of scattered habitations nearly every house 
was an inn where the traveller was welcome to food and lodg- 
ing ; but the metropolis of Merrymeeting, whei-e the commerce 
of the Kennebec and Androscoggin converged, needed a public 
house for the convenience of the fi-equently visiting traders, so, 
as soon as the local government had been established, the man 
who was chosen constable was given the further distinction and 
emolument of inn-keeper. It was ordered that "Thomas Ashley 
shall have liberty to keep an ordinary for making comfortable 
provision to entertain strangers and others for their refresh- 
ment, paying for the same." This was the first hostel opened 
on the river. 

The Kennel)ec and Sagadahoc now constituted an organized 
precinct of Plymouth. Doubtless the magistrates and consta- 
bles performed the few and simple duties of their offices to the 
satisfaction of their limited constituency, some of whoso names 
are familiar in the early history of Sagadahoc. Thomas Atkins' 
memory is continued in the present name of the bay noi1;h of 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 47 

the Fort Popham peninsula ; John Parker had bought of an 
Indian the island that is now named Georgetown ; John Brown 
lived within the limits of the jiresent town of Woolwich, and 
was the same John Brown who bought of Samoset, in 1625, the 
Pen^aquid tract ; James Smith also lived at Nequasset and was 
he to whose widow and projierty afterward succeeded William 
Hammond, who was slain at Hammond's Fort in the first Indian 
massacre (1676) of Sagadahoc ;" John Richards had bought of 
the Indians the island that is now the town of Westpoit. Each 
of the sixteen freemen who took the oath was a sturdy pioneer 
of local prominence ; all were men of property which had been 
acquired on the river. 

The second term of the court was appointed to be holden at the 
inn of Thomas Ashley (located at the place now called Th wing's 
Point) , on the Tuesday after the 20th of May next ensuing — 
and probably from year to year in that month. How many 
terms were held is not now known ; no account of any beside 
that here given exists ; whether few or many, the records must 
have been destroyed when the natives in their avenging fury 
swept through the settlements with torch and tomahawk in the 
time of Phillip's war (1675-1678). There is reason to believe 
that this first form of popular government that was ever put in 
operation on the Kennebec and Sagadahoc continued to be ad- 
ministered with more or less vigor until the increasing troubles 
among the Indians gradually drove the whites away. In the 
records of Plymouth, October 1, 1661, "Cushenag" is assessed 
one pound and ten shillings to help defray the public charges, 
and is spoken of as "a township of this goverment." 

However useful and salutary the goveniment organized by 
Governor Prince may have been to the Sagadahoc community » 
it failed to meet the hopes of Plymouth in improving the Indian 
traffic of the Kennebec. The causes of the decline of the trade 
were unreached by the white men's ordinances. The smallness 
of the rental of the patent under the last two leases (£50 a year) , 
covering the period of six years, excited so much discontent in 

" "PioWem of Hammond's Fort," by Ck)U., Quarterly Part No. 3, July, 1890. 
Ber. Henry O. Thayer. Me. Hist. Soc. 



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48 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

the colony that on the 5th of March, 1655, a general court was 
held "to treat and conclude about the letting the trade in Ken- 
nebecke." After a full consideration of the subject, the magis- 
trates "agreed and sett the trade unto Mr. William Bradford, 
Sen., Mr. Thomas Prence and Captain Thomas Willett, for the 
full term of seaven years, beginning when the former tearme 
shallbee expired, they yielding and paying into the hands of 
some man whom the country shall appoint for the receipt thereof 
the summe of thirty-five pounds certaine, per annum ; and this 
to be paid in money, or moose or beaver, at prices current; 
which paiment is to be made att two severall paiments every 
year, viz : the one-halfe on the last of April! and the other halfe 
on the last of November." The lessees were "to improve the 
trade to the best advantage to themselves and the country." 

But so productive had been the patent in the past, that the 
terms of this lease were unsiitisfactory to the people of Plymouth, 
and in July (1655), Josias Winslow, Sen., Josias Winslow, 
Jun., Mr. Hinkley and Robert Sutton were appointed a com- 
mittee of citizens "to meet with the magistrates, to treat with 
them about letting the trade of Kennebeck, and about regulat- 
ing the disorders of government there." This committee care- 
fully inquired into the condition of afiairs, the regulations and 
government, and the accounts of Mr. Paddy, the agent; the 
report of the result of their investigation reconciled the fault- 
finders to the action of the magistrates ; and in 1656 the several 
towns of the Plymouth jurisdiction formally approved the lease 
of March 5, 1655, and appointed the treasurer to receive the 
rental. Though the rental was very small, the lessees announced 
at the end of the third year, that they could not afibrd to con- 
tinue to pay it, and asked to be released from their bargain. 
The trade had become worthless. 

Thomas Prince, one of the lessees (who was again Governor), 
in view of the situation, was moved to issue in concurrence 
with the other magistrates, the following proclamation, June 7, 
1659: 

Forasmuch as we have good information that things are in such a posture at 
Keuebeck, in reference to some troubles among the Indians, some of them l>e- 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 49 

Ing slain, some carried away, and thereby also discoa raged, that there is a 
present desisting Arom their hunting ; and so a cessaslon of trade, whereby 
sncb as have rented the trade of the conntry, are so far discouraged, that they 
see, and it probably appeareth, that they will not only be disabled for paying 
the expected rent; but will be likely to suffer great losses; and do also fear 
they may be forced wholly to desist and to call home their estate there ; where- 
by the trade may be endangered to be lost for the future, if some course be 
not taken about it; the court do therefore recommend it to the several town- 
ships* consideration, and desire they would depute some in whom they can 
tmst, to signify their minds at the sitting of the general court in October 
[1659], and to empower them to act in the premises." ... In response to 
this call the deputies met at Plymouth in October, and agreed, in view of the 
"troubles among the Indians .... that the rent of the said trade for the 
year 1659, ftilly complete, on the first day of November, shall be ten pounds ;*' 
and the lessees were to leave **said Kenebeck trade, tree without engagement, 
unto the couutrie*s dispose as they should think meet ; not leaving above five 
hundred skins in debts to be required of the Indians." The fi*eeholders of Ply- 
month, by their deputies in general court the following year (1660), ''voted 
that any former agreements notwithstanding, it shall be lawful for the gover- 
nor and his partners [Prince, Bradford, Willett, the lessees], things being as 
they are, to call home their estates and servants there, when they shall see 
cause; and that on the other side it is also mutually agreed, that the country, 
or any that they shall allow of, may at present, or when they please, go and 
make some beginning of trade there, notwithstanding any bargain with the 
partners to the contrary, and that if five hundred pounds sterling can be ob- 
tained for the country's interest there. It shall be sold." Thomas Southworth, 
Constant Southworth and Comett Stutson were appointed a committee to sell 
the patent, that the colony might be happily rid of a profitless and troublesome 
appendage. 

The lessees, weary of a business that promised only financial 
disaster, and finally freed from their obligation "to improve the 
trade," soon withdrew their agents, outfit and movable property, 
and abandoned forever the trading-station at Cushnoe, which 
had been for thirty-four j'eara the familiar trysting-place of the 
Plymouth traders and the Kennebec Indians, and had witnessed 
many busy scenes of traffic amid aboriginal surroundings. This 
forced retirement of the colony was the hastened and inevitable 
result of the condition of the Indians ; who, in constant dread 
of the raiding Mohawk, would not venture on the chase, but 
stayed in defensive groups near their fishing-grounds, or huddled 
tremblingly in the coverts of the forest. 

From this epoch in the relations of Plymouth to the Kenne- 
bec, we may date the beginning of the manifestations of undying 



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50 HISTORT OF AUGUSTA. 

hatred by the Kennebec Indians toward the English. The In- 
dians had listened to the gospel as dimly divulged to them 
through the broken language and novel ceremonies of Druil- 
lettes, and in form had embraced Christianity ; they had cele- 
brated the event by crowning their missionary with the lofty 
honor of adoption into their tribe ; they had then been refused 
an alliance which they, as nominally christian inhabitants of the 
proprietary and political jurisdiction of Plymouth, solicited as 
their right against t\ffi raging heathen of the Five Nations. 
They never forgot until their last piteous death-shriek at Nor- 
ridgewock (1724) the desertion of the English in their first hour 
of despair. 

In 1661, when the warwhoop was frequently piercing the 
solitudes of the Kennebec, four purchasers were found for the 
patent. One of them was the former agent, John Winslow. 
The others wore Antipas Boyes, Edward Tyng and Thomas 
Brattle. The price paid was £400 ; the deed was dated October 
27, 1661, and it was executed June 15, 1665 ; it was recorded 
in the county of York in 1719 — after fifty-four years of secret 
slumber among the neglected papers of the half-forgotten pur- 
chasers. 

This Indentare of ye Twenty Seventh day of Octobr Anno Domini One 
thousand Six hundred Sixty & One made between ye General Court for ye 
Jurisdiction of Plymouth in New England iu America in the behalfe of ye sd 
Collony on ye One pt and Antipas Boys Edwd Tynge Thomas Brattle And 
John Winslow of ye Town of Boston in the County of Suffolk in ye Jurisdic- 
tion of ye Massachusets in New England Aforesd Merchts on the Other part 
Witnesseth that Whereas our Late Soveraign Lord King James for ye Ad- 
vancemt of A Collony & plantation in this Country Called or known by ye 
Name of New England in America by his highness letters Pattents under ye 
Great Seal of England bareing date At Westminster ye third day of Novembr 
in ye Eighteenth year of his highness reign of England &c did give grant & 
Confirm unto ye Rt Honble Lodowlck Ld Duke of Lenox George Late Ld 
Marquess of Buckingham James Marquess Hambleton Thomas Earle of Arun- 
del Robert Earle of Warrwick Sr fferdlnando Gorges Knight And divers others 
whose Names Are Expressed In ye sd Letters Pattent & their Successor that 
they should be One body polotlck & Corporate perpetually Consisting of forty 
psons &ca And further also of his Special Grace Certaine Knowledge & Meer 
Notion did give grant & Confirm unto ye sd president & Council And their 
Successors forever undr the reservations Limitations & Declarations in ye sd 
Letters pattents Expressed all that part & portion of ye sd Country Now Called 
New England in America &ca Together Also with all ye firm land Soyles 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 51 

grounds &c As by ye sd Letters Fattents doth more Largely Appear, where- 
upon ye sd Councill by vertae & Authority of ye sd Late Majtys Letter Pat- 
tents And for & in Consideration that William Bradford And his Associates 
for this Nine years have lived in New England Aforesd And have there Inhab- 
ited & planted a Town Called by ye Name of New plymouth at their own 
proper Cost & Charges &c And upon other Considerations As is more Largely 
Expressed in a deed under ye sd Connctlls Seale bareing date ye thirteenth day 
of Janry in ye fifth year of ye reign of Our Late Soveraign Lord Charles ye 
first by ye grace of God King of England Scotland ft>ance & Ireland Defender 
of ye faith &ca Annoq Domini 1629 Have given granted bargained & Sold En- 
feofl'ed Aliened Assigned and Set over unto ye sd Wm Bradford his heirs Asso- 
ciates & Assii^ns All that Tract or Tracts of Land that l3'e within or between 
a Certaine river or rundlet there Comonly Called Cohasset or Conahasset to- 
wards ye North & ye river Comonly Called Narraganset Towards ye South as 
by ye sd Charter may more fUlly Appear And whereas ye sd Councill in Con- 
sideration that ye sd Wm Bradford & his Assoclats have no Convenient* place 
Either of Trading or fflshing within their own presclnts whereby after So long 
a Travell and great pains So hopefbll a plantation may Subsist As Also that 
they may be Encouraged ye better to proceed in So Pious a work wch may 
Especially Tend to ye propagation of religeon & ye Great Increase of trade to 
hLs Mi^tys realms & Advancemt of ye Publick plantation did give grant bar- 
galne Sell Enfeoffe AUott Assigne & Set over unto ye sd Wm Bradford his heirs 
Associates & Assigns All that tract of land or part of New England in America 
aforesd which lyeth within or between And Extendeth its Selfe flrom ye utmost 
Limits of Cobbaseconte Als Conasecoute which a^Joyneth to ye river of Ken- 
ebeck Als Kenebeckick Towards ye Western Ocean and a place Called ye falls 
At Nequamkick in America Aforesd And ye Space of fifteen English miles on 
both Sides sd river Comonly Called Kenebeck river And All ye sd river Called 
Kenebeck river that lyeth within ye sd Limits & bounds Eastward Westward 
Northward and Southward & All lands grounds Soyles rivers tradeing fflshing 
heridttmts & profits whatsoever Scittuate lying & being ^Iniseing happening 
or Accrewing or which shall happen or Accrew in or within ye sd Limits or 
bounds or Either of them Together with tree Ingress Egress & Regress with 
their Boats Shallops & other vessells Arom ye Sea Comonly Called ye Western 
Ocean to ye sd river Called Kenebeck & from ye sd river to ye sd Western 
Ocean. ^ Hereupon ye sd Court & Collony of New plymouth by vertae & Au- 
thority of ye sd deed granted to them by ye Councill Aforesd for & in Consid- 
eration of ye Sum of four hundred pounds Starling to us in hand paid by ye sd 
Antipas Boyes Edwd Tynge Thomas Brattle & John Winslow Wherewitn we 
do Acknowledge Our Selves Satisfied Contented & fully paid & thereof & of 
Every part & parcell thereof Exonerate Acquit and discbarge ye Aforesd Anti- 
pas Boyes Edwd Tying Thomas Brattle & John Winslow them their heirs Exrs 
Admrs & Assigns forever by these presents Have fl'eely & Absolutely bargained 
Alienated and Sold EnfeoflTed & Confirmed And by these prsents do bargaine 
Sell Enfeoffe & Confirm ftom us ye sd Collony & Our heirs to them ye sd Anti- 
pas Boyes Edwd Tynge Thomas Brattle & John Winslow & their heirs & As- 
signs forever All those our lands lying & being in ye river of Kenebeck bound- 
ed As folio weth vizt All that our Tract of Laud in America which Lyeth in or 
between & Extendeth ft-om ye Utmost bounds of Cobbaseconte Als [alias] 



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52 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

Comaseconte which Ac^joyneth to ye river of Kenebeck Als Kenebeckick to- 
wards ye Western Ocean And a place Called ye falls in Nequamkick in America 
Aforesd And ye Space of fifteen English Miles on both Sides ye sd river Corn- 
only Called Kenebeck river And all ye sd river Called Kenebeck river that 
lyeth within ye sd Limits & bounds Eastward Westward Northward & South- 
ward & Also All land grounds Soyles rivers Tradeing ffishing heriditamts & 
profits whatsoever Scittuate lying & being Ariseing hapenlng or Acrewing or 
which shall hapen or Accrew in or within ye sd Limits or bounds Together 
with free Ingress Egress & regress with Ships boats Shallops or other vessells 
ft'om ye Sea Comonly Called ye Western Ocean to ye sd river Called Kenebeck 
& ftrom ye sd river to ye sd Western Ocean As Also All ye lands on both Sides 
ye sd river fi*om Cushena upwards to Weserunscut bought by us of Munguln 
Als Matahameada As Appears by a deed bareing date Augst ye Eighth One 
thousand Six hundred forty & Eight And Consented unto by Essemenosque 
Agadodemagus &Tassuck Chief men of ye place & proprietors thereof To Have 
& To Hold ye Aforesd lands lying & being in ye river of Kenebeck bounded as 
aforesd And Also ye Aforesd Lands on both Sides ye sd river trora Cushena 
upwards to Weserunscut Together with All ye grounds Soyles rivers tradeing 
fishing heriditamts & profits benefits & Priviledges thereunto belonging or 
Accrewing or which Shall hapen or Accrew in or within ye sd Limits or 
bounds or Either of them to ye sd Antipas Boyes Edwd Tynge Thomas Brattle 
& John Winslow to them & their heirs & Assigns forever the sd premisses with 
All our sd lawfull right in ye lands Abovementioned Either by Purchase or 
patteut with All & Singular ye Appurtenances priviledges And Imunitys there- 
unto belonging to Appnrtaine to them ye sd Antipas Boyes Edwd Tynge 
Thomas Brattle & John Winslow to them & Every of them their & Every of 
their heirs & Assigns forever to beholden of his Mt^ty his Manor of East 
Greenewick in ye County of Kent in tree And Comon Soccage^^ And not in 
Caplte Nor by Knight's Service by ye rents & Services thereof & thereby due & 
of right Accustomed Warranting ye Sale thereof Against All People whatso- 
ever that ftom bjr or undr us ye sd Collony of New Plymouth or by our Law- 
full right & Title might Claime Any right & Title thereunto 1 To and for ye 
performance of ye premisses We have hereunto Aflixed ye Seal of Our Govem- 
rat this twenty Seventh of Octobr One thousand Six hundred Sixty And One 
Signed Sealed & Deliv- /■ * -^ Tho Prince Governor 

ered the fflfteenth day g^ 

of June Anno Dom. 

1665 ' — , — ' 

This Deed is Recorded According to Order p me Nathl Morton Secry of the 
Court for ye Jurisdiction of New Plymouth 

Recorded According to ye Original Octobr 22d 1719. 

p Jos : Hamond Regr " 

u Soccage is an old (now obsolete) En- the same as if written free and common ten- 
glish term, meaning "a tenure of lands for ure or tenancy ; that is to say, that tho gov- 
certain inferior husbandry serrices to be emor and company, and associates, free- 
performed for the lord of the fee. Free men of the colony, were all free tenants in 
soccage is defined, where the services are commonofthe "rivers, waters and fishing.'* 
not only certain bnt honorable, and mean » York Deeds, Book IX, folios 226-228. 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 53 

This sale severed the connection between Plymouth Colony 
and the patent. John Winslow, though a Plymouth pilgrim, 
had become (in 1658) a resident of Boston ; his three associates 
were Massachusetts colony men. There is no evidence that the 
partners did anything more with their purchase than to feebly 
attempt to revive the trade, or that they ever received any re- 
turn whatever for their outlay. The transaction was to them an 
unprofitable one, however different it may have proved to those 
of their hell's and assigns who came to the front three genera- 
tions later (June, 1753), under the name of the "Proprietors of 
the Kenneliec Purchase from the late colony of New Plymouth'* 
— commonly called the Plymouth company. 

It is difficult to estimate, in modern value, the full amount of 
wealth which the colony of Plymouth derived from its Kennebec 
possession. The profits during the first decade placed the col- 
ony out of debt, and probably saved it providentially from 
complete failure and perhaps extinction. During the most of 
the two following decades, the trade must have been profitable. 
Mr. Williamson in his History of Maine says **the emoluments 
and net gains must have exceeded considerably in the aggregate, 
£1600 sterling, to which is to be added the price of sale" 
(£400). This estimate is too low, even when we nmltiply the 
figures by eight to approximately express the difference between 
the value of a pound sterling in the early days of Plymouth and 
the purchasing power of a pound sterling to-day ; we are probably 
within bounds in assuming that the average income from the 
Kennebec during its occupancy by the colony was not far from 
$3000 a year, present value, or a total of about $100,000. 

For ninety years the Plymouth territory on the Kennebec lay 
idle and common. The trading-house became a rustic ruin, the 
stockade rotted and fell, saplings grew up in the esplanade, and 
in time the luxuriant forest resumed its sway over the spot where 
the Pilgrim Fathers had lodged and traded. During the inter- 
vals between the wars, traders from Sagadahoc sailed up with 
goods to the Indian haunts between Cushnoc and Ticonic, 
but their visits were transient ; and there were again no perma- 
nent white occupants of the old Plymouth tract until the new 
land company took possession. 



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54 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

The extent of the area originally granted to Plymouth was 
given without precision in the patent itself, though with definite- 
ness sufficient for the purposes of trade with the natives. Its 
southern limit was based upon the sti*eam that was then and is 
now called Cobbosseecontee, and its noilhern limit upon a rapid 
in the Kennebec about eighteen miles above, which was called 
by the natives Negumkeag ; the east and west lines were thirty 
miles apart and equally distant from the river. These were the 
true limits of the patent, but the overlapping titles from the 
Indians, and the sanction received from Cromweirs government, 
which extended Plymouth's political jurisdiction over the Saga- 
dahoc, encouraged the new proprietors to claim as theirs all the 
land within fifteen miles of the Kenneliec river from the sea 
inland indefinitely. They were encountered by i*ival claimants 
to the ledges of ancient Sagadahoc, and were finally restricted 
by the courts to a conventional limit between the present north 
lines of Topsham and Woolwich, and the pamllel of the south 
line of Anson and Madison.^ They built a fort against the 
French and Indiana in 1751 at Dresden, and another in 1754 on 
the site of the long-decayed tiiiding-house at Cushnoc ; they in- 
duced the Massachusetts government to design and paitly build 
a fortress at the mouth of the Sebasticook, eighteen miles above ; 
they divided the wilderness into townships, and then into lots, 
and invited people to come and settle ; settlers^ came with their 
axes, cleared the land, and converted the old fur-bearing patent 
into farms and villages. The history of the company which in 
the fullness of time thus succeeded to the estate of the colony of 
Plymouth on the river, and unlocked to civilization its magnifi- 
cent heritage, is worthy of a distinguished chapter by itself.*^ 
We have alluded to it merely to exhibit its succession to the own- 
ership of the Plymouth patent. The land titles that came from 
it cover one million five hundred thousand (1,500,000) acres, 
on which there are to-day four cities and some thirty-five towns, 
containing a population of not far from seventy thousand souls. 

» Survey of the State of Maine, by Moses Robert H. Gardiner. Me. Hist. Soc Coll., 
Greenleaf, p. 391 (1829). Vol. II, p. 269 (1847). 

» History of the Kennebec Pnrchase, by 



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THE PILGRIM FATHERS ON THE KENNEBEC. 55 

We have followed dimly, in the twilight of the earliest era of 
New England, the history of the Plymouth colony on the 
Kennebec. The patient reader who saw the rude shallop sail 
venturously up the river in 1625, now sees from its cargo of 
corn a wondeiful harvest of cities and towns on the tract that 
was then covered with forest and populous with Indians. The 
Pilgrim Fathers were led by their ideals to leave their native 
land for a home on the solitary shore of another continent, yet 
they were men of the earth, who grasped eagerly and very 
human-like after material things. They wore sagacious, shrewd, 
intensely devoted to their own worldly interests. They were 
swayed oftentimes by the spirit of greed that seemed to possess 
all tradei*s in their day, and they made many bargains with the 
natives which only the god of mammon could approve. Their 
general policy toward the Indians was gentle and humane, 
but they fell short in the performance of their higher duties 
toward them and humanity when called upon to help save the 
inhabitants of their own domain from the Mohawk. Such pro- 
tective action would have been the highest worldly wisdom, 
and would have saved the traffic on the Kennebec from utter 
ruin, and succeeding generations of colonists from, the legacy oi 
Indian hate and retribution that lasted as long as the tribe itself. 
We see the men of Plymouth here on the Kennebec, in peaked 
bats and work-day attire, with bronzed and bearded faces and 
buskined feet — Winslow, Bradford, Standish, Alden, Howland, 
Prince, and othere, before the halo of immortality had settled 
upon them — unconsciously working out with resolute hearts 
and calloused hands a mighty destiny ; governors and magis- 
trates are here, receiving in communal equality with their fellow 
freemen, without scandal or impropriety, the profits of their 
contracts with the little state which they govern ; and so pure 
and lofty are their motives that their every act seems invested 
with an almost Arcadian innocency. The Pilgrims' search for 
riches was to free themselves ft'om their pai*tnership. They 
were successful. The trade purchased their emancipation. The 
Kennebec was the savior of the colony, for without its timely 
munificence Now Plymouth would have sunk in its poverty and 
serfdom, and been lost to the memoiy of the centuries. 



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CHAPTER III. 
THE PLYMOUTH COMPANT. 

The local history of Augusta begins with the Pilgrim Fathers 
and their tniding-plant at the ancient Indian fishing-place of 
Kouissinock. The portion of Fort Western now venerably 
lingering in the midst of the city, on the spot where it was 
built in 1754 — in a recess of the wilderness — is the solitary suc- 
cessor of the palisaded truck-house which, in its day, had been 
raised on the ashes of ruined wigwams and dead council-fires. 

After fifty j^eara of demoralizing contact with the traders, the 
Kennebec Indians joined their fellow tribes of the Saco, the 
Androscoggin and the Penobscot in raising the hatchet against 
the English. Then began a war of races which lasted with 
occasional truces for a period of eighty-five years, ^ and retarded 
for that length of time the progress of civilization eastward of 
the Piscataqua. 

Of this long series of Indian wars, the last was the only one 
connected intimately with the Kennebec above Merry meeting 
bay, and immediately with the settlement of Augusta. 

The Pejepscot proprietary, a generation before the Plymouth 
company was formed, had seen its ancient totemic title-deeds 
drenched in the blood of massacred settlers and confirmed only 
by the might of arms in the dreadful counter-massacre at Nan- 
rantsouak.^ The Pejepscot war left the frontier of the settlers 

1 These wars may be enumerated from or five years* Indian war, 1745-1749 ; (6) 

the dates of their beginning to the dates of the French and Indian war, 1755-1760.— 

the several treaties of peace, as follows : See History of Maine, Williamson, 1 :499. 

(1) King rhUip's war, 1675-1678 ; (2) King « This (nnmerically the fourth era of In- 

William*s war, 1688-1699 ; (3) Queen An- dian hostilities in Maine) has frequently 

ae's war, 1703-1713 ; (4) the Pejepscot or been called by inexact writers the Rasle 

Kennebec war, 1722-1725 ; (5) the Spanish war, from Father Sebastian Basle, slain 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 57 

temporarily at the head of Swan Inland, where Fort Richmond 
was built as a defensible trading house. The Indians, broken 
in battle and reduced in number, but still unconquered in spirit, 
continued fatuously to cling to their ancestral river. Barred 
fix)m the abundance of their ancient clam-beds and fishing-coves 
on the coast, and frequently in distress for food, they bitterly 
brooded over the existence of the armed trading-post and guarded 
iealously the confines of their remaining hunting grounds and 
the yet undesecrated graves of their fathers. 

The tragedy known in history as the war of the Spanish suc- 
cession involved the Indians of Maine, through their French 
allies and manipulators in Canada, but had no special connection 
with any part of the river Kennebec, other than that the decla- 
rations of peace by the treaties of Halifax (August 15, 1749) 
and of Falmouth (with the Indians, Octol>er 16, 1749), encour- 
aged the formation of the Plymouth company. 

The scheme of imputing value to the scrawls of ancient saga- 
mores had effectively invested the Pejepscot company with the 
lands on the Androscoggin. The success of that operation 
quickly excited in other gentlemen of influence and enterprise a 
thirat for similar speculations. The tranquillity which immedi- 
ately followed the signing of the treaty of peace in 1725 was 
favorable both to the revival and growth of the suspended settle- 
ments and the conception of projects for the still farther advance 
of civilization in the province of Maine. 

The assumption of the Androscoggin territory by the Pejep- 
scot company was made possible by the firearms and soldiery 
of the colonial government. The few surviving natives, bereft 
of the counsel of their chief men and the example of the warriors 
^ho had been slain, abandoned the unequal contest and fled 

Angost 23, 1724; and sometimes the Love- Pejepscot war on the Kennebec. (See In- 
well war, from the fight at Piggwacket, dians of the Kennebec, in Ilinst. Hist, of 
May 8, 1725. It was in fact a war pro- Ken. Co. The Indians' deed is copied into 
Yoked solely 1^ the endeavor of the propri- Lapham*s History of Bethel, 1891, pp. 72- 
etors to settle the lands lying on the lower 74, and was signed by Wammbee, Danim- 
Kennebec and Androscoggin (which had kine, Wehickermett, Weedon, Damegan, 
been aoqnired by the Pejepscot company Neanongasett and Nnmbonewett ; it ran to 
through the deeds of Wammbee and others Richard Wharton.) 
in 1684), and should properly be called the 



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58 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

panic-stricken — some to the fastnesses of the far inland lakes 
and mountain gorges, and others to the villages of their compa- 
triots in Canada. They challenged no more the title of their 
conquerors to the valley of the lower Kennebec, and after a few 
yeai-s of timid isolation from the English they acquiesced with 
their more numerous and less sorely chastened brethren of the 
Penobscot in the gently couched but ambiguous and sweeping 
terms of the Dummer treaty of 1725 ; they agreed to live 
thenceforth in peace with the settlers — confirming to them the 
possession of all lands then claimed by them, and extending in- 
land (according to the understanding of the Indians) as far as 
the salt water flowed. Eichmond-fort became a friendly trad- 
ing-post again, and for twenty years hmger was looked upon 
by the Pejepscot proprietors and the natives mutually as indi- 
cating the boundary line of their respective domains. 

The Plymouth colony's territory on the Kennebec above Fort 
Eichmond had been in the full possession of the original occu- 
pants — ^the Indian^ and wild beasts — since its desertion by the 
purchasers, in 1661. Upon the installation of the Pejepscot 
company this abandoned proprietjiry bounded into imminent 
importance ; it was remembered that there had been a patent 
written in elaborate form on official parchment, bestowing a 
munificent franchise upon the ancient colony of New Plymouth ; 
this long-slumbering document was then immediately inquired 
for; the few and scattered descendants of John Winslow, 
Thomas Brattle, Edward Tyng and Antipas Boyes were solic- 
ited to search their several family chests for the missing docu- 
ment, which time had magically ripened into great prospective 
value ; but it could not be found. 

Antipas Boyes was a merchant of Boston ; in the records of Boston is the 
entry : '4659, Mr. Antipas Boyce & Mrs. Hannah HiU, dau. of Mr. Valentine 
Hill of Pascataqne or Dover were married 24th Jan. by John Endecott, Gov." 
They had a son Antipas who died unmarried. Antipas Boyes, senior, gave his 
share of the Plymouth purchase to Antipas and Samuel Marshall, who were 
grandsons through the marriage of his dau. with Thomas Marshall, cooper. 
Antipas Marshall sold his share to Charles Apthorp, Thomas Hancock, Syl- 
vester Gardiner, and John Jones (two-sixths each to the former and one-sixth 
each to the two latter ; Samuel Marshall sold a part of his interest to Fhinehas 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANf . 59 

Jones, and a part to one Benner from whom James BoWdoin, James Pitts and 
Benjamin Hallowell, purchased one forty-eighth part each. 

Thomas^ Brattle was living in Charlestown in 1656, bat removed the next 
jear to Boston; he married in 1656, Elizabeth, dan. of Capt. Wm. Tyng 
(brother of Edward) ; she died very suddenly at a wedding in her own house 
May 10, 1684, and he died April 5, following, leaving an estate valued at £7227 
IBs., lOd., — ^the largest estate at that time in New England; he was Captain in 
1656 of the Military company of the Massachusetts (now called the Ancient 
and Honorable Artillery Company) ; he was a valuable fHend to the colony; 
he loaned it £200, and in the first few months of King Philip's war (1675-78) 
he is credited with £1500 expended in behalf of the colony to carry it on ; he 
was one of the founders of the old South Church ; he was selectman of Bos- 
ton in 1671 and until 1688, and was prominent in town aflhlrs for many years ; 
some of his real estate was in Brattle street, which took its name flrom him. 
Seven children. 

1. Thomas' ; b. June 20, 1758 ; grad. Harv. Coll. 1676 ; he was one of the 
founders of the Brattle Street Church ; treasurer of Harv. Coll. for twenty- 
eight years; died May 18, 1718. 

2. Elizabeth'; b. Nov. 80, 1660; m. Nathaniel Oliyer. 

8. William*; b. Nov. 22, 1662; grad. Harv. Coll. 1680; ordained to the 
ministry at Charlestown in 1697; Nov. 8, 1697, m. Eliza Hayman; he died 
Feb. 15, 1717; his only child William, grad. Harv. Coll. in 1722; he was the 
Dather of Thomas, a graduate of the same college in 1760. 

4. Catharine*; b. Sept. 26, 1664; m. May 20, 1680, John Eyre, of Boston, 
merchant, b. Feb. 19, 1654; d. June 17, 1700; m. (2) Nov. 18, 1707, Waitslll 
Winthrop, b. Feb. 27, 1641 ; d. Nov. 17, 1717; he was son of Governor John 
Wlnthrop of CJonnectlcut, and grandson of Governor John Winthrop of the 
Massachusetts colony. 

5. Bethia* ; b. Dec. 18, 1666 ; m. to Joseph Parsons of Boston, merchant ; 
four children, all of whom died young ; the mother died July 4, 1690. 

6. Mary* ; b. Aug. 10, 1668 ; m. Aug. 20, 1689, to John Mico, merchant, 
who became a citizen of Boston about 1686, and died in October, 1718. 

7. Edward*; b. Dec. 18, 1670; m. March 28, 1692, Mary Legge, of Marble- 
head; he served as constable in 1696 in Boston, and was promoted to be cap- 
tain in the military company (in 1694) as his father had been before him ; 
aboat 1712 he settled in Marblehead * 'where he possessed considerable real 
estate, and acquired a high reputation as a successfhl and enterprising mer- 
chant;" he died Sept. 9, 1719 ; by his will, written Feb. 8, 1719, it appears that 
he owned vessels, land, houses, shop and goods therein, and warehouse, be- 
sides lands at *'Kennebeck, Quaboag and in ye Narragansetts." 

Through the Brattle fkmily's inheritance to a fourth part of the Plymouth 
purchase, Sylvester Gardiner and Florentius Vassal entered the company by 
purchasing the right of William* Brattle ; Jacob Wendell received his title 
ft-om Mary Brattle Mico, who *'left her" interest to him; Catharine* Brattle 
Eyre, on May 7, 1725 (her marriage name then being Winthrop), devised her 
Interest to her three children : John* Eyre, Catharine' Eyre Noyes, and Bethia* 
Eyre Walley ; Catharine' Eyre married (1) David Jefflries ; (2) Oliver Noyes ; 



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60 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

by her first marriage she had a son David* Jeflfries, to whom she conveyed her 
interest; John' Eyre sold his right to Gershom Flagg; Bethia' Eyre Walley 
had a son John* Walley, who took by derivation the interest of his mother; 
Elizabeth* Brattle Noyes' interest passed by purchase to Belcher Noyes, Na- 
thaniel Thwing, Benjamin Hallowell, and Sarah Smith. 

Edvjard Tyng^ was bom in Danstable, £ng.,in the year 1610; he was a 
brewer, afterwards a merchant; his name first appears in Boston Records, 
''Admitted to be an Inhabitant" of Boston, Nov. 29, 1689; he Joined the First 
Church, Jan. 30, 1640, and was admitted to be a fteeman June 2, 1640 ; he was 
a constable in 1642; selectman in 1645, 1648, and 1661; representative in 
1661 and 1662, and an assistant ftom 1668-1680 inclusive; he died Dec. 38, ~ 
1681, at Dunstable whither he moved in 1679; buried in the Chapel burial- 
ground, Boston. He married Mary Sears ; among his children were : 

1. Hannah' ; m. Hab^ah Savage of Boston and had a dan. Mary ; m. (2) 
Major-Gen. Gookin. 

2. Rebecca'; m. in 1669, Joseph Dudley, afterwards governor (1702-1715). 

3. Edward'; b. in Boston, March 26, 1649; Drake, in the Old Indian 
Chronicle, says: -'Before our men came up to take possession of the Fort 
[during the Narraganset expedition], the Indians shot three bullets through 
Capt. Davenport, whereupon, he bled eztreamly, and immediately called for 
his Lieutenant, Mr. Edward Tyng, and committed the charge of the company 
to him." In 1680, Lieut. Tyng removed to Falmouth (Portland) ; he was in 
command of Fort Loyal in 1680 and 1681 ; a councillor and magistrate under 
President Danforth ; in 1686 was one of the council of his brother-in-law, 
Gov. Joseph Dudley, and afterwards under Andros, who made him lieutenant- 
colonel ; he commanded in the province of Sagadahoc in 1688 and 1689 ; after 
Nova Scotia was conquered he was made Governor of Annapolis, and on his 
voyage to that colony he was taken by the French and carried to France, 
where he died ; administration on his estate was granted to his brother Jona- 
than, in April, 1701. Soon after his removal to Falmouth he married Eliza- 
beth Clark, dau. of Thaddeus Clark. Children: (1) Edward', b. 1683; he be- 
came distinguished in the naval service ; was appointed Commodore of the 
squadron A*om Massachusetts in the attack on Louisburg in 1745, and in the 
province brig of twenty-four guns, captured the French ship Vigilantj of 
sixty-four guns; he died in Boston Sept. 8, 1755 ; he left a son Edward* who 
died in England unmarried ; (2) Jonathan' died young ; (3) Mary', m. Rev. 
John Fox* of Woburn ; their dau. Mary Fox, m. Rev. Habyah Weld who was 
a great-grandson of Edward* through his dau. Hannah' who m. HabJijah Sav- 
age, and their dau. Mary Savage was Rev. Thomas Weld's second wife and 
the mother of Rev. Habijah Weld; (4) Elizabeth; m. brother of Dr. Be^j. 
Franklin. 

4. Jonathan'; b. in Boston, Dec. 15, 1642, m. (1) Sarah, dan. of Hezekiah 
Usher; m. (2) Sarah, widow of Humphrey Davie of Woburn; m. (3) Judith, 

* Their seoond son Jabez (b. in Woburn, citizen ; his son John's dan. Caroline, m. 
May 25, 1705 ; d. April 7, 1775) removed to John Potter (1787-1866), an early and wor- 
Falmonth abont 1743, and was a prominent thy citizen of Angnsta. 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 61 

daa. of John Raynor. Jonathan Tyng's name is perpetuated in Tyng's Island 
in the Merrimack, above Lowell, Mass. 

5. Mary*. 6. Elizabeth*. 

Edward* Tyug devised his part of the Plymouth patent to his wife, and she, 
Dec. 28, 1700, devised the same to four of her children (Edward*; Jonathan*; 
Mary* ; Elizabeth* ; their interests seem to have descended to the children of 
Edward* ; Jonathan' died young, and his share went to his brother and two 
slaters ; Edward' sold part of his share to William Bowdoln ; Mary' sold her 
interest to John Goodwin ; Elizabeth' sold half of her share to Jabez Fox, 
Jonathan Fox, Jonathan Reed, and Samuel Fowle. 

John Wxnslow was bom April 16, 1597, at Droitwich, England; he was the 
eldest brother of Edward who came in the Mayfioioer; John came in the For- 
tune in 1621 ; he was m. at New Plymouth Oct. 12, 1624, to Mary Chilton, dau. 
of James Chilton, one of the Mauflower pilgrims ; he became through the 
natural force of his character a leading man in the colony ; after trading re- 
lations were established with the Indians on the Kennebec (1628), he came in 
person to Cushnoc yearly in the spring when the river had opened to naviga- 
tion and living in the truck-house bartered with the natives during the traf- 
flcing season; he was humane at heart and regarded the Indians as members 
of God*s family and won generally their good-will and confidence, but like 
similar Christian merchants of that day (as in all other days when dealing 
with a lower race of their fellow men,) his conscience had little employment 
in his Indian trade transactions and effected no reduction in the profits; he 
was the most competent person in the colony to conduct the Kennebec trade, 
and that he did it successAilly is shown by the large income which for at least 
twenty years the colony received A*om it. John was indeed no less useftil to 
the colony than his brother Edward, but his service was of another kind— he 
stayed in this country and found the money which was necessary to meet the 
obligations of the colony and keep it A*om fatal bankruptcy while Edward la- 
bored in England to keep the favor of its great patrons and the leniency of its 
creditors. Sometimes John managed the Indian trade as the agent of the 
colony, and sometimes with others he *' farmed it," by paying for the mon- 
opoly an agreed price for a tierm of years. His familiarity with the region, 
his acquaintance with the Indians and his confidence that the former volume 
of trade could in great part be regained, induced him to become a Joint pur- 
chaser of the patent, although the local Indians were at war with the Iroquois 
and the Freuch traders at Quebec were competing boldly for the Kennebec 
peltry. In 1656, five years previous to his purchase of a part of the patent, 
Winslow removed to Boston, where he engaged in business as a merchant, 
and was admitted a ft-eeman of Massachusetts in 1672; he died in 1674; his 
widow died in 1679. John Winslow sold two-fifths of his part of the Ply- 
mouth purchase to Thomas Temple, and two-fif ihs to John JoUiffe ; the latter de- 
vised his interest to Martha Balston, who sold to James Bowdoin and John 
Valentine. Bowdoin devised to James and William Bowdoin and Mary Bay- 
ard's children. John Jones acquired an interest A*om Valentine ; and General 
John Winslow derived his interest fjrom his great-grand uncle John — the 
brother of his great-grandfather Governor Edward Winslow. (York Deeds, 
Book X, Folios 185-6.) 



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62 BISTORT OF AUGUSTA. 

The inquiry for the coveted missing document continued dili- 
gently for fourteen years, and until the most interested and 
sanguine of the seekers began to despair of ever finding the 
object of their quest; but finally » in 1741, it was learned that 
an obscure aged dame proudly possessed, and kept in great' 
secrecy, a mysterious manuscript roll, yellow with years and of 
supposed impoitance. This, on investigation, was found to be 
the original semi-royal patent to the pilgrim'colon}'- of Plymouth 
— the fundamental, long sought for credential of the heirs to the 
Kennebec lands. It is said that the venerable custodian would 
not willingly part with her unique treasure^-either because it 
had been lodged with her in honorable trust, or for other reason ; 
but it was in the course of time wrested from her by stratagem 
— often another name for theft — and finally delivered through 
. the hands of Samuel Wells, one of the commissioners for set- 
tling the bounds between the colony of Plymouth and that of 
Rhode Island, into the possession of the proper holders — ^the 
legal heirs and assigns of the purchasers of the patent in 1661.* 

After this long preliminary process of search and seizure, and 
having possession of the original patent as firm ground to stand 
upon, beside several auxiliary or concurrent Indian deeds cover- 
ing nearly the same territory, the Plymouth company was 
formed. The first meeting was held under a warrant from 
"John Storer, Esq., one of His Majesty's Justices of the Peace 
for the County of York," at the Royal Exchange Tavern, King 
street, in Boston, on the 2Ist day of September, 1749. Nine 
of the heirs attended, viz. : Edward Winslow, Robert Temple, 
Henry Laughton, Jacob Wendell, Thomas Valentine, John Ben- 
ner, Samuel Goodwin, John Fox and Joseph Gooch. This 
number was afterwards more than quadrupled by newly-found 
heirs and purchasers of rights. 

The four shares of the ancient purchasers of the Plymouth 
Colony's Kennebec Patent, many times divided and subdivided 
by devise, inheritance or purchase, came to be represented in 
the Plymouth Company by the following groups : 

« The Frontier Missionary, p. 247. 



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THE PLTMOUTH COMPANY, 



63 



Ahtipas Boyea' Estate, 



Charles 


Apthorp, 






Thomas 


Hancock, 


James 


Bowdoin, 






John 


Jones (Boston), 


Sylvester 


Gardiner, 






Phinehas 


Jones (Bonner hrs), 


BeDJamlQ 


Hallowell, 






James 


Pitts. 






Thomas BraUle'a Estate. 




William 


Brattle, 






Sarah 


Smith, 


Gershom 


Flagg, 






Nathaniel 


Thwing, 


Sylvester 


Gardineii 






Florentius 


Vassal, 


Bei^amin 


Hallowell, 






John 


Walley, 


David 


Jeflfrles, 






Jacob 


Wendell. 


Belcher 


Noyes, 














Edward Tynr/s Estate. 




William 


Bowdoin, 






Jonathan 


Reed, 


Samuel 


Fowle. 






Nathan 


Stone, 


Jabez 


Fox, 






John 


Tufts, 


Jonathan 


Fox, 






Edward 


Tyng, 


John 


Goodwin (heirs 


of), 


Habijah 


Weld. 


Samuel 


Goodwin, 














John 


Winslow's Estate. 




Bartholomew 


r Bayard, 






John 


Jones (Concord), 


Mary 


Bayard (children of) 


Robert 


Temple, ' 


James 


Bowdoin, 






Thomas 


Valentine, 


William 


Bowdoin, 






John 


Wlnslow. 



In 1753 an act of incorporation was obtained under the name : 
**The Proprietors of the Kennebec Purchase from the late Colony 
of New Plymouth." The headquarters were fixed at Boston, 
where the records were kept and where the meetings were 
usually held until the extinguishment of the company in 1816. 

Such was the genesis of the great land company whose ear- 
liest act as a business undertaking was to overawe the protesting 
Indians in order to extend the conquest of civilization from 
Fort Richmond to the Canadian line. For eightj* years the 
Indians had contested with their tomahawks the encroachments 
of civilization upon their hunting grounds in Maine ; truces and 
treaties had often been agreed to and all save the latest one had 
been broken. Shall not that one alone bo kept? The brute 
quality that blindly dominates the unintellectual savage, and 
which civilization has never yet wholly bred out of any man, 
gives the inevitable answer. Two stranger races — one strong 



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64 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

and the other weak — cannot live long in peace and comity where 
they touch.* 

The Plymouth company was a remarkable group of gentlemen 
who had become associated by an affinity of birth and heritage ; 
they moved in the highest business, professional and social circles 
in the colony ; some were liberally educ^ited, and a few were 
wealthy ; there were among them strong, sturdy, imperious 
men, who outwardly in a manner simulated the English aristoc- 
racy, and who probably in their day-dreams built manor houses 
after the models of those they had seen in the mother country, 
and peopled their imaginary estates with a yankeeized peasant- 
ry. Such as these remained loyal to King George when the 
storm of the Revolution burst upon the country'. Through the 
great influence of the company's distinguished members, as well 
as through its laudable purpose of adding a new settlement in a 
fair section of the colony's distant domain, the Kennel)ec enter- 
prise found great favor with the colonial government. Gov- 
ernor Shirley especially was its patron and promoter, and could 
not have shown more anxiety for its success if he himself had 
been a member of the company. 

James Botodoin, on the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685), among the 
Huguenot or protestant refugees fjroin France who took reftige in America, 
was Pierre* Baudouin, a physician, who sailed Arom Rochelle with his wife 
and four children (James and John and two daughters), and landed at Casco, 
now Portland, in 1688. The family narrowly escaped massacre by the Indians 

s In a conference at Richmond-fort, Sep- commissioners exhibited Indian deeds of 

tember 28, 1753, between the Norridgewock lands above, the Indians denied any knowl- 

Indians and a commission deputised by edge of such conveyances. Ongewasgone 

Governor Shirley, consisting of Sir William said ** I am an old man, and never heard 

Pepperell, Jacob Wendell, Thomas Hab- any of them [his ancestors] say these lands 

bard, John Winslow and James Bowdoin, were sold." And they all said what was 

the Chief Quenois said : *' Here is a river probably too true : " We don*t think these 

belonging to us ; you have lately built a deeds are false, bat we think yon got the 

new garrison here [Fort Shirley] ; we wish Indians drmik, and so took the advantage 

yon would be content to go no farther np of them, when you bought the lands.** In 

the river than that fort. We live wholly by the same conference, after the other basi- 

this land and Live bat poorly ; the Penob- ness was finished, the chief said : ** I would 

scots hunt on one side of us, and the Cana- say one word more. Our young men are 

da Indians on the other side ; therefore do very apt to get drunk ; we desire you would 

not turn us off this land. We are willing give orders to Captain Lithgow not to let 

you should enjoy all the lands from the any one of them have any more rum than 

new fort and so downwards." When the one quart in two days !** 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 65 

who destroyed the settlement in 1690. Having fled ftom the bloody bigotry 
of christianized France to the supposed safety of the wilds of Maine, the har- 
ried exiles foond the latter equally inhospitable; the torture-chamber and 
stake had been exchauged for the savages* tomahawk and scalping-knlfe ; they 
saved their lives by flight to Boston, where the father died previous to 1717. 
The son James' became a thrifty merchant and laid the foundations of the 
fortunes of the family ; he died in 1747, at the age of seventy-one years,^ leav- 
ing the sons ( James' and William'). This son James* was the Kennebec 
proprietor of 1753, at the organization of the Plymouth Company; he became 
eminent by his services in the war of the Revolution ; he was Governor of the 
Commonwealth two years (1785-'87). Mr. North in his history of Augusta 
says (page 286) : ''We believe him [Governor Bowdoin] to have been the 
most efficient and influential proprietor in causing the limits of the Kennebec 
Patent to be extended and established and its titles confirmed." Governor 
Bowdoin had two children; a son Jame8^ born Sept. 22, 1762, was the Ply- 
mouth proprietor of 1796 ; he became a munificent patron of Bowdoin College 
by gifts of lands, apparatus, and money in his lifetime, and at his death by 
making it a residuary legatee; by his death in 1811, the college came into 
possession of his valuable library and collection of pictures ; ftom him the 
college received its name. He was the largest share-owner in the Plymouth 
company. James^ Bowdoin m. a daughter of his Uncle William who was his 
father's half brother; he died childless, and his widow m. General Henry 
Dearborn (1761-1829). The male line is extinct, but the name has been re- 
vived by a descendant of the female line. 

Qershom Flagg was a descendant of Thomas Flagg (or Fl egg) of Water- 
town, the emigrant ancestor of many families of that name in America. 
Thomas came to Massachusetts in 16S7, fjrom Scratby in the Hundred of East 
Flegg, Norfolk county, England. Gershom is connected with the history of 
Aagu.sta both as a Plymouth proprietor and as ancestor of the Flagg, North, 
Bridge and Fuller families; he was born. in Boston, Oct. 20, 1705. At the re- 
building of Fort Richmond on the Kennebec in 1740, he was employed to do 
the glazing, and was also connected with the work of building Fort Halifax 
In 1764; when Governor Pownal went to the Penobscot in 1769 to build Fort 
Pownal, Flagg accompanied him as a contractor for a part of the work. He 
is mentioned in Pownal*s journal as having completed at Falmouth some 
necessary preparations for his work. 

In the division of the Plymouth company's lands in March, 1764, lot num- 
ber eight, Winslow's plan, west side of the river, fell to Gershom* Flagg. On 
this lot stands now the central part of the City or Augusta— that part lying 
between Winthrop and Bridge streets, and extending a mile westerly fjrom 
the river. Gershom Flagg^s home in Boston was on Hanover street, where 
the American House now stands; he removed to Harvard, Mass., where he 
lived some years in the house afterwards called the Bromfield house. His 
lands on the Kennebec made him wealthy, as they had developed somewhat 

• His portrait, as well as those of his son Bandouin was anglicized into Bowdoin soon 
and grandson, hangs in the Bowdoin Col- after the emii^rant Pierre (Peter) arrived in 
lege art gallery, at Bmnswick. The name this conntry. 



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66 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

of their valae daring his lifetime. He died suddenly in Boston, March 23, 
1771.' 

Gershom Flagg m. (1) March 16, 1780, Lydla Callender, dan. of Bev. E. Cal- 
lender, a minister of the Baptist denomination; she died childless, and he m. 
(2) Hannah Pitson, dau. of James Pitson, merchant, of Boston, who was ad- 
mitted inhabitant Nov. 10, 1714. Children : 

1 Ebeuezer,* b. Oct. 80. 1737 ; d. yoang. 

2 James,' b. Oct. 28, 1739 ; d. in the West Indies in 1775, unmarried. He 
was a merchant; came to the Kennebec in 1762, and settled on a five acre lot 
in Gardinerston ; removed to Boston and f^om thence to the West Indies. 

3 Hannah,^ b. Nov. 27, 1741; m. Aug. 28, 1764, Joseph North of Augusta; 
she d. Feb. 10, 1819. She was a lady of great force of character— generous, 
benevolent and beloved ; she set the example which has been uninteiTuptedly 
followed by daughters in two generations of her descendants, of providing a 
thanksgiving dinner for the piisoners in the county Jail. (See Bridge family.) 

4 Gershom,' b. Sept. 1, 1748; m. (I) Feb. 10, 1773, Sally Pond of Dedham, 
Mass.; she d. Apr. 27, 1778; m. (2) Nov. 25, 1779, Abigail Bigelow of Wal- 
tham. He lived in Lancaster, Mass., afterwards in Clinton, Me. ; he was 
killed in a mill yard at Clinton by logs rolling upon him. His sons, Gershom,' 
James' and George.' lived and died in Clinton ; his son Jacob' removed from 
Sherburne, Mass., to Augusta in 1819; he lived here until 1854, when he re- 
turned to Sherburne, leaving his name to Flagg street. 

6 Elizabeth,' b. Aug. 13, 1746; m. (1) Capt. Henry Wells; m. (2) Rev. Ja- 
cob Bigelow of Sudbury, Mass., who grad. Harv. Coll. in 1766, and d. Sept. 
12 :816. 

9 Mary,' b. Oct. 25, 1760; m. (1) Dr. Joslah Wilder of Lancaster, Mass.; 
m. (2) Dr. Isaac Hurd of Concord, Mass. 

7 Grizzell' Apthorp, b. May 2, 1753; m. July 19, 1781, Capt. Ber\jamln Gould 
of Lancaster, afterwards of Newburj-port; d. May 30, 1841. There were born 
to them seven children, one of whom — Hannah Flagg Gould (b. Sept. 3, 1789, 
d. Sept. 5, 1865) — was a ft-equent contributor to periodical literature; she 
published several volumes of poems; also of prose sketches, which, like her 
poems, were popular at that time. Another daughter, Esther Gould, (b. Oct. 
3, 1785, d. July 26, 1866) m. Jan. 5, 1806, Henry W. Fuller of Augusta, b. 1784, 
d. Jan. 29, 1841. (See Fuller family.) 

Sylvpster Gardiner, who was the master spirit of the Plymouth company, 
fi*om its inception until the war of the revolution paralyzed for awhile its 
operations, was a descendant in the fourth generation Arom Joseph* Gardiner 
who emigrated from England and settled in Rhode Island ; Joseph* was the 
father of Benoiii,* Benoni' of William,' and William' of Sylvester,* who was 
bom at South Kingston, R. I., in 1707; he fitted himself for the practice of 
medicine, studying eight years in Edinburgh and Paris, under the patronage 
of his brother-in-law. Rev. Dr. McSparreu ; he entered upon his professional 
career in Boston, and his income flrom fees was swelled into a large fortune 
by the profits which he realized from the importation of drugs from Europe 
which he furnished at wholesale for the use of the medical faculty of the colo- 

7 North's History of Augusta, 1870. 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 67 

Dies. His wealth enabled him to acquire a twelfth part of the ancient Ply- 
moQth purchase ; it is said that at one time he owned no less than one hundred 
thousand acres of land in Maine ; his efforts to settle these lands were vigor- 
ous and unceasing for a quarter of a century. 

Dr. 6ardiuer*s name first appears on the records of the Plymouth company 
at a meeting held Dec. 6, 1761 ; he was chosen moderator at the fourth meet- 
ing of the company, held Oct. 17, 1752, and continued by adjournments until 
Sept. 12, 1753; in Jan., 1764, he was again chosen moderator, and continued 
as such until April 26, 1775, when his attendance at the meetings ended. The 
company having early determined to make its first plantation in the township 
of Frankfort, Dr. Gardiner boldly undertook the enterprise of laying for him- 
self the foundations of another town at Cobbosseecontee ; he selected that 
choice place primarily because of the plenitude and availability of its water 
powers for the running of mills to grind the grain and saw the lumber of the 
inhabitants; he received ft*om the company in December, 1764, the falls and a 
part of the land which forms the present territory of Gardiner— not as a gift 
but as a portion of what he would be entitled to in the future divisions of the 
company's land. In a few years he completed there two saw-mills, a grist- 
mill, ftilling-mill, potash factory, wharf, stores, and many dwelling houses. 
The village thereupon took the name Gardinerston. He built a sloop which 
he kept constantly sailing between Boston and the Kennebec (in summer), 
and the Sheepscot (in winter) — the winter service being by special agreement 
with the company, he receiving therefor the subsidy of a tract of land on the 
Sheepscot river. 

The company having granted Dr. Gardiner four hundred acres of land on 
Eastern river (where now is Dresden village), he built houses and mills and 
cleared land for a farm there; he also cleared land for farms and built houses 
at the Chops, at Lynde*s island. Swan island, Pittston and Winslow. These 
enterprises gave great stimulus to the settlements ; for many years the grist 
mill at Gardinerston was the only one on the Kennebec, and sometimes set- 
tlers journeyed thirty miles from the interior with their bags of grain upon 
their backs, or in boats on the river, to get their grists ground.** 

The Plymouth company's title to lands east of the Kennebec and towards the 
lower part of its territory being disputed by other proprietors, and the com- 
pany not being able to warrant in its corporate capacity, or to sell them with- 
out warranty, Dr. Gardiner undertook this responsibility for it, which proved 
troublesome to himself and vexatious to his heirs. The company conveyed to 
him large tracts of land on each side of Sheepscot river, and he gave two 
bonds, each in the penal sum of £20,000 sterling, to sell and account with them 
for the proceeds. The revolutionary war interrupted the business, and he had 
no opportunity after its close to complete it before his decease. The company 
commenced suits on the bonds against his executors, which, after being in 
court some years, were submitted to referees, who, after deliberating seven 
years, decided that, so far ft*om anything being due from Dr. Gardiner's estate 

8 As late as 1775, and until a grist mill Canaan (now Skowhegan) were obliged to 
was bailt on the Sebastioook (now Wins- go to Gardinerston to mill. (Hanson's 
low), the settlers at Norridgewock and History of Norridgewock and Canaan.) 



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68 raSTOllY OF AUGUSTA. 

to the company, there remained a balance of more than three thousand five 
hundred dollars due from it to him, which they decided should be paid his 
heirs, and that they should reconvey to the company the fragments of lands 
not sold, and that thn company should restore to them certain bonds ftom 
settlers taken for portions of these lands, and which were in its possession. 
The company also agreed to refund to the heirs nearly two thousand dollars, 
which they had been obliged to pay on account of their warranties. 

Dr. Gardiner was a member and liberal patron of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and he made speedy efforts to plant it on the soil of the Plymouth 
company ; by his personal exertions, gifts and endowment, St. John's Church 
was established at Fi*ankfort-on-the-Kennebec, and the Rev. Jacob Bailey 
(1731-1818), its pastor for nineteen years, concludes one of his letters written 
to the Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts, London, £ng., in 
the ye&r 1766, with ** a Detail of the great Things Dr. Gardiner, a Physician of 
Boston, has done, and is doing, for the Church of England in these Parts ; 
particularly his generosity in giving the People of Pownalborough [formerly 
Frankfort] the use of Bichmond House [Fort Richmond] and Farm seven 
Years, for Mr. Bailey's Improvement ; his subscribing largely, and soliciting 
a Subscription for building them a Church [St. John*8 Church] and Parsonage 
House ; his publishing, at his own Expense, an Edition of Bishop Beveridge's 
Sermon on the Excellency of the Common Prayer which has been dispensed 
to good Purpose ; his intention to give a Glebe, build a Church and Parson- 
age House, and endow it for the support of an Episcopal Minister at Gardner's 
Town." Dr. Gardiner planted also St. Ann's Church at Gardinerston in 1771, 
giving it ten acres of laud for a glebe, and in his last will and testament he 
endowed it with £28 sterling annually, for the minister." 

The evidence is uniformly that Dr. Gardiner was a man of broad and liberal 
views, of great zeal, energy and public spirit. His principles, tastes and 
prejudices inclined ^him to remain loyal to the royal cause in the war of the 
revolution, for which he suffered sorely in spirit and disastrously in estate. 
In Boston he was much respected by all classes ; he entertained as guests such 
distinguished men as Sir William Pepperell, Governor Hutchinson, Earl Per- 
cy, Admiral Graves, Major Pitcairn, General Gage, Major Small, and others ; 
he was an Addresser of the Royal Governors in 1774, and in 1775 he sided ag- 
gressively with the royal cause; he was reluctant to quit his native country, 

B The executors of Dr. Gardiner's will was used until supplanted by the present 

performed his wishes, and a one-story wood church edifice, the comer stone of which 

church building was erected on the spot was laid May 31st, 1819. When Gardiner 

since occupied by the Episcopal vestry, was incorporated (1803) from the original 

Gardiner ; it had a steeple surmounted by territory of Pittston, the name of St. 

a large gilt sturgeon or cabbaaaa; the win- Ann's Church and parish was dlscontln- 

dows were arched in the fashion of the ned, and that of *' Christ Church in Gardi- 

modem churches ; the vane and bell were ner" substituted for it. The income of 

given by William Gardiner, the testator's the sum bequeathed by Br. Gardiner, 

son. In 1793 this church was set on fire by amounting to about $125 annually, is still 

a maniac named Henry McCausLand, and expended according to the terms of the 

destroyed ; it was soon replaced by a new will, in support of the resident Episcopalian 

building erected on the same spot, which clergyman. 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 69 

but he yielded finally to the counsel—to what has been termed the <*impetu- 
osity''— of a young wife, and in his old age was wrecked in fortune, and 
became an exile under the proscription and banishment act of 1778; he 
lived for a few years at Poole, England. His property, both real and personal, 
which he left behind him in the colonies was condemned to confiscation, and 
he was reduced to comparative poverty. 

The proscription and banishment act remained in force until the adoption of 
the first treaty of peace, made November 80, 1782, which provided that Con- 
gress should recommend the States to provide for the restitution of all prop- 
erty that had been confiscated from those who had not borne arms against the 
United States, and that all other refugees should have liberty to go to any 
part of the country and remain a year unmolested, and use what endeavors 
they could to obtain their property ; it provided that Congress should recom- 
mend the States to restore all estates when the original owners should pay 
the bonajide price received for them after their confiscation, and that all who 
should have any interest in confiscated lands, either by debts, marriage set- 
tlements, or otherwise, should be allowed to prosecute their claims and obtain 
their rights without impediment. Dr. Gardiner wrote to his associates in the 
Plymouth company: ** April 10, 1788. There is now an entire change in our 
ministry, which you will hear of before this reaches you, and with them most 
likely a change of political measures. • God grant us all grace to put an end to 
this devouring war, so contrary to our most holy religion ; and unite us all 
once more In that bond of peace and brotherly union, so necessary to the hap- 
piness of both countries, which God grant may soon take place, and give us 
all an opportunity once more to greet one another as fdends." *® 

In 1785, Dr. Gardiner returned to the United States, and resumed the prac- 
tice of medicine and surgery, locating at Newport, Rhode Island. For a 
part of his looses, he petitioned Massachusetts for compensation. He had 
never borne arms, he said, nor entered into any association, combination, or 
subscription against the whigs ; when he quitted Boston, he stated, too, that 
he had in possession a valuable stock of drugs, mediciues, paints, groceries, 
and dye-stuffs, which, having a vessel fblly equipped and entirely under his 
control, he could easily have carried off, but which he left, of choice, for the 
benefit of the country, which he knew was in need. The claim was acknowl- 
edged to the extent of giving his heirs tickets in the state land lottery, by 
which they obtained nearly six thousand acres in Washington county, Maine. 
Creneral Washington, on taking possession of Boston, ordered the medicines, 

ioUpdike*s Histoxy of the Episcopal 1857; Biog. Sketches of Loyalists of the 

Church in Narragansett. For this sketch Am. Revolation, by Lorenzo Sabine, 1864; 

of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner recourse has History of Angasta, by James W. North, 

been had also to the following named p. 289, 1870; Rev. Asa Dalton, D. D., in 

authorities : Robert Halloweli Gardiner's Froc. Me. Hist. Soc., 2d series, 1 : 295, 1890. 

chapter on the Kennebec Purchase, Me. In Christ Church, Gardiner, there is a tab- 

Hist. Soc. Coll., 2:279, 1847; History of let of black marble on the wall near the 

Gardiner, Pittston and West Gardiner, by pnlpit, in memory of Dr. Sylvester Oardi- 

J. W. Hanson, 1892; The Frontier Mis- ner. The inscription, in both Latin and 

sionary, by Wm. S. BartLett, 1853 ; Wm. English, is printed in Hanson's History of 

WiUis, in Me. Hut. Soc. CoU., 5:11, Gardiner. 



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70 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

etc., in Dr. Gardiner's store to be transferred to the hospital department of 
the continental army, which was done. The Commonwealth did not profit any 
f^om Dr. Gardiner's lands on the Kennebec, because the attorney-general 
found his first suit illegally prosecuted, and because peace was concluded 
while his second action was pending. 

Dr. Gardiner died at Newport, Rhode Island, August 8, 1786, and his remains 
were interred under Trinity Church of that place. By his will, which was 
elaborately drawn and executed with four codicils attached, in April and May 
of the year of his death, he* bequeathed the most of his real estate in Maine to 
his daughter Hannah's only son, Robert Hallowell, on condition that the latter 
should extend his name by adding to it the surname of the testator." John 
Gardiner, the eldest son, failed to become the principal heir by reason of his 
political and religions opinions, which were antagonistic to those of his vener- 
able father, and William ** was not an efficient man." 

Dr. Sylvester Gardiner m. (1) Anne Gibbons, dan. of Dr. John Gibbons of 
Boston, and had six children; m. (2) Abigail Eppes of Virginia; m. (8) 
Catharine Goldthwaite. Children : 

1 John, b. 1731 ; m. Margaret Harris of South Wales ; maternal grandpa- 
rents of Llewellyn W. Lithgow of Augusta. 

2 William: lived and died in Gardiner; unmarried; lies buried beneath the 
vestry of Christ Church in Gardiner. 

3 Anne ; m. John Brown, second soir of the • Earl of Altamont. Children : 
(1) John, m. Lord Howe*8 daughter; (2) James; (3) another son; (4) Ann; 
(5) Louisa. 

4 Hannah ; m. Robert Hallowell ; they were the parents of Robert Hallowell 
(Gardiner), senior, and the ancestors of descendants in the sixth generation 
from Dr. Sylvester Gardiner; John T. Richards, Adjt. Gen. of Maine, 1897- 
1902, is of the fifth generationJ 

5 Rebecca; m. Philip Dumaresque. 

6 Abigail ; m. Oliver Whipple of Cumberland, R. I. ; afterwards a lawyer 
in Portsmouth, N. H. He published a poem dedicated to President John 
Adams. 

Benjamin^ Hallowell^ shipwright, of Boston, son of Benjamin* and Mary 
(Stocker) Hallowell, was born in Boston, January 20, 1699; he m., May 20, 
1722, Rebecca Briggs, by whom he had two sons — Robert* and Benjamin* — 
who became prominent citizens and were conspicuous for their adherence to 
the royal side in the war of Independence. Beivjamin* was born February 2, 
1725; m. June 13, 1746, Mary Boylston. At the beginning of the Revolution 
Benjamin* was a member of the boai*d of commissioners of customs at Boston, 
and when he accepted, in addition, the office of mandamus councillor, he be- 
came a special object of public indignation ; on the 10th of March, 1776, he 
fled from the presence of the popular wrath to Halifax, with his family, and in 
the following July sailed for England. While in Halifax he wrote in a letter : 

11 The entire will is printed in Hanson's well, the yoanger, of Boston, in the comity 

History of Gardiner. March 11, 1802, a of Suffolk, gentleman, shall he allowed to 

special act was passed by the Massachusetts take the name of Robert Hallowell Gardi- 

Legislature, enacting "that Robert Hallo- ner," 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 71 

** If I can be of the least service to either army or navy, I will stay in America 
antil this Rebellion is sabdaed ;" it appears A*oni another letter that he*fre- 
qaently tendered himself to the (British) commander-in-chief, without snc- 
cess.^' In the antamn of 1796, Mr. Hallowell returned to Boston, accompanied 
by his daughter, Mrs. Elmesley, and by her husband, who had been appointed 
Chief-justice of Upper Canada. The party were the guests of Robert Hallo- 
well; the odium which had previously attached to Benjamin^ through his 
official relation to the crown was apparently forgotten, as he was received by 
his former townsmen with kindness and hospitality. He accompanied his 
daughter and son-in-law to their home in Upper Canada, and died at York in 
1799. He was the last survivor of the royal board of commissioners ; the 
British government granted him lands in Manchester and two other towns in 
Nova Scotia, and a township in Upper Canada which bears his name. He was 
one of the lai^est shareholders in the Plymouth company. When the town- 
ship of Hallowell was incorporated (April 26, 1771) his name was conferred 
upon it, and is thus perpetuated on the Kennebec; he was proscribed and ban- 
ished in 1778, and included In the conspiracy act a year later; his country 
residence at Jamaica Plain was used as a hospital by the continental army 
during the siege of Boston ; and his pleasure grounds were converted into a 
place of burial for soldiers who died. This property was seized and sold by 
the Commonwealth, but as the fee was in Mrs. Hallowell, her heirs sued to 
recover of the person who held under the deed of the Commissioners of Con- 
fiscation, and obtained Judgment in 1803, in the United States Circuit Court. 
The possession of Mr. Hallowell's tract of thirty-two hundred acres, lying 
between the Kennebec river and Cobbosseecontee Great Pond, and mostly 
within the limits of the present territory of Hallowell, was in due time resumed 
by his heirs under legal forms. Among Benjamins and Mary (Boylstou) Hallo- 
well's children was Sarah, the eldest daughter, who m. Samuel Vaughan, a 
London merchant; their sons, Charles and Benjamin Vaughan, located in 
Hallowell — the former in 1796 — on farms cleared flrom their maternal grand- 
father's estate; also Briggs Hallowell, a son of the Plymouth proprietor, was 
a temporary settler on the inherited domain ; his house was near the mouth of 
Bombahook (Vaughan) brook. Rebecca, a sister of Charles and Benjamin 
Vanghan, m. in 1798, John Merrick (1766-1861) who thenceforth was a citizen 
of Hallowell. 

Bev. John Hancock, son of Nathaniel and Mary (Prentice) Hancock of 
Cambridge, was bom March 1, 1671, and grad. Harv. Coll. in 1689 ; he taught 
school in Cambridge in 1691, but November 2, 1698, he was ordained to the 
gospel ministry at Lexington, then called ** Cambridge Farms,'* settled over 
the church there and continued as its pastor until his decease, which occurred 
December 6, 1752 ; he m. Elizabeth, dau. of Rev. Thomas Clark of Chelmsford ; 
their eldest son was John, bom June 1, 1702, and died May 7, 1744, who was 
the father of John Hancock, Governor of Massachusetts, president of the 
Continental Congress, and the first signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Thomas Hancock, another son of the Rev. John, became one of the wealthiest 

^ The Loyalists of the American Revolution, by Lorenzo Sabine (1864). 



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72 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

merchants in the province. He was a bookseller in Boston, and, dying August 
1, l7(>d) bequeathed to his nephew, John, more than fifty thousand pounds 
sterling, besides the reversion of twenty thousand pounds at the decease of 
his widow, a dau. of Daniel Henchman, in whose bookstore Thomas had been 
a clerk. 

John Jonea^^ was the only one of the original members of the Plymouth 
company who removed his home to Hallowell and undertook to share person- 
ally the fortunes of the pioneer settlers of the town ; he was born in 1748 ; no 
account of his early life has ever been written, but his parentage was mani- 
festly of the semi-patrician quality common in the last years of the colonies, 
as he possessed a good professional education and in some degree the graces 
of culture. He was a surveyor of land, and came A*om Concord, Mass., to the 
Kennebec in 1771, in the employ of the Plymouth company; his ilrst work 
was a survey and plan of a part of Pondtown (now Winthrop) and Hallowell ; 
in 1772 he surveyed and made a plan "eastward of Sheepscot river," and in 
1773 he made surveys and laid out lots in Canaan (Skowhegan) ; in 1774 he 
made plans of surveys in Vassalborough (which then embraced Sidney) ; also 
'' Twelve-mile pond*" (now Unity); and Jones* plantation (named for him), 
which afterwards was incorporated as the town of China. He became pos- 
sessed of lot number ten (Jonathan Bowman's) in ancient Hallowell, through 
which Trout brook (now called Bond brook) flows, and built a saw mill in 
1773 at the lower falls (near the recent manufactory of Webber & Gage) . In 
1798, after the passions engendered by the war of the Revolution had been 
allayed, Mr. Jones was employed by Charles Vaughan of Hallowell, who was 
then a promoter of the interests of the Plymouth company, to survey the land 
and lay out the lots, streets and wharves of a proposed city a few miles below 
the site of the present city of Bath, at a place on the Kennebec since known 
as Jones' Eddy. The projected city was never built~th| elaborate plan never 
attracted favorable popular attention — thtf city of Bath having grown up 
instead ; but the name of the surveyor is attached permanently to the eddy 
where the fleets of commerce were expected to anchor. Mr. Jones was a 
skilful surveyor and a man of good character, and of boundless, uncompro- 
mising loyalty to his convictions. He lived in Augusta in a house which he 
built near the foot of Northern Avenue, not far from the bank of the brook, 

^ There were four persons in the ancient (3) John Jones, son of James and Huidah 
township of HalloweU and early town of (Hancock) Jones ; m. Hannab Jones of 
Angnsta who bore the name of John Jones. Sidney ; he came to Augusta in 1805 and 
(1) John Jones, a Boston merchant and a lived here until 1806, when he moved to 
proprietor in the Plymouth company ; he Hallowell— but he appears to have returned 
owned the Winslow-pliin lot number seven- in 1819 and lived here until 1840 ; he bad a 
teen, east side, in the present town of Chel- , son (4) John, Jr., b. in Hallowell July 2, 
sea; be failed in business and one of his 1812. The appellation "Black" or "Ma- 
creditors — Sir WiiUam Baker of England hogany*' affixed as a nickname to the tory 
— made a levy on bis interest in the com- was less an epithet than a convenience to 
pany lands ; James Bridge, Reuel Williams distinguish him from his similarly named 
and Robert O.Shaw bought this interest contemporaries. (Plymouth company rec- 
on speculation and subsequently sold it at ords ; Hallowell records ; Me. Hist. Soc. 
great profit. (2) John Jones, the tory. Coll., 1896.) 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 73 

where he died Aagast 16, 1828. His wifle was Rnth Lee of Concord, Mass., a 
sister of Judge Lee of Wiscasset, and of John Lee, an absentee torj. Mrs. 
Jones was a lady of great force of character, a member of the South Parish 
Church, and was esteemed by her chosen Ariends ; she died October 7, 1835. 
The childless husband and wife lie buried side by side in the northeasterly 
part of Mt. Vernon cemetery, but the precise location of their untablcted 
graves Is now unknown. 

John Jones' name is preserved in the records of the numerous surveys which 
he made, and will survive so long as title deeds to lands on the Kennebec shall 
pass f^om seller to buyer ; but the man is more widely remembered through 
his lealty and escapades and retaliations as a tory during the war of the Rev- 
olution. The political ferment (that preceded the bloody outbreak) was active 
throughout the country, and the whigs and tories were rallying in bitterness 
to their respective party alignments, at the time when the Plymouth company 
with new hopeftilness was vigorously engaged in multiplying and enlarging its 
settlements. Early in the conflict John Jones stood boldly with ^ the tories, 
like Benjamin Hallowcll, Sylvester Gardiner, and most of the other proprie- 
tors — looking haughtily upon the revolting patriots as -^ 

<* A dreadful brotherhood, 

In whom all tarbolent vices were let loose;" 

he declared for the king and parliament, and in no weak or halting manner, 
and when he came to the Kennebec he did not leave any of his convictions 
and prejudices behind. That in other respects he was a good citizen is appa- 
rent in the fact that his name was placed flrst in the first list of jurymen ap- 
proved by the inhabitants of Hallo well in town meeting held 2Sd March, 1772 ; 
a year later, however^the year of the destruction of the tea in Boston harbor, 
he had fallen In the regard of his townsmen. At the annual town meeting 
held 15th March, 1778, John Jones was elected to the office of constable; this 
was then a position of considerable importance, as the taxes were collected 
by constables. Jones was so objectionable to some of the voters that they 
sacceeded in adjourning the meeting to another place the next day, when the 
vote electing Jones was reconsidered and he was thus summarily deposed. 
Two years later, March 20, 1776, Just before the battle of Lexington, Jones 
was again elected constable, to the great chagrin of the patriots. Jones had 
positive fHends and loyal followers, and he used them on this occasion with 
resolution and success, for the town record says : '' Reconsidered the constable 
vote, purged the meeting — and made choice of Mr. John Jones again." This 
was a bitter potion for the patriots and an hour of triumph for Jones ; the 
latter appears to have been content with the vindication, as he immediately 
resigned the duties of the office. (Town record, April 10, 1775.) 

for the nexttwo years, one of them (1776) being signalized by the Decla- 
ration of Independence, the local tories did not cause any incident in the town 
meetings; but April 14th, 1777, it was ** Voted that Lieutenant John Shaw be 
the man to inspect the tories and make information thereof." John Jones was 
still the blatant and potential leader of the obnoxious faction and the person 
against whom the vote was aimed. The action of the town irritated him, and 
provoked him to new insolences and mischievous activity. A special town 
meeting assembled July 17, 1777, when the voters took action as follows : 



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74 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

" Agreeable to an Act of the General Court of the State of Massachasetts 
Bay, entitled * An Act for the preservation of this and the other United Amer- 
ican States from the danger to which they' are exposed fh>m the internal 
enemies thereof,* the town made choice by ballot of Lieut. John Shaw to 
procure and lay before the court described In said Act evidence against John 
Jones of said Hallo well, whose name was exhibited to the town, and who 
they suppose to be of a disposition Inimical to the liberties and privileges of 
the said town." " 

John Shaw as above directed Immediately laid the case of Jones before the 
Court of Sessions of the Peace at Pownalborongh ; thereupon the accused, 
courageously relying upon the forbearance of a majority of his townsmen, 
petitioned the selectmen to call a town meeting to reconsider ths vote against 
him; fifteen others *'on his behalf" Joined in the petition, which shows that 
the torles were relatively numerous In the town. The selectmen accordingly 
issued their warrant for a meeting October 25th, "to see if the town will 
reconsider the vote of July 17th relating to John Jones being voted inimical 
to the liberties and privileges of the United States :" also "to see if the town 
will declare him again inimical, or vote to clear him of the charge, and direct 
Lieut. Shaw to enter a nolle prosequi in his case." But unhappily for Jones 
the patriotic spirit of the town was too intense to release its indictment 
against him ; *' Voted not to reconsider that vote passed the 17th of July, 
1777, relating to John Jones being Inimical to the privileges and liberties of 
the United States ; . . . . Voted, said Jones Inimical again to the liberties 
and privileges of said States." This settled the matter for Jones, who soon 
after fied, first going to James Wlnslow, a sympathising half-quaker Mend of 
his who resided on the east side of the river below the town, near the upper 
edge of the pre.sent town of Randolph, where he remained over night, and 
was taken down the river the next morning, and thus escaped for a time.^^ 
On the 4th of November he appeared before the Court at Pownalborongh, and 
was ordered to ** recognize in the sum of £100 to answer the accusation of the 
town of Hallowell against him for being Inlmlcally disposed toward this and 
the other United States of America." The following named persons were 
recognized as witnesses In the case In the sum of £5 each : Samuel BuUen, 
George Brown, John Robbins, L. Costigan, Oliver Wood, John Carlow, 
Ezekiel Chase. When the time arrived for convening the Court to try Jones, 
Justice James Howard, who had started on his Journey from Fort Western to 
Pownalborongh, ** encountered a terrible fall upon the Ice (December, 1777), 
which prevented his attendance," and no other Justice of the quorum being at 
hand to supply his place the Court adjourned without day ; and as the *' trans- 
portation act," under which the prosecution was Instituted, expired on the 
first of the next month (January 1, 1778), nothing farther was done with 
Jones under the town meeting proceeding. 

14 For the act under which the town pro- and see Town Records of Hallowell, Mar. 

ceeded see Province Laws, 1777, chap. xlvl. 10 and April 10, 1775 ; July 17 and Oct. 25, 

Appendix. Boston : ed. 1814. 1777. 

u North's History of Angasta, p. 140 ; 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 75 

John Jones was also the respondent in another case growlug out of his tory- 
ism. At the session of the court held at Powualborouii^h in the full of 1777, 
he was indicted for an attempt '^o hurt and destroy the credit of the public 
bills of the United States of America and the State, by speaking in the hearing 
of divers subjects of the State, of and concerning said bills, as follows : 
* Damn the trash ;' * I had rather have half the sum in silver ;' ' Curse the con- 
tinental bills;' *I wish they were in hell;* * there's no value in it.*" The 
record, after the arraignment and plea, then proceeds: '* Timothy Langdon, 
attorney for the government, being in court, says he will not farther prosecute 
the case, and it was nolle prossed. This result was on account of a defect in 
the indictment." 

Thus ended in court the cases against John Jones for disloyalty ; they were 
dropped without trials — perhaps in a spirit of forbearance toward the accused, 
who, without his obtrusive toryism, would have been a worthy and esteemed 
citizen — but probably because the prosecution apprehended that a determined 
defence by the bold and sprightly i*espondent, and the mixed condition of 
public sentiment, would defeat conviction before the jury. James Howard, 
the first settler and faithful factotum of the province government at ancient 
Hallowell, was a leading Justice of the court ; Jones was his fellow-townsman ; 
both were affiliated with the English Episcopal Church, and had worshipped 
together at services conducted by the surpliced frontier missionary, Jacob 
Bailey, within the walls of Fort Western. Under the circumstances it is not 
strange that Judge Howard, although a whig, should shrink from sitting In 
Judgment on his tory neighbor and brother churchman, whose toryism differed 
not much Arom that of some others of his town, only it was more brazenly 
demonstrative and noisy and exasperating. 

After running successfully the gauntlet of prosecution In the local court, 
slipping unpunished through the meshes of the law in the bailiwick where his 
few fMends and claqueurs could make themselves felt in his Interest, Jones 
presently and unexpectedly found himself in the hands of a power that took 
little heed of social or neighborly amenities. If the law was unable to repress 
him in Lincoln county because of surrounding influences and hesitating magis- 
trates, there was a tribunal, possessing fhll star-chamber attributes, that 
could." He was seized by order of the revolutionary government and lodged 
in Jail at Boston ; there he remained for some time In humiliating and irksome 
confinement. It being the policy of the government to permit all politically 
proscribed persons to remove beyond the limits of the United States, Jones 
was tacitly allowed that privilege, and under the guise of an escape, quite 
agreeable to the authorities, he fied to Canada, where, instead of retrieving 
his character and name, he took the field in the service of the British, and 
engaged in a mild form of guerilla warfare — on two occasions penetrating to 
the Kennebec, and once retaliating severely though bioodlessly upon one of 
his old political foes. Colonel Charles Cushlng of Pownalborough, as related 
by himself in a letter to his friend and fellow-tory, the Rev. Jacob Bailey. 

u Records of the SeBsions at Wiscasset. D. 1777, chapter cocxxxi, edition 18U. 
For the text of the act under which the in- ^' Laws of 1777, chap, xlv, edition 1814. 
dictment was found, see Province Laws, A. Appendix, p. 812. 



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76 HISTORr OF AUGUSTA. 

Rev. Jacob Bailey, writing from Pownalboroagh do ring October, 1774, in 
the coarse of a recital of the doings of the local patriots and the tribulations 
of their neighbors, the tories, says : *' Mr. Gardiner [Nathaniel Gardiner, a 
kinsman of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner] .... was obliged to fly that evening, 
and escape to Boston. About midnight one hundred and fifty men, armed 
with guns and various weapons, surrounded his house, demanded a sight of 
him, and insisted upon searching for tea. Mr. Hazard, a gentleman flrom Rhode 
Island, entered into a parley with their leaders, and they flrmly engaged that 
none, except five chosen men, should enter into the house ; but they quickly 
broke their engagements, rushed in, rifled the house, broke open his desk, and 
perused his papers, and after being treated with several gallons of rum, they 
stole Mr. Hazard*s buckles, and then inquired for Mr. Jones, the surveyor. 
They insisted upon his signing the covenant, upon which he stripped open his 
bosom, and told them they might stab him to the heart, but nothing should 
induce him to sign that accursed instrument. They seized him with violence 
and threw him headlong Into the river, and then dragged him about till he was 
almost torn to pieces, but all to no purpose. They at length desisted." 

In a letter dated February 8th, 1780, and directed to John Jones, at Quebec, 
Mr. Bailey wrote : *' Let us flatter ourselves with the pleasing prospect of 
meeting again in the regions of Kennebeck, and if we should not be happy 
enough to find all our friends remaining after so violent a tempest, yet we that 
have escaped the general wreck may rejoice In each other's society, and have 
the pleasure of regarding with contempt those sons of rapine and violence who 
drove us ttom our peaceful habitations, and forced us into the ocean, to con- 
tend with rocks, currents, whirlpools, storms and hurricanes.'' In writing to 
Mrs. Ruth (Lee) Jones, at Concord, Mass., about the same time, Mr. Bailey 
said: ''I have just received a packet from your consort, Mr. Jones. After 
passing through a variety of adventures, he arrived at Lake Champlain, and 
afterwards, by several removes, reached Quebec on the 29th of August. His 
last letters are dated November 2d." To a friend In Halifax, Mr. Bailey wrote, 
April 18, 1780: **I take this opportunity to recommend to your favor Captain 
Jones. He is appointed to the command of a company in Rogers* Battalion. 
I am persuaded that his active and enterprising genius will be of great service 
in the department to which he belongs." Mr. Bailey wrote to another acquaint- 
ance : ** I send you this by our friend Jones, who is engaged to chastise the 

rebels Yon must be persuaded that no man Is better fitted for the 

service, both in point of knowledge and resolution." In a letter written about 
the same time, Mr. Bailey said : ** We were happily surprised last week with 
the company of Captain Jones, one of our Kennebeck neighbors, who escaped 
A*om close imprisonment in Boston last spring. Alter passing through a 
variety of scenes, he was fortunate enough to reach Quebec, where meeting 
with the famous Colonel Rogers, he is now engaged in the army, and intends 
to visit his country by way of Penobscot. His capacity is equal to his under- 
taking." 

John Jones wrote to Rev. Mr. Bailey, ftrom Fort George, September 4th, 
1780: ** I have had two trips to Kennebeck, one by land, the other in a whale- 
boat. First, by land : I went up and down, till I found where to strike 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 77 

ThoQght best to bring " off. The way I proceeded was as follows : I 

surrounded his hoase in the morning, very early ; sent two men to rap at the 
door. On his crying out, * Who is there?* I answered, *A friend I* * A fiiend 
to whom ? ' I answered, * To the Congress, and we are f^om George's River 
with an express, for the enemy has landed fifteen hundred troops and three 
ships.' He jumped up and came down with his breeches on, lit a candle and 
opened the door. We immediately seized him. On his making some noise 
his wife came running down stairs, but soon returned, and put her head out 
of the chamber window, and halloed, murder! I told her that if she did not 
hold her tongue my Indians would scalp her. Away we hauled him into a boat 
we had prepared, and up the river about a mile above Gardinerston, landed 
him, and gave him a pair of shoes and stockings, and marched him to Fort 
George, across the woods, in four days. The whole country was alarmed, and 
was about six hours after us. In two or three days Kowland [Cushing] came 
in a flag. In two or three days after, three men came in and informed us how 
matters were. Joseph North has gone to Boston. Bowman keeps a guard 
every night, and all the people are very much fk'ightened. Rowland keeps 
a guard, and Major Goodwin sleeps every night at the house. Many of our 
fHends have been threatened, but no one is touched or hurt, for great is their 
fear. Many of the inhabitants don't cut their meadow. All our friends were 
well, when by water we went and cut out a vessel, and brought her here safe. 

We also took many others I have had several scoatlngs since I have 

been here. Have always got the better of the rebels. Nat. Gardiner is a 
prisoner with the rebels in Casco gaol. Cushing is going home to effect his 
exchange and Gardiner's." November 6th, 1780, Mr. Bailey wrote : ** I have 
had several visits f^om Capt. Jones, who is a captain in the army. He is now 
at Penobscot." In the autumn of 1784, Mr. Bailey wrote to Governor Went- 
wonh : *' I would beg leave to recommend to your notice Mr. Jones, an honest 
worthy loyalist, who has lost an ample estate for his attachment to His Majes- 
ty and the British government. He is endeavoring to obtain a grant of Grand 
Menan, and Is desirous of obtaining your interest and that of Gov. Fanning. 
I can assure you there is not a person of my acquaintance better calculated to 
improve a wilderness country than Mr. Jones. He was formerly principal 
surveyor to the Plymouth company, and has made several flue settlements at 
Kennebeck before the commencement of the late commotions." Mr. Jones 
wrote to Mr. Bailey trom St. Andrews, April, 1784, at which time Mrs. Jones 
was with him. Mr. Bailey says, in a manuscript history, ** When I arrived at 
St. Andrews, on the river Santa Croix [in his flight ft-om the country], I 
found a number of people Arom Penobscot and elsewhere, forming a settle- 
ment. But while Mr. Jones, the surveyor, was employed in laying out their 
lands, a party of Indians, under the direction of one Allen, a notorious rebel, 
took him prisoner. It is uncertain in what manner they intended to dispose 
of Mr. Jones. However the second day of his captivity, he had the good for- 
tune to escape, and to proceed in his business without Interruption."** 

u Col. Charles Cushing ; he is here called » Frontier Missionary, 
by a nickname. 



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78 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

The local animosity against Jones was intense, and not quickly allayed. 
After the war, protected by the provisions of the treaty of peace, he returned 
to his former home; his first appearance, November 15, 1785, was the occa- 
sion of a mob-like demonstration against him ;^ he was escorted from the 
house of Samuel Dutton, by a gang of men, and put under surveillance at 
Pollard's tavern, where he remained until morning, when he was half forcibly 
taken to Wlscasset. But he persisted in making Hallowell his home, as was 
his right, and by his many good qualities and an exemplary life he largely over- 
came, long before his death, the bitter prejudice which his attitude and acts 
during the revolution had aroused in his fellow-citizens. 

Phinehas JoneSy son of Nathaniel Jones, was born In Worcester, Mass., In 
1705; he removed to Falmouth (Portland), Me., In 1728 or 1729; he was a 
surveyor by profession, and he became a large speculator In wild land ; he 
died November 5, 1743, leaving an estate Inventoried at £8782 : 2 : 11 ; in a cod- 
icil to his win executed November 4, 1743, he referred to his Kennebec estate: 
<* Whereas I the said Phinehas Jones have and do own a part of a large Tract 
of Land lying on a river called Kennebeck In the county of York aforesd and 
In comon and undivided between me the sd Phinehas Jones and James Boad- 
wln and others, which part of sd Tract of Land I the sd Phinehas Jones pur- 
chased of Samuel Marshal of Boston and children, I do hereby impower my 
Executrix [Ann Jones, his wife] and Executors [Law Nicholas Hodge and 
Joshua Freeman, of Falmouth], named constituted and appointed In & by my 
sd last Will & Testament, and my will Is that they should Give or otherwise 
dispose of my part or parts of sd tract of Land that they shall think & judge 
will tend to the settlement of the same agreeable to what the other partners 
shall think best to promote & bring forward the sd settlement." .... 
Phinehas Jones m. Ann Hodge of Newbury by whom he had daughters : Lucy, 
m. (1) to Thomas Smith, son of Rev. Thomas Smith, pastor of the First Church 
in Portland; m. (2) in 1778, Richard Derby of Salem; m. (3) Judge Greenleaf 
of Newburyport; Hannah, m. Colonel John Walte; Ann, m. Richard Codman. 
Phinehas Jones* widow m. Jabez Fox of Falmouth, one of the Plymouth pro- 
prietors and the maternal grandfather of the children of John Potter (1787- 
1865) of Augusta. 

Nathaniel Thwing, baker, of Boston, son of John and Martha Drew Thwlng, 
was born August 17, 1703; m. (1) In 1727, Joanna Davis of Boston, who d. 
September 6, 1749 ; m. (2) Martha Clap of Woburn. He served as captain of 
the third company of the Eighth Massachusetts Regiment — Colonel John 
Choate — against Lou isbnrg ; also major In the same, and was afterwards pro- 
moted by Governor Shirley to be lieutenant-colonel of the regiment of which 
Richard Grid ley had been colonel, for protection against the French at Crown 
Point and upon Lake Champlaln. ** April 17, 1768, Col. Thwlng, of this town, 
was seized with an apoplectic fit, in the street, as he was returning home f^om 
public worship, and now lies at the point of death." **He died Monday, the 
18th ; he was a gentleman well respected ; formerly one of the selectmen ; In 
the late war [old French war] colonel of a provincial regiment, and In every 
action conducted with approbation."'* 

90 Mrs. BaLlard*8 Diary, Nov. 15, 1785. ^^ Extracts from Boston newspapers, April, 1768. 



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THE PLTMOUTH COMPANY. 79 

Florentius VasBal, an owner of one twenty-fourth part of the territory of 
the PlymoQth company, and the person for whom the town of Vassalborough 
was named in the act incorporating it (April 26, 1771), was born in Jamaica, 
West Indies ; he was a great-grandson of Samuel Vassal of London, who lived 
in the time of Charles I, and son of Wm. Vassal, who emigrated to Massa- 
chusetts as early as 1630. Florentius Vassal lyas in Boston in 1775, and in 
that year went to England where he died (in London) in 1778 ; his act of 
leaving America at the time when so many other subjects of King George 
were showing their loyalty by so doing, has caused him to be classed as an 
enemy to the independence of the colonies. In his will executed September 
20, 1777, he gave to his son Richard, and to Richard*s daughter Elizabeth, life 
estates in his share of the Kennebec lands, and then devised them in entail to 
her male children. The bequest proved of little value to anybody. The 
grand-daughter Elizabeth m. Sir Godft'ey Webster, Bart. ; some years after her 
marriage, while traveling in Europe, she fell into estrangement with her hus- 
band by reason of intimacy with Lord Holland, in consequence of which her 
husband brought an action for damages, and recovered £6000 fk'om Lord Hol- 
land, and obtained a divorce ft'om his disloyal wife. Lord Holland married 
Lady Webster in 1797, and took by sign-manual the surname of Vassal, which, 
however, was not assumed by his children. The estate on the Kennebec could 
have been sold ; but after the divorce. Lady Holland's son, Henry Webster, 
who (after the death of his elder brother) was the sole male heir, ceased all 
Intercourse with his mother; and chose to sacrifice his heritage rather than 
Join her in a conveyance.** After the lapse of years, the rights of Lady Hol- 
land and of her son were purchased separately by parties in Boston, who sued 
three of the settlers or ** squatters,'* in the name of Henry Webster, the son. 
The cases were carried to the Supreme Court at Washington, where it was 
decided that, during his mother's lifetime, the son could not maintain an 
action. After Lady Holland's decease suit against one settler whs renewed, 
but on intimation by the court that fifty years possession was sufficient to 
presume a grant or title, without considering another point, namely, whether 
the right of the plaintiff to recover was barred by the statute of limitations, 
the defendant paid a small sum for the land he occupied, and each party bore 
bis own costs. Thus, in 1851, terminated a litigation which, for a long time, 
-was the subject of much interest on the Kennebec as well as elsewhere, and 
the anxious holders of the Vassal lands were at last quieted in their posses- 
slon." 

John Walley was son of John Walley (1642-1711) of Boston, who, holding 
the rank of major, commanded a regiment under Governor Phipps, against the 

S3 Loyalists of the American Rovolntion, formity and fairness that of printing types, 

2 : 385. and illnstrates the high degree of accom- 

V In the archives of the Conrt of Probate plishment required of the ofilcial copyist in 
for Kennebec County is a copy of the will England when the will was made. This 
of Florentius Vassal, finely written in old copy is probaUy a fac-simile of the origi- 
£nglish text-hand on eleven sheets of nal, and it is authenticated nnder the seal 
parchment ; each sheet is 24 by 30 inches in of the Prerogative Conrt by the Arch- 
size; the chirography approaches in nni- bishop of Canterbury (1828). 



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80 HI8TOBT OF AUGUSTA. 

French and Indians in 1690; he was the chief military officer of the expedi- 
tion against Quebec, February 12, 1689 ; he rose to be lientenant-general of 
his Majesty's forces ; he was a member of the council under the new charter 
of 1692, and was appointed one of the judges of the Superior Court, Jane 7, 
1700, and served for nearly eleven years; he died January 11, 1711, possessing 
a large estate ; his son John inherited his mansion and grounds on Water 
street, Boston ; he died in 1755*. 

Jacob Wendelly son of John and Elizabeth Wendell, was bom in Albany, N. 
Y., August 5, 1691; he was placed, while in his minority, under the care of 
John Ml CO, an eminent merchant of Boston ; he afterwards became settled in 
Boston as a merchant, and was very prosperous ; he was highly respected in 
the town and province, and, in addition to many other offices, he was repeat- 
edly employed by the government in the negotiating of treaties and in exchange 
of prinoners with the Indians; he m. August 12, 1714, Sarah Oliver, a dau. of 
Dr. James Oliver, of Cambridge. The sons of Jacob and Sarah (Oliver) 
Wendell were Jacob, John, Mico and Oliver. Judge Oliver Wendell, the 
youngest son, m. Mary Jackson, and had Sarah, who m. Rev. Abiel Holmes 
(1768-1837), and they were the parents of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809- 
1894). Margaret, the twelfth child, m. William Phillips, whose son, John 
Phillips, was the first mayor of the city of Boston, and the father of Wendell 
Phillips (1811-1884), the eloquent anti-slavery orator. 

John WinsloWj husbandman, of Marshfleld, son of Isaac and Sarah (Hens- 
ley) Winslow, and great-grandson of Edward the pilgrim, was bom May 27, 
1702; m. February 16, 1726, Mary Little; after her decease hem. a widow 
Johnson (b. Barker) of Hingham. He became a major-general in the British 
line ; he had command of the expedition into the Kennebec country, to erect 
Forts Western and Halifax (1764) ; he was a colonel in the expedition to Nova 
Scotia in 1755, and was compelled to be a prominent participator in the expul- 
sion and exile of the Acadiaus; he has been blamed for being an instrument in 
the cruel removal of seven thousand people fk'om their native country, for the 
ruining of their homes and farms, and for their being scattered throughout the 
English colonies; but he acted under orders emanating f^om ''reasons of 
state," and he was eminently a generous and kind-hearted man ; he participa- 
ted in the campaign on Lake Erie in 1756, as commander-in-chief. In 1762 he 
was appointed one of the commissioners ''to repair to the river St. Croix; 
determine upon the place where the said easterly line [of Maine] is to begin ; 
extend the said line as far as should be thought necessary : and ascertain and 
settle the same by marked trees, or other boundary marks." William Brattle 
and James Otis were his associates, and they made a report of their doings 
which was printed. This was the first of the many efforts made to solve the 
long open question, "which is the true river St. George?" He died at Hing- 
ham, April 17, 1774. His portrait, with the portraits of his ancestors, Is In 
the library of the Massachusetts Society ; his sword is now transmitted in 
the family; "his bravery was proverbial and his reputation as an officer 
excellent." 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 81 

The Plyraouth company early saw that the embers of the old 
Indian hostility to the white man's advancement up the Kenne- 
bec were still alive and glowing ; large and noisy deputations of 
warriors gave ominous warnings that no new settlements should 
be made on the river. These threats were met by a conciliatory 
policy ; the authorities at Boston were prevailed upon to trans- 
fer Captain William Lithgowfrom Fort St. George (now Thom- 
aston) to the command of Fort Richmond. Captain Lithgow 
was a discreet and humane man ; he had long been in contact 
with the Indians as truck-master's assistant and gun-mender, 
and was well liked by them. It was hoped that he would be 
able to reconcile the Indians to the proposed new settlements. 

The company began its active operations in the Kennebec 
-wilderness in 1750, on the east side of the river (now Dresden), 
opposite Fort Richmond ; there the surveyors laid out the town- 
ship of Frankfort and lotted a section of it into the site of a 
proposed village ; the next year (1751) the company erected a 
defensible house which was named Fort Shirley, in compliment 
to the Governor. This was the first habitation built by the 
company on its territory ; it was located by the river and near 
the spot where the court house was built eleven years later 
(1762). Great efforts were made to induce settlers to trim 
away the rugged forest and occupy the land, but with only 
indifferent success. 

The natives were sullen and malignant. In retaliation for 
the proposed building of Fort Shirley they attacked some of the 
inhabitants in the vicinity of Fort Richmond, September 8, 
1750, slaying one settler, wounding another, and leading thir- 
teen ** other persons captives to Canada. In February, 1754, 
another band of warriors warned Fort Richmond garrison of an 
impending massacre. This dread symptom of war, together 
with numerous vicious depredations in other parts of the prov- 
ince, caused general alarm ; wild rumors became rife and among 
tbem was one partly believed by Captain Lithgow, that the 
French were building a fort between the waters of the Kennebec 

94 Papers of Rev. Jacob Bailey, quoted by newspaper, April 12, 1895. 
Charles E. Allen, in the Richmond Bee 



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82 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

and the Chaadiere ; this was repeated to Groveroor Shirley at 
Boston, who promptly, after the manner of a good soldier that 
he was, ordered a reconnoissance to be made to the place of the 
reputed fort. The public mind was in an excited state ; the 
General Assembly requested the Governor to proceed in person 
to the Kennebec with a military force sufficiently strong to break 
up any French settlement that might be discovered there, and 
also to fortify the valley. 

The Plymouth company on the 3d of April, while the public 
mind was centered upon the subject, passed the following vote : 

Voted, That in case the GeDeral Court of the Province of Massachosetts 
Bay shall, at their present session, come to a determination to hoi Id a fort at 
Taconnet, npon Kennebec Biver; that then this proprietee will (if desired by 
the government), at the time of their building of the fort above mentioned, 
build or cause to be built, at or near Cushenoch:, as the Governor shall order. 
a house of hewn timber not less than ten inches thick, one hundred feet long, 
thirty- two feet wide and sixteen feet high, for the reception of the said Prov- 
ince's stores, with conveniences for lodging the soldiers who may be placed 
there by the government ; and will picquet in the same at thirty feet distance 
flrom every part of said house, and build a block-house twenty-four feet square 
at two of the opposite angles, agreeable to a plan ready to be exhibited when 
it shall be called for, the government protecting the people while building said 
honse. 

As the result of a subsequent personal conference between 
Governor Shirley and the leading promoters of the Plymouth 
company the Governor officially addressed the following propo- 
sition to the company : 

Boston, April 16, 1754. 

Gentlemen — The Great and General Assembly of this Province having in 
its present session, by their message to me, desired that I would order a fort 
to be erected, of about one hundred and twenty feet square, as far up the Ken- 
nebec, above Richmond Fort, as I shall think fit ; and whereas the placing 
such a new fort upon this occasion, near Taconett Falls, would contribute 
more to the defense of the said river and protection of the settlements which 
already are, or shall hereafter be made upon it, than erecting a fort at or near 
Cushenac, but would be attended with this inconvenience, that the depth of 
water in said river will not admit provisions and stores to be transported in a 
sloop, higher than Cushenac ; so that it is necessary, in case a fort shall be 
erected at Taconett Falls, that a strong defeusible magazine should be built at 
Cushenac for the reception of the government stores and provisions, in their 
carriage to the said fort. I think it proper to acquaint you, that in case you 
shall, forthwith, at the expense of your proprietee, cause to be built, at or 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 83 

near Cnshenac, npon said river as I shall order, a house of hewn timber, not 
less than ten inches thick, one hundred feet long, and thirty-two feet wide and 
sixteen feet high, for the reception of the Province stores, with conveniences 
for lodging the soldiers who may be placed there by the government ; and will 
piquet in the same, at thirty feet distant ftom every part of the house, and 
build a blockhouse, of twenty-four feet square, at two of the opposite angles, 
agreeable to a plan exhibited by you to me for that purpose, and furnish the 
same with four cannon carrying ball of four pounds, I will cause the workmen 
who shall be employed in building the said house to be protected In their work 
until the same shall be finished, and will give orders, as soon as may be, for 
erecting a new fort at the charge of the government, of the dimensions pro- 
posed by the general assembly in their aforesaid message to me, above Taco- 
nett Falls, upon the above said river, for the protection of the settlements 
made, or which may hereafter be made, upon the same, and in the adjacent 
country, and use my best endeavors to cause the same to be finished with the 
utmost expedition. I am, gentlemen, your friend and servant, 

W. Shirley. 
To the Proprietors of the Kennebec Purchase from the late Colony of New 
Plymouth. 

Governor Shirley commanded that preparations be made for 
a military campaign on the Kennebec. Major-general John 
Winslow was put in immediate command of the operations ; he 
organized from the militia an army of about eight hundred 
men,^ which in June embarked at Boston for the field of ser- 
vice. Two hundred men were left at Fort Shirley (now Dres- 
den), while the others continued on the route to Cushnoc and 
Ticonic. A large number of mechanics skilled in the use of 
woodmen's tools accompanied the little army to build the two 
projected forts. Governor Shirley himself sailed from Boston 
on the 2l8t of June, for Falmouth, attended by a quorum of his 
council, and also by ex-Lieutenant-Governor Dummer and Paul 
Mascarene, commissioner for Nova Scotia, and other less distin- 
guished notables.^^ 

tf Rev. Thomas Smith (1702-1795) the » Parson Smith's joornal has these en- 
pastor of the First Chnrch in Portland tries of the then current news of the day at 
(1725-1795), entered in his journal, March Falmouth : "June 21, 1754. The Norridge- 
19, 1754 : " We are now raising six compa- wock Indians came here ; forty-two in all 
nies of soldiers (making collectively eight and twenty -fiye men. 24. Several of the 
hundred) to cover the eastern frontiers, the transports, that have the soldiers for Ken- 
Indians having lately appeared snrly and nebec, got in to-day. 25. Eight hundred 
threatening at Richmond, and the Gtovem- soldiers got in and encamped on Bangs* 
ment being ^prehensive they design to Island. 26. The Governor got in this 
break npon us. The new settlement of the morning. 27. The Government dined in 
Rymouth patent is the provocation." the Ck>nrt Chamber. 29. The Government 



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84 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

The work of preparing the timber for the fort at Cushnoe was 
imniedijitely begun at Fort Shirley. There, guarded from pos- 
sible Indian attack by a line of videttes in the forest some dis- 
tance from the river, the woodchoppers felled the tall and 
shapely pines, and hewed them with axe and adze ready to be 
laid like granite blocks into a ^olid wall ; then the timbers were 
sluiced into the river and towed in rafts, laboriously and slowly, 
as the flood-tides favored, to the eddy at Cushnoe ; here, one by 
one, they were dragged out of the water and borne on the 
shoulders of the stalwart workmen to the building site. As in 
the raising of King Solomon's temple the wrought and fitted 
parts were put together, making the strong and enduring whole. 
The windows were screened with thick planks split from the 
trunks of oak trees, and like the walls were proof against the 
bullets of the day. The main building, now standing where it 
was constructed, is one hundred feet long and thirty-two wide. 
The two block-houses similarly constructed were twenty feet 
square, with projecting stories twenty-four feet square, and were 
covered with hip roofs, from the centres of which arose sentry- 
boxes six feet square made of hard-wood plank and loop-holed 
for musket firing. The upper stories had slips for muskets and 
four port-holes, each, for cannon. One of these block-houses 
or flankers was placed at the southwest corner of the parade, so 
as to command the west and south sides ; the other at the north- 
east comer, to command the east and north sides. At the other 
corners of the parade were placed sentry-boxes twelve feet 
square, built of timber; and a palisade between the buildings 
enclosed a parade one hundred and sixty feet long by sixty-two 
wide. Outside of this palisade, and thirty feet from it, there 
was on three sides another palisade. On the fourth side, front- 
yesterday met the Norridgewock Indians, tribe went to Boston, and the rest retomed 
and to-day proposed to them the building home. Ang. 30. The Oovemor and the 
of the Fort at Teutonic. July 1. The gentlemen with him sailed in Sanders for 
Norridgewock Indians gave their answer, Kennebec, to visit Cushnoe and Teuconic 
and refuse the Fort's being built at Teu- Forts. Sept. 3. The Governor returned 
tonic. 2. The treaty was signed between from Kennebec. 8. The Governor sailed 
the Governor and the Norridgewock In- with Col. Masquerene, Mr. Brockwell, Mr. 
dians. 3. The Indians had their dance. Wheelwright, Kichmond, Gerrish, Miaot 
Three young men of the Norridgewock and Price." 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 85 

ing the river, it was open, leaving a space of thirty feet from 
the inner palisade to the brow of the river bank. The estjib- 
lishment was designed to be a fortified store-house. 

While the Plymouth company, its workmen guarded by 
province soldiery, was erecting a fort at Cushnoc, General 
Winslow was busily engaged in directing the building for the 
government of a larger fort at Ticonic, and in cutting a military 
road from Ticonic to Cushnoc ; also in exploring the upper 
Kennebec in search of the mythical French fort. 

The fragment of a journal rudely kept by the clerk of a com- 
pany which composed a part of General Winslow's reconnoiter- 
ing force has fortunately been preserved. It gives some inter- 
esting glimpses of the expedition. The route, so far as the 
troops proceeded — which appears to have been nearly one-half 
the distance to Quebec — was the same one that Arnold's army 
followed so painfully and to the verge of starvation twenty-one 
years afterward. This suggests that the disasters and sufferings 
which attended the later march may have been due more largely 
to the inefficiency of the commanding officers and the absence of 
soldierly and salutary discipline than to the natural difficulties 
of the route, the season of the year, or the distance travelled. 
John Barber, the writer of the journal, returned with his com- 
pany to Cambridge, unharmed by his experiences in the Kenne- 
bec expedition. The next year he was serving in another 
company, and wrote a letter to his wife and children from 
'*Schanactady, July ye 11th, 1755." It is supposed he was 
killed in a skirmish soon after this letter was written, but no 
certain knowledge of his fate was ever obtained. 

John Barber*s Journal. 

A Journal*^ of the Honble Capt Eleazer Melven : and his Company Marching 
and Saileing: We Marched flrom Concord May 30 1754 to the Widdow Bow- 
mans of Cambridge and Lodged. 

31 May Marched to Medford from thence sailed to Casstle William Where 
We Encamped antill June 22d. 

22 Jvne We Embarked On Board the Sloop Svccess Capt Josiah Simpson 
Master about twelve of the Clock Post Meridau When his Excellency Gover- 

» N. E. Hist, and Gen. Reg., Vol. 28, July, 1873, No. 3. 



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86 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



novr Shirley In the Ship Shirley Sailed ft-om [toiii] Casstle William Where 
[torn]. 



[Here follows a list of 
Capt Eleazer Melvln 
Daniel Brewer 
Nathel Cvmings 
Ephraim Hayward 
Seij Parling Amos 
Serj Melven Jacob 
SerJ L^mbson Jonathn 
Serg Dudley Joseph 
Clerk Barber John 
Corprl Melven Nathel 
Corp Woolcutt Nathanel 
Corp Hutchins Gorden 

Byam Thomas 

Batterfleld Nathaniel 

Butterfleld Joseph 

Bean Caleb 

Byam Beni 

Barrett Ben] 

Brabrook Wm 

Billings Joseph 

Chamberlin John 

Crossby Jacob 

Chandler Samel 



the officers and men of the 
Dudley James 
Davis Thomas 
Easta-Brook Robert 
Fari*er Jonathan 
Fletcher Jonathan 
Farrer Simon 
Gates Thomas 
Green Zacchus 
Hamileton Levi 
Hutchins Benjn 
Hamileton Seth 
Hutchins Andrew 
Hodge Wm 
Hutchins Thomas 
Kidder Solomon 
Laughtou Thomas 
Lessley James 
Maynard Joseph 
Moore Jacob 
Bobbins Charles 
Shed Wm 

Bathol- Stephenson 
Sawtelle Moses 



company.] 
Taylor Beuj 
Woodward Josiah 
Woodd Joseph 

Woodd Elijah 
Waite Joseph 
Wyman John 
Willson Wm. 
Cowen Thomas 
Klndale Bei\j 
Peacock John 
White Henry 
Crawflfiird Joseph 

Carpenter Deliverance 
Fattlson Joseph 

Waite Thomas 

Cooper James 

Crossby Sampson 

Dodge Caleb 

Burk Richard 

Brow James 

Goodale Phinehas 

Herriugton Noah 



23 Jvne Came on the Most Violent Storm that Ever Was known att that 
time of the year the wind South-East We steared for Plsgataqva harbovr and 
had come With-In two Miles of It But Night Comein on we tacked the Sloep 
abovt and Let her Run Before the Wind all night After Break of Day the 
Storm Increaseing and the men almost all of them Sea Sick It tore away our 
Gibb Salle which put our Men Into a Great Surprise : We Made Way for Land 
and abovte one or two of the Clock Sailed Into York harbovr. 

25 June Sailed f^om York for Cassco bay when Benjn Klndale fell f^om the 
Bowie Spleat and Went Vnder the Keele of the Sloop Came up att the Stearn 
and Sprang Vp Into the Whale Boate Laughing : Caleb Bean fell Into York 
river and Drove Down Stream twenty Rods and was taken up by James Sharp : 

26 June arrived at Cascobay about four of the clock in the Morning and 
Went on to Range's : Island Strvck vp our tents and there Stayed vntil July 
the 4th 

2nd Jvly a Covrt Martial Was Called vpon Morgan Dehortee and Richard 
Garrlvan for Curseing and Wising Damnation to them selves and others threat- 
ening Mens Lives, &c., Capt Melvin President or Chief Judge They were 
ordered to be Punished accordingly : the next Day they had Pay : Morgan De- 
hortee was Whiped thirty Lashes and Garrlvan Rid the Woodden horse : att 
which the Regiment Were Mustered all In arms to Behold the Sight 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 87 

4 Jvly Sailed firom Casscobay for Kennebeck river. 

6 arrived att Richmonds fort abovt two o' Clock where the Indians Were 
Assembled : We here that on the 7 day a Lad was taken Captive att Gorham 
by a White headed Indian : 

8 Jvly Sailed from Richmonds fort When the Raft of timber* for the first 
fort Came vp the river With aboae three hvndred tons in it. 

12 Jvly Landed att Cooshenavk [CashnocJ Where the English had Built 
a fort formarly: 

17 Col Prebble and Capt Melven Went up the River With forty two Men In 
four Whale Boats to teconnet Seventeen Miles to View a Place where to Bvild 
ye uper fort. 

18 Jvly the Oundelow Came up from Richmonds fort with a nvmber of 
Carriage Guns and some Stores 

19 Capt Josiah Church In the sloop Wheele of fortune--arrived here with 
one hundred and Eight new Recrutes 

25 Jvly Major General Winslow Sett out upon the March from fort Western 
with ten Companys was Salvted With the Discharge of five Great Guns : We 
had two Gondelows in the river ten Whale Boats and Eighteen Battoes With 
stores 

29 Jvly as the army Were haleing up the Gondelows over the first Palre of 
falls : ten Indians Came Down the river in four Canoes Which alarmed the 
whole army who att first took them for Enemies : But they proved friends for 
they Informed General Winslow of two men that had Deserted the Army viz : 
Thomas Tiler & John Wall John Wall and Thomas Tiler had Gott up as farr 
as teconnett and had Sold one of their Guns which Gun they had Brovght 
Down With them and the[y] Were Gone for Canada : the General then Gave 
the Indians Orders to follow them and Bringe them back Dead or alive and 
Promised them a Reward of fifty Pounds old tenovr and ten Gallons of Rum. 

25 Jvly Major General Winslow With Part of his army Landed at teconnett 
Point Where the Plymouth Company had Built a fort above one hundred years 
Since (42) Paces Longe In about two hours after we landed two of the Indians 
Brovght Down the two Deserters to us and the General Sent them to fort 
Western there to be Keept Waiteing for the Govemovrs Orders. 

27 Jvly the General with the Captains held a Covnsel to Consult where to 
Build the fort and agreed to Set it where the old fort Stood : In the afternoon 
the Guns and other Stores were haled vp. 

28 the Flagg Was hoisted : and att twelve of the Clock all the Guns were 
flred. 

30 Jvly att night the Store hovse was Broke open by one of the Centery 
Being In Llqver a number of Limmonds were found With him the next Day a 
Covrt Marshell was Called he Beged for-glvness and was acqvited : this Day 
Col Prebble and Col Frye arrived heare With a number of men & some stores. 

2 Avgvst Capt Melven With three hundred and above Marched to fort 
Western for Bread the night following the Remainelng Part of the army Were 
alaramed by the firelng of three Guns over Sebasstoocooke river. . 

5 the Maine Gvard was Put under Gvard by the Generals orders. 

38 Timber prepared at Frankfort for Fort Western at Cushnoc. 



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88 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

6 Last night the two Deserters Cutt a hole thro the floor and are Gone off 
Leaveing their Cloathing behind thero. 

A List of the Captains that were In the Late Expedition, With the Nvmber 
of Men Each Captn had 



Capt Melven 


69 


Capt Cobb 


66 


Capt Bayley 


60 


Hobbs 


72 


Willson 


46 


Fox 


54 


Johnson 


74 


Pierce 


69 


Lane 


46 


Flint 


66 


Adams 


42 


Wright 


46 


Ossgood 


62 


Perrey 


46 







Capt Gershom Flagg over the Carpenters Fair Service over the Digers. 

8 Avgvst Major General Wluslow Prebble" Doctr White worth 8 [torn] 
upon the Longe March for Norrldgewalk with five hundred and six men, and 
were Salvted [by] the Discharge of five Great Guns We took vp fifteen Bat- 
toes In the river with Stores : and In Goeiug vp the falls two of the Battoes 
were tvrned over Lost on [one] Gun and two Packs Whereby two men were 
Left Destitvte of Cloathing : Dr March being turned Over Bord he went twenty 
Bods under Warter : here the Rocks Lays up Edgeways for Miles together : 

9 Avgvst Marched five Miles When Levt Bent Came vp to the General with 
an Express ftrom the Governour. 

10 Avgvst General Winslow Returned Back Sick this Day we went ten 
Miles and at Sun Down we Crossed arressewonsuck [Wesserunset] river and 
Lodged upon an Island. 

11 Avgvst Marched One Mile and quarter the Raine Comeing on Strvck vp 
ovr tents and Lodged there 

12 Avgvst Marched One Mile and thirty Rod to the falls** Where We vn- 
loaded the Battoes and Carried the Loadeing over the falls by hand and went 
seven Miles fvrther & Encamped Thursday one Indian Belonging to Levt John 
Butlers Company is Missing and has not been heard of Since : 

13 Marched Six Miles and were Ordered by Col Prebble to March thro the 
Famous Indian town of Norrldgewalk In two files there [torn] Indians [torn] 
and [torn] they have [torn] we went one mile ovt of [torn] 

14 avgvst Marched three Miles and half then Encamped. 

16 Marched ten Miles and See three Indians Sitting by the Path they wer 
Covnting the Nvmber of ovr men; We see Seven More over the river that we 
never Spoak with. 

16 avgvst two mils and Came to a fire where two Indians Lay the night 
before. We went Eight miles and half this Day and In the afternoon we 
Crossed the river and Went by a Great Pair of falls 

17 avgvst Marched above Seven Miles In the forenoon and See seven Ca- 
noes and Eleven Indians and amonge the Rest one of the arro [torn] 

The contemporaneous Boston press published a semi-official 
account of the reconnoissance. 

» Jedediah Preble (1707-1784), then of so gkowhegan falls. 

Falmouth, Lieutenant-Colonel in this expe- 
dition. 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY, 89 

On Saturday last,'* John Shirley, Esq., son of His Excellency, our Govern- 
or, arrived at Boston from Falmouth in Casco Bay, by whom we have the fol- 
lowing account, viz. : That the forces under General Winslow set out from 
Teconnett with something more than live hundred men and fifteen battoes, on 
the eighth of August past, but after proceeding two days up the river, the 
General was taken so ill that he was obliged to return, leaving the command, 
with the instructions to him, with Col. Preble, who on the 10th, at nine in the 
morning, proceeded with thirteen battoes, one-half the men on one side, and 
the other half on the other side of the river, and on Tuesday, the thirteenth, 
arrived at Norridgewalk," which is thirty-one miles above Teconnett, beauti- 
fully situated, near four hundred acres of clear land, on which the grass is 
generally five or six feet high. Here they found six Indian men, three squaws 
and several children, who appeared at first surprised to see such a number of 
men and battoes so far advanced into their country ; but after they were told 
by Col. Preble that they had nothing to fear from him, that none of his men 
should hurt the least thing they had, nor go into their houses, and that Gov. 
Shirley had ordered that they should be treated with civility and kindness, they 
appeared well satisfied and were kind and friendly ; and Passequeant, one of 
their chiefs, presented him with two fine salmon, and some squashes of their 
own produce, and were all very free in drinking King George's and Governor 
Sliirley's health, and told him he was welcome there. They camped that night 
half a mile above the town, and the next day, leaving the battoes there with a 
detachment sufiSclent to guard them, they proceeded on their march to the 
great carrying place between the Kennebec and the river Chaudlere, where the 
French were said to be building a fort ; and arrived there on the eighteenth, 
which is thirty-eight miles and three-quarters above Norridgewalk, a few miles 
below which they met three birch canoes with eight Indians in them, who had 
lately come over the carrying place, and as they supposed from Canada. The 
Indians were much surprised on discovering the party, and endeavored to re- 
turn up the river with their canoes, but the rapidity of the stream prevented 
their speedy filght, on which they run the canoes on sliore, on the opposite 
side of the river, catched one of them up and run off" into the woods, leaving 
the other two on the spot, and made their escape to the carrying place, and so 
returned to Canada, to carry intelligence, as Col. Preble supposed, for he 
tracked them in his march across the said carrying place ; the course of which 
from the head of the Kennebec River is due west, and the distance three miles» 
three quarters and twenty-two rods, to a pond about two miles long and one 
and a half miles wide ; beyond that is another carrying place of about one 
mile, which leads to another pond '' that runs into the Chaudlere. 

They returned from the first mentioned pond the same day, and came to 
Norridgewalk the twenty-first of August, early in the day, where they found 
Capt. Wright and the detachment under his command all well, and thirty-five 
Indians, old and young, who, upon the knowledge of Col. Preble's return, 

« Boston Gazette, September 8, 1754. below the village of Madison on the same 

w Ancient Nanrantsouack, now called side of the river. 
Indian Old Point, situated about two miles ^ Lake Megantic. 



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90 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

dressed themselves up in their way very fine, by patting on clean shirts and 
painting and decorating themselves with wampum. They saluted him with a 
number of guns and three cheers, and then a number of them waited on him 
at the camp, welcomed him back, and seemed to express a good deal of satis- 
faction at his return. 

After drinking King George*s and Governor Shirley's health, they invited 
him to tlieir houses, and ten or twelve of their chiefs desired a short conference 
with him ; and after having cleared the house of young men, who diverted 
themselves, meanwhile, playing ball, &c., told him that he had passed and re- 
passed through their country, they were glad to see him come back, and he 
was heartily welcome ; and they had told him before he went, there was no 
French settlement at the carrying place, and since he had been there and found 
it so, hoped he would now look upon them as true men; and that we were now 
all one brothers ; and if their young men should get in liquor and affront any 
of the English, hoped we should take no notice of it, that they were deter- 
mined to live in friendship with us ; and if the Canada Indians had any design 
to do any mischief on our fk'ontiers, they would certainly let us know it; and 
if any disputes arose betwixt the French and us they were determined for 
the future to sit still and smoke their pipes. 

The Colonel told them the resolution they had taken would be very pleasing 
to Governor Shirley, and as long as they kept their faith with us they might 
depend on being treated as ft'iends and brethren, and be supplied with all the 
necessaries at Teconnett, which would be much more convenient than at Rich- 
mond ; all of which they told they liked very well ; and were sorry they had 
no liquor to treat them with, but desired he would see their young men dance 
and they ours, which they said was a token of fk*iendship and was accordingly 
performed. 

Next morning, on the Colonel's taking his leave of them, they wished him 
safe at Teconnett, and saluted him with thirty or forty small arms, as fast as 
they could load and discharge. 

The army arrived at Teconnett on Friday, the 23d day of August, at five 
o'clock in the afternoon, having been sixteen days on the march. As to the 
course of the river into the country, it must be referred until a plan of the 
same, which has been taken by a skilfUl surveyor, shall appear. The soil, for 
the most part, is extremely good and appears to be fertile. There are many 
beautiful islands in the river, some of which contain near a thousand acres of 
intervale ; but the land is not plentifully supplied with timber. 

The navigation to Norridgewalk is considerably difficult by reason of the 
rapidity of the stream and rippling falls, but 'tis likely will be much easier 
when the water is higher. There is but one fall •* above Teconnett that is 
necessary to carry the battoes around before we come to Norridgewalk, be- 
twixt which and the carrying place the navigation is vastly better than below, 
there being only two falls** to carry round, one of which, notwithstanding it 
is a mile in length, there is a plain beaten path; the other is not above thirty 
or forty rods.^ 

B4 Referring to the falls at Skowhegan. M Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. 8, pp. 230- 

85 Meaning the falls at Madison, and Car- 234. 
ratnnk falls at Solon. 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 91 

The fort-building operations l>eing in a state of forwardness, 
Governor Shirley with his numerous suite left Falmouth in the 
Province sloop MaasadiusettSy Captain Saunders, on Friday, the 
30th of August, in the afternoon, to visit officially the work of 
the army on the Kennebec. No record of the itinera ly of the 
trip or of the incidents connected with it has descended to us. 
Probably the distinguished party first landed sometime during 
the following day at Fort Shirley in Frankfort, whei'e there 
were conveniences for the lodging and entertainment of so large 
a company of gentlemen, and where the rites of religious wor- 
ship could be performed in a becoming manner by the court 
chaplain^ on the morrow, which was Sunday. There was then 
no hostel or settler's habitation on the river above Fort Shirley. 
It was not meet for His Excellency to sail or exercise any pub- 
lic function on the Sabbath ; so it is presumable that he and the 
lesser dignitaries attending him passed the sacred day as en- 
joined by the second commandment, enjoying in the meantime 
the hospitjility of the Plymouth company and the abundant 
substantialities and delicacies of its larder and sideboard, spe- 
cially provided beforehand in anticipation of the occasion. 

The worthy chief magistrate early on Monday morning, with 
a portion if not all of his party, and a deputation of Plymouth 
proprietors ^ as escort, proceeded to Cushnoc to formally in- 
spect the partly finished establishment which had previously 
been named Fort Western.^ The place had recently become 
the theatre of great activity, and of sights and sounds quite 
unusual in the region. In a woodsman's clearing near the river 
stood the palisaded house, its compact timber walls smooth 
and white from the hewers' axes, contrasting with the sheen of 
the water on one side and the hue of the forest on the other. 

•7 Charles Brockwell, Rector of King's » Governor Shirley was invited by some 

Chapel, Boston. of the members of the Plymouth company 

^ The committee appointed by the com- to suggest a name for the proposed fort at 

pany to saperintend the bnilding of Fort Cnshnoc, and he selected for it that of a 

Western consisted of Thomas Hancock, gentleman of his acquaintance in Sussex, 

Sylvester Gardiner, James and William England. See Hutchinson's History, p 

Bowdoin and Benjamin HaLlowell. Some 26. 
if not all of these gentiemen were present 
on this occasion. 



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92 HISTOEr OF AUGtJSTA. 

What ceremony of reception His Excellency received from 
Captain Howard and his company of workmen is not known. 
Probably the latter respectfully suspended work, while the 
guard of soldiers fired the regulation salute on the memoi^able 
occasion. No governor had before visited this portion of the 
valley of the Kennebec since the time of the Plymouth colony's 
occupation. 

Not tarrying long at Fort Western for either business or en- 
tertainment, the Governor resumed his journey to Ticonic. 
Embarking in a trim and buoyant boat he was rowed there in a 
few hours by a crew of stalwart oarsmen. He was welcomed 
with ceremony by General Winslow, whose guard of soldiers 
paraded and fired the usual gubernatorial salute of cannon and 
small arms. The main portion of the troops was absent under 
Lieutenant-Colonel Preble on the exploring tour up river. The 
axemen and carpenters engaged in building the fortress had 
made considerable progress in their work, but much which had 
been projected was yet uncompleted. His Excellency exam- 
ined approvingly the location of the fortification, and climbed 
the neighboring hill*® whose isolated summit had been marked 
for a salient of the foit below. He committed unreservedly to 
General Winslow in the confidence >vhich one good soldier 
always has in another, the government's authority in the future 
completion of the fortress. He conferred upon the post the 
name of Fort Halifax in honor of the Earl of Halifax, the then 
Secretary of State — the person for whom the city of Halifax 
was afterward named. Another of His Excellency's acts which 
renders his visit locally memorable, was his appointment of 
Captain William Lithgow to be the commandant of the fort.*^ 

Governor Shirley could not have remained at Fort Halifax 
more than a few hours ; his official duties were pressing him to 

^ Now the site of the VTinslow village volnme of the Collections of the Maine 

cemetery. Historical Society (1876) ; and in a long 

41 The materials for a fall and adequate and exhaustive article by William Ooold 

history of Fort Halifax may be found in (1809-1890), printed in the 8th volume of 

North's History of Augusta; in a contri- the same society's publications (1881). 
bution by Joseph Williamson to the 7th 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 93 

return to Boston.^ He appears to have re-embarked at Fort 
Halifax some time on Monday, the 2d of September, and mak- 
ing a remarkably rapid descent of the river, reached Falmouth 
at ten o'clock in the evening, by a swiftly sailing sloop, having 
left some of his party to follow in a slower vessel behind. Be- 
fore the end of the month of August the military forces under 
General Winslow had returned to Falmouth for their discharge 
from further active service. 

By early fall Fort Western was finished and equipped with 
four small cannon*^ mounted in the blockhouses, and a garri- 
son of twenty men. Its first and only commandant was Cap- 
tain James Howard, appointed by Governor Shirley who had 
first met him at Fort St. George together with Captain Lith- 
gow, on the occasion of a conference with the Indians and a re- 
newal of the Dummer treaty in 1752. 

The local Indian war which had been provoked by the oper- 
ations of the Plymouth company, became in 1756, a part of 
the great war between France and England for supremacy in 
North America ; the perils of the settlers on the Kennebec were 
thereby increased, and like its two neighboring compan- 
ions — forts Halifax and Shirley — Fort Western was dili- 
gently garrisoned during the years of the bloody and eventful 
struggle which ended only with the fall of Quebec. Soon after 
the treaty of peace in 1763, the garrison was finally withdrawn 
(in 1765 or 1766), the useless cannon abandoned to rust, the 
palisades removed and the block-houses allowed to finish their 
career of decay ; the last southwestern one disappeared in the 
year 1836. 

After about eleven years of usefulness in the service for 
which it was designed, Fort Western was converted into 
tenements, for private occupation ; but the building long re- 

^ Owing to the laok of available author- from Falmonth to Ticonic and retnm, ac- 

ities at th^ time of his writing, Mr. North, cording to his own statements in offldal 

in his History of Angnsta (page 46), fell letters occupied less than four days, 

into the error of stating that Governor « One of the cannon balls of the Fort 

Shirley ascended the Kennebec to the great Western equipment is preserved in the 

carrying place in search of supposed French collection of the Kennebec Historical So- 

settlements. In fact, the Governor's trip clety. 



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94 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

tained in the popular mind its public character, and has never 
lost its military name. It was bought of the Plymouth Company 
by Captain Howard in 1769, for $500, and it was his place of 
residence and business from 1754 until he built his Great House 
near Howard's brook in 1770. As it was the first building at 
Cushnoc, and the nucleus around which, after the fall of 
Quebec, the settlement formed and year by year increased, it 
was the common rendezvous of the i>eople onallpul)Iic occasions 
for many years. The first meeting of the freeholders to organize 
the town of HallowcU was held at Fort Western, and between 
that year (1771) and 1782 thirty-four town meetings were held 
under its roof. When General Arnold's army tarried a few days 
at the settlement in 1775, the doors of Fort Western were 
hospitably thrown open to as many soldiers as could lodge within 
its walls. The first public protestant religious service in the 
town of which there is record was held with the family of Captain 
Howard in Fort Western, conducted by Jacob Bailey, the 
missionary."" The first lawyer who established himself north 
of Pownalborough — the distinguished General Wm. Lithgow, 
grand-uncle of the founder of the Lithgow Library — opened an 
oflSce in the southwest room of this building in 1788. After 
the building of the meeting-house in 1783, Fort Western was 
no longer used for public puiposes. The last town meeting 
held in it was on September 2, 1782. Since then it has figured 
publicly only in the record of taxes on apiece of antique private 
property. 

It is not possible to mention in the space available for this 
chapter more than a few of the events and associations which 
make the impressive history of the venerable house — Fort 
Western. The full story covers the period from the landing 
of the Mayflower to the present day. The site was selected 
by Governor Winslow and his fellow-pilgrims for their primitive 
trading-house — the profits from which enabled the indigent, 

♦* Rev. Jacob Bailey wrote a letter from at Cobbosee : "I however preached at Cap- 
Pownalbdrough, under date of April 8, tain Howard's [Fort Western] , and had a 
1763, to Dr. Sylvester Gardiner of Boston, considerable congregation of the upper set- 
saying that he had received a cool reception tiers." . . (Frontier Missionary, p. 338.) 



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THE PLYMOUTH COMPANY. 95 

credit-bound colony to pay off \ts crushing debt, — and live. 
Between the Plymouth colony cultivating the friendship of the 
natives, and the Plymouth Company haughtily scorning it, 
there is close and romantic connection. The Kennebec forts 
were raised in extension of the civilization which the Pilgrims 
began : and from the sentry-floora of their block-houses the 
last fierce Indian was seen fleeing forever from the valley. Fort 
Western,^^ the central one, and the last lingering surviver of 
the group, has escaped the wrecking flames and floods and 
tempests of one hundred and fifty years; and within and 
without, before and around, its quaint and dingy walls has been 
enacted the whole history of the town and city of Augusta, which 
these humble pages only imperfectly record. 

tf A bronze tablet was placed on the tain James Howard, Commandant. Tab- 
northerly end of the bnilding in 1898, bear- let placed hj the Koussinoc Chapter, 
Ing the inscription <<Fort Western .greeted Daughters of the American Revolation.'* 
by the Ry mouth Company, 1754. Cap- 



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CHAPTER IV. 

THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 

It would be a fascinating although a frivolous employment to 
speculate for an idle hour upon what the history of Augusta 
and the related towns on the Kennebec would have been if the 
Plymouth company had not come into existence and given 
direction to the settlement of the land of the ancient trading- 
patent. As vainly may we muse how different would have been 
the history of the world if Columbus' antique compass had 
capriciously varied a little to the northward or southward in mid- 
ocean, and led the lonely fleet to the land-fall of a continent in- 
stead of to a tiny outlying island ; or try to dream what soil; of a 
State would have substituted for New England if the Mayflower 
had not blundered on to Plymouth Rock. The inscrutable pur- 
poses of the Creator are ever fulfilled whether in the dictation 
of human afliiirs or in the evolution of worlds and universes. 
It was an orderly ultimate of the sublime ways of Providence 
in the fullness of time for a few colonial gentlemen to resume 
possession of a shadowy heritage in the distant wilderness of 
the Kennebec and amid many difficulties subdue it to civiliza- 
tion and to their own financial profit. The lives of men are 
intimately co-related from generation to generation, and tran- 
sactions trivial in one century may germinate and reappear in 
another perhaps under higher forms and on broader planes of 
utility and progress. It has come to pass in the process of 
New England development that the sequestered Indian trade- 
reserve of the Pilgrims is now the locus of a large family of 
towns and cities whose notable pedigree goes direct by mesne 
conveyances through the Plymouth colony and its founders to 
the royal signature of James I, the son of the martyred Queen 
of Scots. 



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THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 97 

Contrary to popular expectation and the fond hopes of the 
Plymouth proprietors, the building of Fort Halifax and Fort 
Western had little influence in attracting settlers to the Ken- 
nebec. The discontent of the Indians and their occasional in- 
cursions through the valley from the foreign but not distant 
country of Canada, had the effect of paralyzing the efforts of 
the proprietors to sell their lands to desirable settlers, and in 
cases not a few even to give them away. The expenditure of 
labor and money for the forts and for men and materials to 
guard them proved a misdirected and costly outlay which never 
brought any substantial return. It was not until after the 
French power had been annihilated on the St. Lawrence that 
possession and title-deeds of real estate took ready value on the 
Kennel3ec. 

The Plymouth company employed John North, its sui-veyor, 
in 1750 and 1751, to perambulate and bound its territory on 
the east side of the Kennebec from the sea to Cushnoc and from 
thence easterly and southerly back again to the sea. From 
Cushnoc he followed an east course, and ran, meat^ured and 
spotted a line for fifteen miles, marking a tree at the end of 
every mile. At the end of the fifteenth mile he turned the line 
southward and continued it to the seacoast parallel with the 
Kennebec river, until at the end of the thirt3'-fouii:h mile it 
came to " Pumpking Cove" on the easterly side of Pemaquid 
point. He made a plan of this survey on a scale of one hun- 
di*ed and sixty rods to an inch, indicating the rivei^s and some 
of the smaller streams, and the bays, harbors and islands of the 
coast. The plan bears date, December 16, 1751. At Cushnoc, 
on the east side of the river at a point opposite the island which 
disappeared through the building of the Kennebec dam, is noted, 
"Cushanna, Old Settlement and Clear Land." Upon the plan 
is written the deposition of Samuel Goodwin, aged eighty- 
three years, taken in perpetuam August 14, 1800, in which he 
says he attended upon the survey of the " Patent from the sea 
as high up as Cushanac Island," and that the lines '^were 
actually run, measured and marked," as delineated on the 



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98 • HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

plan, in the years 1750 and 1751. This extensive preliminary 
survey was followed by no more important results than the im- 
mediate lotting of a portion of what is now known as Dresden 
Neck into farms for an expected colony of French protestants 
from Germany, and the organizing of the temporary planta- 
tion of Fmnkfort. Two years later the company employed the 
same surveyor to lay out a series of lots a mile in width and 
five miles long, — beginning at Abbagadasset point and extend- 
ing to the present southerly line of Augusta. The three most 
northerly lots of this survey and one-half of the next one ad- 
joining comprised a portion of the ancient township of Hal- 
lowell, and fell to the ownership respectively of William Bow- 
man, James Pitts, Benjamin Hallowell, and Sylvester Gkirdiner. 
The plan bears date of February 3, 1753. 

The military conquest of Canada — precipitated by the bril- 
liant capture of Quebec, — removed the fatal impediment to the 
advance of industrial progress into the wilds of Maine, and 
favorably affected as if by a stroke of magic the interests of 
the Plymouth company. On the 13th of February, 1760 — 
only five months to a day after the battle on the Plains of Abra- 
ham, — the company procured the incorporation of Frankfort 
into a township by the name of Pownal borough.^ The next 
fostering act of the legislature was the formation of Lincoln 
county on the 19th of the following June, and the making of 
Pownalborough the shire town, the Plymouth company en- 
gaging to build a court house, "within the parade of Fort 
Shirley," foity-five feet long, forty feet wide, and three stories 
high ; and that one room in the second stor}'' forty by forty- 
five feet should be fitted with boxes, benches, and whatsoever 
was needful for a court room ; and the easternmost block-house 
for a jail, and the easterly part of the barracks for a house for 
the jail-keeper.2 Between the 1st and the 8th of April, 1760, 

1 Pownalborough was named for Gover- a Plymouth Company's Records, Vol. 2, 
nor Pownal who had succeeded Governor p. 269. The court house building is stiU 
Shirley in 1756. It originally embraced standing, 
the towns of Alna, Dresden, Wiscasset, 
and the plantation of Perkins (then called 
Swan Island). 



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THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 99 

the company made thirty-two grants of land, mostly in Pownal- 
borough, and on the 14th of April, forty-two more in the same 
town and on Parker's Island (now Georgetown); and seven- 
teen other grants were made in that region during the remain- 
der of the year. During the same year four of the proprietors 
themselves were individually charged on the com]>any's books, 
each with a mile-wide lot on the river between what is now 
known as Bowman's Point and the Hallowell-Augusta line. 

The proprietors, stimulated by substantial success at Pownal- 
borough, moved vigorously in their efforts toward making other 
portions of the territory on the river available for the recep- 
tion of settlers. They employed Nathan Winslow to survey 
and mark into lots the land from the south line of the present 
town of Chelsea, east of the river, to the north line of what 
later tecame the town of Vassalboro ; and on the west side of 
the river from the present south line of Augusta to what is now 
the north line of Sidney. The peculiai'ity of this survey was 
three tiers of lots on each side of the river, each lot one mile 
long. In the first tiers abutting the river the lots were fifty 
rods wide (one hundred acres), in the second tiers one hundred 
and fifty rods wide, and in the third tiers seventy-five rods wide 
(one hundred and fifty acres). Two of every three front or 
river lots with the corresponding two lots in the third tier were 
to be granted to "good settlers"^ on the condition of their per- 
forming settling duties."* The proprietors reserved to them- 
selves every third river lot and all of the lots in the second 
range. The proposition distributed five hundred acres out of 
every nine hundred to settlers. 

8 Plymoath Company's Records, Book H. Williams by inheritance, and by him it 

2d. was presented to Lendall Titcomb, its pres- 

* The Winslow Plan was traced on doth ent possessor. It bears the following in- 

and is in a good state of preservation (in scriptlon : *< A tme plan of Kennebec river 

1904). It first went into the possession of from Cobbisconte up to the great falls, so- 

Dr. Sylvester Gardiner; later it was in the called, about six miles below Fort Halifax, 

keeping of James Bridge (1765-1834) when with the lots fronted 50 rods wide upon each 

he became the agent of the proprietors at side of the river for settlers and the propri- 

Angnsta; then it went into the hands of tors of the New Plymouth colony ; with the 

Reoel Williams, the successor to the busi- proprietors' part shaded in India ink, and 

ness of Mr. Bridge ; it descended to Joseph a draft of the settlers' back lots with roads, 



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100 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

While the survey was in progress, and Xathan Winslow and 
his chainmen and tree-spotters were busily at work measuring 
the forest on the Kennebec into farm lots, the Plymouth Com- 
pany was disseminating the following : 

Advertisement. The Proprietors of the iTew nefcec Purchase ftom the late 
colony of New Plymouth^ hereby inform the Publick, That besides the twelve 
Townships mentioned in their Advertisement of the 16th of February last, 
they have agreed to appropriate a Tract of Land on each side of Kennebec 
River for the Accommodation of such Families as may be inclined to settle 
there. The Land refer'd to is situated a little above Cobbiaeconte River, is good 
for Vessels of 100 Tons Burthen, and continues so several Miles higher as far 
as Fort'We^ei'n, 

They propose to grant to each settling Family 250 Acres, viz., 100 acres 
ftront ft*om Kennebec River, 50 rods, and run one Mile back ; and 150 Acres at 
two Miles fk*om said river : On Condition that said Family build an House not 
less than eighteen Feet square, and seven Feet stud ; clear and make fit for 
Tillage five Acres within three years; and dwell upon the Premises personally 
or by their Substitutes for the term of seven years more. As this Land is 
exceeding good, and is attended with many natural Advantages, the Families 
that apply for settlement there must be well recommended for their Sobriety, 
Honesty and Industry ; and such of that Character, who apply first, will have 
the first Choice of the Lots to be granted. 

For ftirther Particulars, enquire of James Botodoin, James Pftte, Silvester 
Gardiner, and Benjamin Hallowell, Esqrs., of Boston, and Mr. WUliam Bowdoin 
at Needham, Committee to the Kennebec Proprietors. 

Persons at the Eastward inclining to settle on the Lands aforesaid, may 
apply to Major Samuel Goodwin at Pownalborough, and James Howard, Esq., 
at FoH Western^ who will communicate their minds to the Committee afore- 
said.* 

DAVID JEFFBIES, Proprietors^ Clerk. 
Boston, 20th February, 1761. 

brooks and islands in the river. I do not than Winslow was of Westbrook ; he was 

assert the roads to be genuine; bnt the set- a brother of James Winslow (1724-1802), 

tiers may shift them where best for the ad- the pioneer settler on the northwestern lot 

vantage of the towns. The roads are eight in the present town of Randolph. Their 

rods wide; the settlers' back lots are 75 father was Nathan Winslow, Sr., a member 

rods wide and one mile long. Planned by of the Society of Friends, who removed 

a scale of 160 rods to one inch. Surveyed from Flymouth to Falmouth prior to 1728, 

by me, Nathan Winslow, sorveyor. Cob- and died in 1773. Nathan Winslow, the 

bisconte, June 17, 1761." Fort Western is surveyor, was for many years clerk to 

noted on the plan and the names of four '' Twelve of the proprietors of the common 

settlers who owned lots, viz : Moses Smith, and undivided land of the township of Fal- 

three and one-half miles above Augusta, mouth," and was long the factotum of the 

and S. Luke Wadsworth, ten miles above, company. 

both on the west side of the river ; William <^ Maine Cultivator and Weekly Gazette, 

Bowdoin and B. Brown, five miles above the of Hallowell, July 11, 1840. 
village on the east side of the river. Na- 



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THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 101 

The members of the committee which then commanded the 
oi^rations of the Plymouth company were broad-minded gen- 
tlemen of expanded business vision, and quite competent to 
direct the large affairs committed to them. The novel — not to 
say ingenious — device of dividing the land among the settlers 
and proprietors according to the Winslow plan, illustrates the 
amplitude of their foresight and the reality of their great prac- 
tical business capacity. The portion of the land remaining to 
the proprietors soon became of more value than the whole would 
have been if none had been given away.^ Before the revolution 
the policy of the company was benevolent and helpful to indus- 
trious home-builders, and not without substantial profit and lar- 
gess to the proprietors. The stoiy of the great land deal on the 
Kennebec would have been different had no mortal conflict come 
between the whigs and tories — had there been no victorious 
patriots and no broken expatriated loyalists. 

There were eighty-four front or river lots depicted on the 
Winslow plan as ready for settlement, in 1761, within the limits 
of ancient Hallo well. Of these numerically fifty-seven were 
allotted to settlers and twenty-seven reserved for the proprie- 
tary. Persons who wished settlers' lots made application to the 
company with a petition substantially like the following:"' 

To the •Proprietors of the Kennebec Purchase from the late Colony of New 
Plymouth : 

Gentlemen : I, the subscriber [William Howard], of [Kennebec] In the 
County of [Cumberland], being desirous of settling within your Purchase, 
pray you would make a Grant to me and my Heirs of the lot numbered [13], 
containing [150] Acres, situated [on west side of Kennebec River] within your 
said purchase. And I hereby engage for myself and Heirs that the conditions 
of said Grant shall be performed, viz : That a Dwelllng-House shall be built 
on the said Lot not less than [20] feet square, that [5] Acres of said Lot shall 
be cleared and made fit for Tillage within [8] Years from the date of the Grant, 
and that I will dwell thereon personally during said [3] years, if living, or In 
case of my Death, that my Heirs, or some person under them, shall dwell on 

• History of the Kennebec Purchase. By was continued bo as to embrace Belgrade, 

Robert Hallowell Gardiner. Coll. Me. Mt. Vernon, Harlem (now China), and a 

Hist. Soc.,Vol. n (1847), p. 284. Pond- part of Winslow. 

town, which included the present towns of ^ The Plymouth Company's printed form 

Winthrop, Readfield and parts of Wayne, of blank. The petition, as printed above, 

was laid out agreeably to a similar plan in is a copy of the one made by William How- 

1771, by John Jones, surveyor. The plan ard for Lot No. 13. 



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102 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



said Premises dnring said Term ; and for the term of Seven Years more, by 
myself or substitute ; and as soon as said Grant shall be made out and ready 
to be delivered to me, I hereby promise to pay your Clerk for the time being, 
[5] shillings LawAil Money for his fee, and [12] shillings Lawftil Money to- 
wards defraying your Expenses for surveying; and you will oblige your peti- 
tioner. Dated this [Ist] day of [November], 17[63]. 

[Signed, William Howard.] " 

The earliest issue of grants to settlers was April 28, 1762, — 
twelve in number ; the next year there were twenty-two, and 
in 17G4, eight. In the bitter year twenty-one were made to 
proprietors or their assignees. By 1770 all of the lots had been 
conveyed excepting the one next to Gardinerston (now 
Randolph).^ Then the most of the lots had received from their 
occupants some measure of improvement and tillage. The 
conventional dwelling-houses required by the terms of the grant 
had genemlly been built — of logs and scantling, — in proximity 
to the river which was the only thoroughfare in the settlement, 
few roads having 3''et been made even from house to house on 
the adjoining lots of the nearest neighbors. The accompanying 
tables exhibit a list of the lots and the names of the persons to 
whom they were granted. The order of the numbering is re- 
versed so that the schedule may conform mechanically to the 
survey and plan, which began with a south line and progressed 
north waixi (pp. 103 and 104). 



'e*- 

• 



8 Writers inclined to pane^rize the Ply- 
month Company have habitually charac- 
terized its policy toward the settlers as gen- 
erous and beneficent. Robert Hallowell 
Gardiner (Hist, of Plymouth Purchase), 
and James W. North (Hist, of Augusta), 
extol its liberality. Both those authors 
were descendants of original members of 
the company. In fact, the terms and con- 
ditions offered to settlers and hopefully ac- 
cepted by them were, under the circum- 
stances, not only onerous but in most cases 
beyond the ability of the settlers to perform. 
The obstacles in the path of the pioneer 
were numerous and severely formidable. 
It may be said "that not less than an aver- 
a^ of thirty days* labor has been given to 
each acre of New England soil to put it 



into arable condition after the forest has 
been remoyed ; nearly as much labor has 
been given in removing the forest under- 
growth ; BO that each cultivated acre in this 
glacial region requures about two months* 
labor before it is in shape for efficient till- 
age.'* (Nathaniel S. Shaler, in Critical 
Hist, of America, Vol. IV, part II, p. xii.) 
No conmion settler within the limits of an- 
cient Hallowell succeeded in performing 
the "settler's duties" first prescribed, so as 
to entitle him to receive the company's 
promised deed. Some succumbed to pov- 
erty, while others, discouraged, removed to 
Sandy river or elsewhere, leaving their im- 
provements for the benefit of the company. 

9 That lot (No. 1, east side) was taken, 
eighteen years later, by Joseph North. 



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THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 103 

Grants to Settlers and Proprietors, West Side. 



o 



34 
33 
32 
81 
30 
29 
28 
27 
26 
25 
24 
23 
22 
21 
20 
19 
18 
17 
16 
15 
14 
13 
12 
11 
10 
9 
8 
I 

6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 



Names of Settlers 
and Proprietors, 



Date of Grant. 



Residence. 



Remarks. 



Eben Bacon, 
James Bacon, 
Tyng and Lowell, 
Morris Wheeler, 
John Ward, 
Charles W. Apthorp 
Moses Smith, 
Jabez Cowan, Jr., 
David Jeffries, 
Abishai Cowan, 
Jabez Cowan, 
John Hancock, 
Adam Carson, 
Elias Taylor, 
Tyng and Lowell, 
William Blake, 
Daniel Townsend, 
N Thwlng & H Weld 
John Nowland, 
David Clark, 
Benjamin Hallowell, 
William Howard, 
William Brooks, 
William Taylor, 
Jonathan Bowman, 
Sylvester Gardiner, 
Gershom Flagg, . 
Peter Hazeltine, 
Josiah French, 
William Vassal, 
Ephraim Cowan, 
Ephraim Bntterfield, 
John Hancock, 
Samuel Howard, 



October 12, 1763, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1763, 
October 9, 1765, 
March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
May 11, 1774, 
March 14, 1764, 
May 11, 1774, 
April 28, 1762. 
March 14, 1764, 
October 9, 1765, 
April 28, 1762, 
March 14, 1764, 
Nov. 14, 1764, 
Nov. 14, 1764, 
Nov. 14, 1764, 
June 14, 1769, 
April 28, 1762, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1763, 
June 13, 1764, 
March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
October 10, 1770, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1763, 
Dec. 12, 1764, 
March 14, 1764, 
June 8, 1763, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
Dec. 14, 1768, 



Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

New York, 

Kennebec, 

Hallowell, 

Boston, 

Hallowell, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Cumberland, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Pownalboro', 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Dunstable, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 



Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler's lot 

Settler's lot 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 



Grjlnts to Settlers and Proprietors, East Side. 



Names of Settlers 
and Proprietors. 



Date of Grant. 



Residence. 



Remarks. 



SOFlorentius Vassal, 



49 



Asa Fisk, 



David Hancock, 
48lUriah Clark, 



March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
Mav 15, 1765, 
October 12, 1763, 



London, Eng. 
Providence, 
Kennebec, 
Kennebec, 



Proprietor. 
Settler. 
Settler. 
Settler, 



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104 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



Names of Settlers 
and Proprietors. 



Date of Grant. 



Residence. 



Remarks. 



47 James Pitts, 
46 Isaac Clark, 
45 Jonas Clark, 
44 James Bowdoin, 
43 William Bacon, 
42 Samuel Tollman, 
41 Sylvester Gardiner, 
40 Samuel Babcock, 
39 Edward Savage, 
38 Sylvester Gardiner, 
37 James Howard, 
36 James Howard, 
35 Read and Nelson, 
34 James Howard, 
33 James Howard, 
32 Paschal Nelson, 
31 Daniel Savage, 
30 Daniel Hilton, 
29 Thomas Hancock, 
28 Maurice Fling, 
27JohnTile8ton, 
26 James Howard, 
25 Seth Greely, 
24 Moses Greely, 
23 James Bayard, 
22 Reuben Colburn, 
21 Ezekiel Page, 
20 Whitmore and Stone 
19 Ezekiel Page, Jr 
18 Jonathan 
17 John Jones, 
16 Noah Kidder, 
15 Ezekiel Chase, 
14 Samuel Goodwin, 
13 Stevens Chase, 
12 Daniel Davis, 
11 John Hancock, 
10 Nathan Davis, 
9 Benjamin Davis, 
8 James Bowdoin, h'rs 
7 James Cocks, 
6 Samuel Bullen, 
5 Edward Goodwin, 
4 Henry McCausland, 
3 Samuel Berry, 
2 Benjamin Hallowell, 
1 Joseph North, 



Davenport Ju 



March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
April 28, 1762, 
March 14, 1764, 
June 13, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 13, 1763, 
Dec. 14, 1768, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1764, 
May 14, 1766, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1763, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
June 14, 1769, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
October 10, 1770, 

1769, 
October 9, 1765, 
October 9, 1765, 
March 14, 1764, 
Nov. 9, 1763, 
June 8, 1763, 
March 4, 1764, 
Nov. 8, 1769, 
ne 8, 1763, 
June 12, 1765, 
June 8, 1763, 
June 28, 1763, 
April 28, 1762, 
April 28, 1763, 
Nov. 9, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
October 12, 1763, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
April 28, 1762, 
October 12, 1763, 
March 14, 1764, 
June 13, 1764, 
Nov. 14, 1764, 
March 14, 1764, 
July 10, 1788, 



Boston, 

Cumberland, 

Cumberland, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 
Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 
Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Dorchester, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Pownalboro', 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston , 

Boston, 

Billerica, 

Charlestown, 

Kennebec, 

Kennebec, 

Boston, 

Hallowell, 



Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Merchant. 

Fort lot. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler's lot 

Settler. 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler. 

Settler 

Proprietors 

Settler. 

Settler. 

Proprietor. 

Settler's lot 

Settler's lot 

Proprietor. 

Settler's lot 



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THE SETTLEMENT OF HALLOWELL. 105 

The distinction of being the pioneer settler at Cushnoc, 
rightfully falls to Captain James Howard, who came to the place 
with the party that built Fort Western in 1754, and lived here 
continuously the rest of his life. As commandant ofthe garrison 
and resident factotum of the Plymouth Company, he was the 
principal personage on the river between Foil Shirley and Fort 
Halifax so long as his military authority lasted ; and when peace 
came to the land he engaged sturdily in utilizing its blessings, 
and was the foremost among his contemporaries in developing 
the hamlet which had germinated about Fort Western. Ho be- 
came relatively the wealthiest, and in influence by far the most 
potential citizen of ancient Hallo well. The earliest settlers at 
what is now the urban part of Hallowell were Pease Clark and 
his son Peter, who came from Attleborough in the Province 
vessel which arrived with supplies for forts Western and Halifax, 
in the spring of 1762. They made their first clearings on land 
that is now partly occupied by the old cotton factory and city 
hall buildings ; and they built their dwelling house within what 
is now the southwesterly angle of Second and Academy Streets 
on the slope of a hill which has been removed. Pease Clark 
had six sons including Peter, all of whom came to the Kennel)ec 
and were settlers in ancient Hallowell. Descendants of the 
families of both James Howard and Pease Clark are living in 
Augusta and Hallowell to this day. 



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CHAPTER V. 
HALLO WELL A TOWNSHIP. 

The first decade after the fall of Quebec witnessed a great 
change of scene throughout a wide extent of the Plymouth Com- 
pany's territor3\ The proprietora were indefatigable in pushing 
their lands into the market and in persuading tenants to come 
and occupy, and raze the forest, and ripen into permanent 
settlers and farm proprietors. As a result there was a goodly 
influx of immigration to the Kennebec, the incomers tarrying as 
they were best suited at various points from Pownalborough to 
Fort Halifax. They were generally yeomen of sturdy puritan 
ancestry, — industrious, capable, and in some cases deeply 
religious, 

They were rather a careful selection of men by the proprietors 
for a specific purpose instead of the ordinary aggregation of 
adventurers to a new country. It was the fastidious policy of 
the comimny during the era of its greatest and most beneficent 
activity before the revolution, to allow its lands to go into the 
possession of only persons of approved character who would be 
good citizens in the new community. The fruits of that policy 
have been apparant in the industrial, social and intellectual 
prominence of some of the early Kennebec towns during the 
whole period of their history. 

In the year 1762, the population within the limits of what 
nine years later became the township of Hallowell was less than 
thirty souls, including the residents at Fort Western, and the 
only habitations then visible to the eye exclusive of the fort 
were seven in number, and those of the description and character 
called log huts ; of these three were on the bank of the river op- 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 107 

posite the present city of Hallowell. The other four were with- 
in the present limits of Augusta, two upon each side of the 
river, — one being upon the present site of the Arsenal, and occu- 
pied by Moses and Seth Greely (father and son). Those upon 
the west side were in the present fifth ward, and the names of 
Alden Carson and Abishai Cowan are given as the occupants ; 
and these were the only inhabitants or habitations on the west 
side of the river from Gardinerston northerly.* 

The territory embraced by the Winslow survey of 1761, and 
the two or three most northerly lots of the earlier John North 
survey, must have received by the year 1770 a population of 
at least two hundred persons — men, women and children. At 
Ticonic there was also a well ordered settlement, with Fort Hal- 
ifax as its nucleus. A survey had been made for the purposes 
of the proprietors of a lai^e territory west of the river, called 
Pondtown, and a vigorous colony of settlers successfully in- 
stalled on the same. These scattered settlements were without 
division lines and had no manner of civil government or re- 
presentation in the legislature. There were no public roads, 
nor schools nor houses of worship. All the facilities for the 
local execution of the laws were lacking. The circumstances of 
the community made some sort of organization not only desir- 
able but necessary. 

The settlements being far remote from the political and legis- 
lative circles were of themselves quite helpless in their isolation 
and obscurity ; but they had powerful patrons and guardians at 
court whose personal and proper self-interests were deeply in- 
volved in the growth and prosperity of the plantations which 
they themselves had fondly planted. The Plymouth Company 
through the instrumentality of its strenuous and honorable com- 
mittee procured of the general court on the 26th of April, 1771, 
the passage of four bills incorporating as many townships in the 
valley of the Kennebec, namely: Hallowell, Vassalboi-ough , 
Winslow, and Winthrop. This appears to have been the last 
important act of the company before the wrecking of the in- 

1 Daniel WUIiamfl' Lecture, 1830. MS. 



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108 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



fluence and fortunes of its most potential members by the tem- 
pest of the revolution. 

The petition which the pioneers presented to the Legislature 
for the incorporation of Hallowell was as follows. 

To His Excelly Thomas Hutchinson, Esq.. Captain-€reneral| Governor and 
Commander-in-Chief in and over his Majesty's province of the Massachu- 
setts Bay In New England ; To the Honble his Migesty's Council and 
Honbie House of Representatives. 

Humbly sheweth : — That your petitioners, the subscribers, Inhabitants of a 
plantation on Kennebeck River In the County of Lincoln, within the Plymouth 
Purchase, are settled on the East and West side of sd River, and Labour under 
many hardships usually attending new settlements, being without the common 
privilidges of other people within this province — having no Gospel Minister, 
School Master, or any officer whatever, which Is absolutely necessary for the 
Good Order and well being both of us and our posterity, if we were invested 
with the power and privilidges of a Town it would greatly incourage the Set- 
tlement, Peace and good order of it. Therefore we most Humbly pray your 
Excelly and honors that we may be incorporated into a Town and have all the 
privilidges of other Towns within this province, by the following Butts and 
Bounds, viz. : [the same as are given in the act,] as will appear by the an- 
nexed plan [drawn on the back of the petition, six and one-half by eleven 
inches]. And as many changes will naturally arise in a new Country, and We 
being in General very poor, therefore most Humbly pray your Excelly and 
Honors to Exempt us from paying Province Taxes in Ten Years to come, or 
otherwise relieve your Petitioners. And as we in Duty Bound shall ever pray. 

Kennebeck River, Deer, 1770.* 

James Howard, Briggs Hallowell, 

Pease Clark, John Taylor, 

Samuel Howard, Sen., William Sprage, 



Adam Carson, 
Jabez Cowing, 
Peter Clark, 
Ellas Taylor, 
Morris Wheeler, 
Moses Smith, 
William Carson, 
David Clark, 
Abisha Cowen, 
Jabez Cowen, Junr., 
Uriah Clark, 
Isaac Clark, 
Ebenezer Taylor, 
William Howard. 



Samuel Tolman, 
Tomahos Tolman, 
John Pedrick, 
David Savage, 
Edward Savage, 
David Wale, 
Joseph Stone, 
Ebenezer Davenport, 
Simeon Clark, 
Samuel Badcock, 
Ephraim Butterfleld, 
BenJ. Runels, 
Ephm. Cowen, 
Emerson Smith. 



Edward Kilton, 
David Thomas, 
John Robings, 
Peter Hopkins, 
AbtJah Reed, 
John Gllley, 
Jonathan Davenport, 
Daniel Halton, 
Moses Greele, 
Joseph Greele, 
Joseph Divingport, 
Seth Geole, 
Jonas Clark, 
David Cobb, 
Ezeklel Page, Senr. 



3 Mass. Archlyes, Maps and Plans, No. 784. Copied by Rnssell P. Eaton, February, 1902. 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 109 

The following is the act of incorporation. 

An Act for incorporating a certain tract of land in the connty of Lincoln 
into a Township by the name of Hallowell. 

Whereas the inhabitants of a certain tract of land lying on the east and 
and west sides of Kennebec River, in the county of Lincoln are desirous of 
enjoying the privileges that will arise to them by being incorporated Into a 
Town. 

Be it enacted by the Governor, Council and House of Representatives* that 
the tract of land aforesaid, butted and bounded as folio we th, viz : Beginning 
on the east side of Kennebec river, at the north line of James Winslow's laud, 
lying within a thirty-two hundred acre lot number twelve, and to run east 
south-east live miles ft:om said river; Arom thence to run northerly about nine 
miles more or less on such a course as that it may meet the easterly end of a 
line running east south-east five miles from Kennebec river, along the north- 
erly side of the lot number fifty ; then to run west northwest on the last 
mentioned line to Kennebec river and to run on the same west northwest 
course across said river to the end of five miles on the west side thereof; 
from thence to run southerly such a course as to strike the most easterly part 
of the northerly end of Cobbosseecontee Great pond ; from thence to run 
on the easterly side of said Pond to the stream issuing out of the same, called 
Cobbosseecontee Stream ; Arom thence to run southerly on the easterly side of 
said stream till it meets a west north-west line running Arom Kennebec river 
along the southerly line of Mr. William Bowman's land (which is the north- 
erly half of a thirty-two hundred acre lot number twenty) from thence to ran 
east south-east on the last mentioned line to Kennebec river, and over said 
river to the first mentioned bounds ; be and hereby Is erected into a Town- 
ship by the name of Hallowell ; and that the inhabitants thereof be and here- 
by are invested with all the powers, privileges, and immunities which the in- 
habitants of any of the towns within this Province respectively do or by law 
ought to enjoy. 

And be it further enacted that James Howard, Esq., be and he is hereby im- 
powered to issue his warrant for the purpose of calling the first meeting of 
the inhabitants. 

April 2G, 1771. This bill having been read three several times in the House 
of Representatives, passed to be enacted. Thomas Cushing, Speaker. 

April 26, 1771. This bill having been read three several times in Council, 
passed to be enacted. Thomas Flucker, Secretary. 

April 26, 1771. By the Governor. I consent to the enacting of this bill. 

T. Hutchinson. 

♦ Attest : Wm. Tudor, Secretary of State. 

The first town-meeting duly called by James Howard, was 
held within four weeks after the passage of the act. Of this 
meeting we have no info nnat ion beyond the record made of it 
by the town clerk, which follows. 



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110 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



Lincoln, ss. Hallowell, May 22, 1771. At a meeting of the Areeholders and 
other inhabitants of this town at Fort Western, being the first town-meeting 
after we were incorporated, the town made choice of Deacon Pease Clark fur 
the moderator, and the following [named] officers to serve the town for the 
year ensuing, viz: Jonathan Davenport, town clerk; constable, Samuel 
Bullen; selectmen: Pease Clark, James Howard, Esq., and Jonathan Daven- 
port; town treasurer, James Howard, Esq. ; wardens : Samuel Howard and 
Samuel Badcock ; tythingmen : Daniel Savage, Peter Hopkins ; deer-reeves : 
Jonathan Davenport and Moses Greely ; fence- viewers : Adam Carson, Ben- 
jamin White; hog-reeves: Abijah Read, Ebenezer Davenport, and Emerson 
Smith; surveyors of highways : Ezekiel Page [senior], Peter Clark, Peter 
Hopkins, Abisha Cowan and David Cobb ; surveyors of boards, shingles and 
timber: James Cocks, Edward Savage. ' 

James Howard, Esq., is appointed to provide a town book at the town 
charge to keep the town records. 

Voted for a county treasurer and county register. 

July the first, the above persons have all taken their oaths.^ 

About 8ix weeks later another town meeting was held at the 
same place. 

July 1, 1771. Chosen moderator for the meeting. Deacon Pease Clark. 

Voted for a county treasurer. 

Voted to have the town roads from the lower end of the town on the east 
side of the river to Fort Western ; as also a road up and down on the west 
side as far as the town runs ; and voted to have the roads cleared by way of 
rate ; labor set at four shillings a day for a man, and two shillings and eight 
pence for a yoke of oxen. 

Voted to have thirty-six pounds raised towards clearing the roads. 

Voted to have ten pounds raised towards laying out the roads, and running 
the line round the town, and other necessary uses. 

Voted to have all the meadows within the town to be kept for the benefit of 
the people of said town of Hallowell. 

Voted to have but one meeting-house, and to have it in the middle of the 
upper part of the town. 

Voted to have the selectmen send a petition to the proprietors in the town's 
behalf, to request a ministerial lot; also a lot for a meeting-house and bury- 
ing place and training-field; and to see if they would grant to the town all the 



8 The persons then qualified by law to be 
voters in town affairs were those twenty- 
one years old or more, who paid "one single 
tax besides the poll or polls a sum equal to 
two-thirds of a single poll tax." 

4 The town meetings of Hallowell, from 
1771 to 1797, were held at the following 
named places : 

Fort Western, 34 times 1771-81 

Ezekiel Page's house, 4 1772-73 



Seth Greely 's bam, 
Josiah French's inn, 
Thomas Sewall's house, 
Daniel Savage's inn, 
Elias Craig's house. 
Town Meeting house, 
Amos Pollard's inn. 
The Court House, 
Hallowell Academy, 



1 


1773 


1 


1773 


4 


177V2 


1 


1781 


2 


1782 


63 


1783-91 


3 


1785-87 


19 


1791-97 


1 


1795 



•123 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. Ill 

roads that are left between the lots within the town of Hallo well, granting 
liberty to move sach of them as may be to the advantage of the public; the 
town leaving to every person their Aill quantity of land, and the town settling 
with the settlers as to their part. 

The road voted for on the east side of the river was sub- 
stantially on the location of the present direct highway be- 
tween Cony Square and Randolph. Northerly from Fort West- 
ern the Shirley- Winslow road which had been cut through the 
forest seventeen yeara before, was serviceable. On the west 
side of the river, a road was called for the entire length of the 
town from the plantation of Gardinerston to the Vassalborough 
line. The petition to the proprietors for sundry lots of land 
for public uses, which the town hud reasons to expect would be 
cheerfully granted, fell upon deaf ears at Boston and did not 
receive a ready response.^ The Plymouth company was rap- 
idly approaching a condition of abject desuetude through the 
toryism of a majority of its influential members, and never 
again assisted generously any of the towns which had been es- 
tablished by its patronage and influence. 

March 2, 1772. The annual town meeting was held at Ezekiel Page's 
dwelling-house. 

Voted that the roads be approbated, and for the selectmen to alter them 
where they thinlc proper ; and voted that there be two hundred and fifty days' 
work upon the roads this year, to be levied upon the polls and estates. 

Voted that there be two pounds; one to be at Mr. Ezekiel Page's, and the 
other to be at Mr. Emerson Smith's ; and Mr. Page and Mr. Smith be pound- 
keepers. 

Voted that there be fifteen pounds raised for the necessary charges for the 
town. 

The first tax-list (that for 1771) is not now in existence ; but 
in the year next following a province tax was laid upon the town 
of £13, 4s., Id., and the selectmen's assessment for the same has 
been preserved. It is the earliest full list of Ilallovvell tax- 
payers extant, and shows who were the taxable inhabitants here 
in 1772, their relative possession of property, and the number of 
polls (ninety-nine) resident in the town. Male minors sixteen 
years old or more were at that time taxable to their parents or 

6 See Tote of town, March 10, 1783, and note. 



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112 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



guardians for a poll tax. There were seven such minors here 
in 1772 according to the list. An alphabetical arrangement of 
the names and some corrections in spelling are the only altera- 
tions of the original paper, which is printed below. The names 
in italic are of those persons who lived in the part of the town 
which continued to be Hallowell after the division twenty-five 
years later. 

The Tax List of 1772. 

A rate or assessment laid upon the polls and estates, both real and personal 
npon the inhabitants of the Town of Hallowell, for raising the sum of thirteen 
poands, four shillings and one penny, being a tax laid upon this town by the 
Province for deft-aying the necessary charges of the Province. 



NAMES. 


Polls. 


Real 
Estate. 


Personal 
Estate. 


Total. 




£ 8. 


d. f. 


£ B. d. f. 


£ 8. d. f. 


£ 8. d. f. 


Edmund Allen, 




9 




2 i 


1 11 i 


Oliver Allen, 




9 






1 9 


Ephraim Butterfield, 




9 




10 


2 7 


Samuel Badcock, 




6 


10 


7 


4 11 


Samuel Badcock, Jr., 




9 




8 i 


2 5 i 


Henry Badcock, 




9 






1 9 


James Boltou, 




9 




6 


2 3 


George Bolton, 




6 


6 


10 


4 10 


Samuel Bullen^ 




9 


2 4 


1 2 i 


5 3 i 


Silas Brooks, 




9 






1 9 


John Burrill, 


A 


9 






1 9 


Ephraim Cowen, 




9 


4 


8 i 


2 9 i 


Abishai Cowen, 


- 


9 


9 


1 2 i 


3 8 i 


Adam Covch^ 


1 


9 


9 i 


11 J 


8 6 


Samuel Chamberlain, 




9 






1 9 


Ezekiel Chase's farm ^ 






2 6 




2 6 


Simeon Clark, 




9 


8 i 


8 i 


8 1 i 


Jonas Clark, 




9 


9 


5 


2 11 


David Clark, 




9 




6 


2 3 


Uriah Clark, 




9 


5 i 


1 2 


S 4 i 


Pease Clark, 




9 


1 7 


6 i 


3 10 X 
3 10 1 
3 


Isaac Clark, 




9 


1 7 


6 i 


Peter Clark, 




9 


10 


5 


William Carson, 




9 


^ i 


6 f 


2 8 4 
5 2 4 
8 1 I 

3 i 
2 11 4 


Adam Carson, 




9 


2 


1 5 i 


David Cobb, 




9 


4 i 


1 


James Cocks, 




9 


7 i 


8 


Ebenezer Church, 




9 


3 i 


10 i 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 

The Tax List of 1772,— continued. 



118 



NAMES. 


Polls. 


Real 
Estate. 


Personal 
Estate. 


Total. 




£ s. d. f. 


£ s. d. f. 


£ 8. d. f. 


£ 8. d. f. 


Jonathan Daoenport, 




1 10 


9 J 


2 7 J 


Joseph Davenport, 


1 9 




^ k 


2 2:; 


Ebenezer Davenport, 


1 9 


8 


2 i 


2 2 :; 


Josiah Davenport, 


1 9 






1 9 


Ifathaniel Davis, 


1 9 


9 


2 i 


2 8 i 


Jonathan Donee, 


1 9 






1 9 


Samuel DtUton, 


1 9 




1 2 i 


2 11 i 


Asa Emerson, 


1 9 






1 9 


William Emerson, 


1 9 






1 9 


John Esterbrook, 


1 9 






1 9 


Josiah French, 


1 9 


9 


2 9 


5 8 


Nathaniel Floyd, 


1 9 






1 9 


George Fitzgerald, 


1 9 


2 i 




111 i 


Joseph Greely, 


1 9 






1 9 


Moses Greely, 




3 


8 i 


6 i 


Seth Greely, 


1 9 


4 i 


9 


2 10 ^ 


John Gilley, 


1 9 


6 


10 


8 1 


John Gray, 


1 9 


2 i 


8 i 


2 7 J 


Hannah Gay, 




1 4 


1 


2 4 


James Howard, Esq., 


1 9 




9 6 f 


11 8 1 
8 4 1 


Samuel Howard, 


1 9 


4 i 


1 8 1 


William Howard, 


1 9 




8 9 


5 6 


John Hankerson, 


8 6 


6 


6 


4 6 


Obed HuBsey, Esq., 


8 6 


6 f 


6 


4 6 S 


Daniel Hilton, 


1 9 


1 } 


8 1 


2 7 


Nathaniel Hersey, 


1 9 






1 9 


Paer Hopkins, 


1 9 




2 


1 11 


Briggs HaUoweU, 


1 9 




8 9 


5 6 


Thomas HinMey, 


1 9 




♦ 


1 9 


Ebenezer Hovey, 


1 9 






1 9 


John Jones, 


1 9 


9 


6 


8 


John Jewett, 


1 9 






1 9 


James Johnson, 


1 9 






1 9 


William Lancy, 


1 9 






1 9 


Josiah Mitchell, 


1 9 






1 9 


John Nowland, 


1 9 


S i 


10 J 


8 f 


Ezekiel Page, 


8 6 


2 8 1 


2 


7 9 1 


Ezekiel Page, Jr., 


1 9 


6 i 


8 i 


2 11 A 


Abraham Page, 


1 9 






1 9 


John Pedrick, 


1 9 






1 9 


Samuel Perham, 


1 9 






1 9 


Samuel Plummer, 


1 9 






1 9 



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114 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



The Tax List of 1772, — concluded. 



NAMES. 


Polls. 


Real 
Estate 


. 


Personal 
Estate. 


Total. 




£ 8. d. f. 


£ 8. d. 


f. 


£ 8. d. f. 


£ s. 


d. f. 


Alexander Robinson, 


1 9 






8 * 


2 


5 


John Rambol, 


1 9 








1 


9 


John Robbing, 


1 9 


2 




2 


2 


11 


Abijab Read, 


1 9 


10 


i 


6 i 


3 


1 f 


Daniel Savage, 


1 9 


10 


i 


2 6 


5 


1 i 


Joseph Savage, 


1 9 






6 


2 


3 


Edward Savage, 


1 9 


1 6 




4 


3 


7 


Isaac Savage, 


1 9 






1 


2 


9 


William Spragne, 


1 9 


5 


i 


•7 


2 


9 i 


Phillip Snow, 


1 9 


4 


i 


8 i 


2 


9 4 


Emerson Smith, 


1 9 


1 


1 


8 i 


2 


6 1 


Abel Stevens, 


1 9 








1 


9 


John Shaw, 


1 9 








1 


9 


Silas Sargent, 


1 9 








1 


9 


David Thomas, 


1 9 


3 




1 i 


3 


i 


Daniel Townsend, 


1 9 








1 


9 


Elias Taylor, 


8 6 


5 




10 


4 


9 


Ebenezer Taylor, 


1 9 


2 




2 


2 


1 


Samuel Tollman, 


1 9 


5 


i 


2 i 


4 


2 J 


Thomas Tollman, 


1 9 


5 


i 


10 


8 


i 


William Usher, 


1 9 








1 


9 


Benjamin White, 


8 6 


1 11 


f 


1 8 i 


6 


9 k 


Morris Wheeler, 


1 9 


4 


^ 


1 1 


8 


2 1 


David Wall, 


1 9 






6 


2 


3 


Israel Woodcock, 


1 9 








1 


9 


David Ware. 


I 9 








1 


9 



£18 17 5 I 



Peter Hopkins, 
Daniel Savage, 
Samuel Badcock, 
James Cocks, 
EzEKiEL Page, 



Selectmen. 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 



115 



The town clerks' records of ancient Hallowell have fortunately 
been preserved, and while brief and formal they constitute the 
only existing reservoir of accessible facts and information illus- 
trative of the early life of the town. These records were orig- 
inally written bj*^ the respective clerks on sheets of letter-paper 
sewed together in groups of quires or half-quires, and placed for 
safe-keeping with the family bible and other precious books of 
the household. When Daniel Cony filled the office (1785-'87) 
his appreciation of system and his clerical taste prompted him 
to copy in one book all of the records of his predecessors. Suc- 
ceeding town clerks used the same book for their records until 
the division of the town in 1797.^ 

March 15, 1773. The annaal meeting was at *'the house of Mr. Josiah 
French, Innholder.'* In electing the town officers it was — 

Voted that John Jones be constable, and voted also for Jonas Clark to be 
constable. 

Adjonmed to meet at the house of Ezekiel Page, Senior, at nine o*clock on 
the following day. First voted to reconsider the votes for choosing John 
Jonos and Isaac Clark constables, and proceeded to a new vote, and voted 
that Benjamin White be constable this year. 

Voted to have fifteen pounds raised to defray the necessary charges of the 
town. 

Voted that there be one hundred and sixty days' work laid on the estates 
[for roads], thirty shillings per day. 

Voted that James Howard, Esq., and Samuel Badcock, William Howard, 
Daniel Savage, and Jonathan Davenport, be appointed a committee to act 
upon drawing something relattng to [the] Pamphlet sent from the town of 
Boston to this town.^ 

« This old book of records was the joint 
heritage of both towns; and two copies 
were made of its contents in the years 1813 
and 1814, by John Sewall (1755-1827), then 
town clerk of Hallowell. One of these 
copies came into the possession of the town 
of Angnsta by pnrchase, Feb. 14, 1820, and 
is volnme one of its records ; the other one 
is in that of Hallowell. The cblrography 
was made with a quill pen ; it is fine, regu- 
lar, and on some pages even beautiful. (See 
Bibliography of Augusta.) 

7 The inhabitants of the town of Boston 
chose in November, 1772, twenty-one of 
their respectable citizens, as a committee to 



correspond with their fellow citizens in the 
province, and to publish to the world an 
account of tbeir proceedings. This com- 
mittee of correspondence was the basis of 
the subsequent union of the colonies. The 
committee soon made a report, charging 
parliament with violating the colonial 
rights, and the assumption of arbitrary 
power. The report was accepted and print- 
ed in a pamphlet and six hundred copies 
were circulated through the towns and dis- 
tricts of the province, with a letter ad- 
dressed to the inhabitants. The letter end- 
ed thus : ** Let us consider, brethren, we are 
struggling for our best birthrights and in 



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116 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

Sept. 21, 177S. At a meeting legally warned and met at Seth Greeley's 
bam, it was voted to adjoarn to Fort Western. 

Voted to have the roads run at the back end of the ftront lots, according to 
the plan drawed by Nathan Winslow, surveyor; and to run from lot No. 1, on 
each side of the river to the upper end of the town. 

March 15, 1774. Annual meeting, voted that swine shall run at large, being 
yoked according to law. Voted that fifteen pounds be raised for the necessary 
charges of the town, voted that there be two days laid upon the polls to work 
on the highways, and one hundred and sixty days on the estates. 

March 20, 1775. Was chosen moderator, Samuel Bullen ; town clerk, Jona- 
than Davenport ; selectmen, Jonathan Davenport, Nathaniel Floyd, and Dea- 
con Pease Clark ; constable, John Jones; treasurer, James Howard, Esq. Re- 
considered the constable vote, purged the meeting — and made choice of John 
Jones again. 

Voted to have the highways done by way of rate ; to allow four shillings a 
day for a man, and two shillings and eight pence for a yoke of oxen. Voted 
sixty pounds for the roads. 

April 10, 1775, Accepted of Jonas Clark for a constable in the room of 
John Jones, as he has hired him to serve in his room.^ 

Voted to choose a committee [of correspondence] of five men, and for one 
of them to go to Falmouth. Voted for James Howard, Esq., James Cocks, 
Captain William Howard, Pease Clark, for the committee, and for the man 
that goes to Falmouth to be paid by the town. Voted twelve pounds to de- 
fray the charges of the committee-man and other necessary uses. 

Voted for the selectmen to provide a town stock, as the law directs, and to 
make an assessment directly for the same. 

May 1, 1775. Voted for James Howard, Esq., to be a delegate to go to 
Pownalborough to meet the committee of correspondence of several neigh- 
boring towns, in order to act in behalf of this town, in order to get provisions 
and ammunition; and also voted for him to act on any affair in behalf of this 
town. 

Voted for five men to be chosen for a committee to inspect any disorder, 
&c. Voted for James Howard, Esq., Deacon Pease Clark, Lieut. Samuel 
Howard, Mr. Ezeklel Page, and Lieut. David Thomas, to be the committee. 

May 29, 1775. Voted not to send a man to the Provincial Congress. 

July 10, 1775. Meeting made choice of Captain William Howard to repre- 
sent the town in the General Court. 

heritance, which being infringed renders s The contest of the whigs with the toiy 
all onr blessings precarious in their enjoy- Jones and his followers now seems trivial, 
ment, and consequently trifling in their but at that time constables were relatively 
value. Let us disappoint the men who are important officers, being ex officio the col- 
raising themselves on the ruin of this lectors of taxes, and necessarily very near 
country. Let us convince every invader of the people in the exercise of their never 
our freedom that we will be as free as the very popular duties. 
Constitution our Fathers recognized will 
justify." 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 



117 



The notable event of the presence in the town of Arnold's 
army in September, 1775, en route to Quebec, is nowhere men- 
tioned in the records. As illustrating the size or rather the 
smallness of the hamlet then extending along the river for about 
three and a half miles, the accompanying sketch is introduced. 
This engraving is a reduced /ac simile of the only known map 
of ancient Hallowell. The original (nine by fifteen inches) 
appears to have been made by a person of some skill as a 
dniughtsman — probably a surveyor, and possibly John Jones, 
the ex-tory. The evident purpose of the maker was to show 
the relative positions of the settlei-s' houses on both sides of the 
river between the line of Howard's (Riggs') brook and the 
southerly part of the then town in the year 1775. The names 
of some of the residents are given in full and others only in 
part, which fact indicates that the sketch may have been drawn 
or dictated from imperfect memory yeara after the passing of 
Arnold's army, by some elderly person who was recalling the 
size of the settlement at the time of that event. 



Taxpayers of Hallowell for the 

Edmnnd Allen, 

Oliver Allen, 

Ephraim Butterfield, 

Samuel Badoock, 

Samnel Badcock, Jr., 

Henry Badcock, 

James Bolton, 

George Bolton, 

Samnel Bullen, 

Silas Brooks, 

John Bnrrill, 

Ephraim Cowen, 

Abishai Cowen, 

Adam Conch 

Samnel Chamberlain, 

Ezekiel Chase, 

Simeon Clark, 

Jonas Clark, 

David Clark, 

Uriah Clark, 

Pease Clark, 

Isaac Clark, 

Peter Clark, 

William Carson, 

Adam Carson, 

David Cobb, 

James Cocks, 

Ebenezer Chnrch, 

Jonathan Davenport 

Joseph Davenport, 

Ebenezer Davenport, 

Josiah Davenport. 



year 1772. 

Nathaniel 

Jonathan 

Samuel 

Asa 

William 

John 

Josiah 

Nathaniel 

George 

Joseph 

Moses 

Seth 

John 

John 

Hannah 

James 

Samnel 

William 

John 

Obed 

Daniel 

Nathaniel 

Peter 

Briggs 

Thomas 

Ebenezer 

John 

John 

James 

William 

Josiah 

John 



Davis, 

Douce, 

Dutton, 

Emmerson, 

Emmerson, 

Esterbrook, 

French, 

Floyd, 

Fitzgerald, 

Greely, 

Greely, 

Greely, 

Gilley, 

Grav, 

Gay, 

Howard, 

Howard, 

Howard, 

Hankerson, 

Hnssey, 

Hilton, 

Hersey, 

Hopkins, 

Hallowell, 

Hinkley, 

Hovey, 

Jones, 

Jewett, 

Johnson, 

Lancy, 

Mitchell. 

Nowland. 



Ezekiel 

Ezekiel 

Abraham 

John 

Samnel 

Samuel 

Alexander 

John 

John 

Abijah 

Daniel 

Joseph 

Edward 

Isaac 

William 

Philip 

Emerson 

Abel 

John 

Silas 

David 

Daniel 

Ellas 

Ebenezer 

Samuel 

Thomas 

William 

Benjamin 

Morris 

David 

Israel 

David 



Pane, Jr. 

Pe^ck, 

Perham, 

Plummer, 

Robinson, 

Rnmbol, 

Bobbins, 

Read, 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Spragne, 

Snow, 

Smith, 

Stevens, 

Shaw, 

Sargent, 

Thomas, 

Townsend, 

Taylor, 

Taylor, 

Tolman, 

Tolman, 

Usher, 

White, 

Wheeler, 

Wall, 

Woodcock, 

Ware. 



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118 



HISTORr OF AUGUSTA. 



The lines of the various Jots are disregarded, and all of the 
distances are more or less distorted ; but a few of the monu- 
ments then existing have never been moved and assist us to 
identify to-day the places where many of the houses represented 
stood. Scanning southerly from Howard brook we first see in- 
dicated James Howard's "Great House," where Arnold lodged ; 
there was one lot (50 rods) between it and Daniel Savage's; 
next is Daniel Thomas' house, which was the first inn in the 
hamlet. Three or four lots below was George Brown, who 
first appears in the records of 1775, and whose given name, like 
those of seven others, the artist apparently did not know ; Brown 
must have been a patriot, for he was summoned in 1777 as a 
witness in court against the tory, John Jones. Two or three 
lots southerly is Fort Western with its two block-houses and 
two sentry-boxes, but the owner's name, as in the case of the 
"Great House," is significantly omitted, as if the modesty of 
Captain Howard himself or that of his son William was some- 
how connected with the sketch. Next below the fort are Seth 
and Joseph Greely, brothers, and their first neighbor below is 
William McMasters, who was here before 1773. 

On the first or second lot southerly is Deacon Ezekiel Page, 
called '*01d Mr. Page," to distinguish him from his son on the 
second lot below. It was at the house of this "Old Mr. Page" 
that the town meeting was held in 1772. 

Between father and son appears Jonathan Davenport, who 
may have been living there temporarily in the year 1775, but 
whose ^n«e place on the plan was southerly of Ezekiel, jun., 
and which is now the northernmost farm in Chelsea. The fol- 
lowing houses vvere all in the present Chelsea ; Adam Couch, 
who first appears as a tax-payer in 1772 ; Ezekiel ChviSQ (nearly 



Additional taxpayers, 1773 


John 


Bradley, 


Davis 


Bradford, 


Daniel 


Bolton, 


Thomas 


Col burn, 


Jab3z 


Clough, 


Jeremiah 


Campbell, 


Noah 


Champney, 


James 


Gordon, 


Jonathan 


Ellis. 



James 


Hinkley, 


Shnbal 


Hinkley, 


Moses 


Hudson, 


David 


Hancock, 


Patrick 


Kenney, 


Samuel 


Kennady, 


Gershom F 


. Lane, 


Isaac 


Lovejoy, 


Reuben 


Page. 



John 


Pomroy, 


John 


Puffer, 


Thomas 


Reardon, 


James 


Robinson, 


David 


Streeter, 


Wm. 


McMaster, 


John 


McGaw, 


Wm. 


Whittier. 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 119 

opposite the present Hallowell ferry) had been a settler since 
1762, and in 1777 he was chosen to be a witness against "Black" 
Jones; Benjamin White, fence-viewer in 1771, and constable 
in 1773 ; Obed Hussey, first taxed in 1772 ; Captain James Cox, 
an original settler in 1762 ; Deacon Samuel Bullen, an original 
settler, and a witness to the toryism of Jones. The five re- 
maining lots between Deacon Bullen's and the present Randolph 
line seem to have been tenantless. On the west side of the river 
the upper house represented is that of Samuel Chamberlain, of 
whom there is no record before 1784; his nearest neighbor was 
a Bolton, cither George or James, who were in the tax list of 
1772. The name of the occupant of the next house was un- 
known to the artist. Bond's brook is called Ellis' brook, pos- 
sibly for John Ellis, who was here in 1773, and who may have 
succeeded temporarily to the John Jones mill which is plainly 
indicated astride the stream. 

The house of Asa Emerson stood near the present corner of 
Court and Water streets ; he soon sold out to the father of Chief 
Justice Weston and went to Waterville (then Winslow), where 
his name was for many years borne by Emerson stream (now 
Messalonskee). Josiah French's house was where Grove and 
Green streets now unite.® On the next lot lived Emerson 
Smith, taxed in 1773, and elected a hog-reeve ; next below him 
lived Ephraim Cowan, an original settler, adjoining whom was 
liobei't Kennedy, who owned the brook that took his name. 
Lieutenant Samuel Howard owned the lot that now adjoins the 
Hallowell line. Howard hill (495 feet) was named for his 
daughter Betsy. Shubael Hinkley who lived a quarter of a mile 
below, gave with other members of his family the name to 
Hinkley's plains. Deacon Pease Clark and his son, Peter, lived 
near the site of the present Hallowell cotton factory. Below 
is another nameless house, and the last one is that of BricrSTS 
Hallowell, just north of Kedumcook (Vaughan) stream, and 
on or near the spot now covered by the power station of the 

9 Josiah French remoYed from the town to Winthrop (now Eeadfield) in the 
snmmer of 1778. 



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120 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

Augusta, Hallowell and Gardiner Street Railway Company. The 
great elm trees near by are possible relics of the ancient home- 
stead. Briggs Hallowell lived on his father's (Benjamin) un- 
divided land and sold lots from the same. The sketch shows 
thirty buildings, exclusive of the fort and mill, and aflSxes 
names to twenty-eight of them. There were other dwellings at 
the time northerly from Howard's brook, on both sides of the 
river. The author of the map did not consider the stream since 
called Ballard's brook, opposite Howard's, nor Kennedy's 
brook and Kedumcook stream worth indicating.*® 

March 11, 1776. The election of the town officers. The meeting was an- 
event All. 

March 10, 1777. Voted that Col. William Howard, Messrs. Ezeklel Page, 
Senior, David Thomas, Jonas Clark, John Shaw, Senior, Samael BuUen, and 
Levi Robinson, be a committee of Inspection and safety of the town the pres- 
ent year. 

Voted that the delinquent surveyors do work out their arrearages. 

April 14f 1777. It was voted that the road be approbated trom Lieut. Joslah 
French's brook at the north side of his lot at the river to the south side of said 
lot, and trom thence on or near the line between said French's and Smith's 
land to the west end of said lot. 

Voted that Lieut. John Shaw be the man to inspect the torles, and make in- 
formation thereof. 

Voted that the road trom the mile rock, at Mr. Eennady's to the end of 
Joslah French's lot at Burnt Hill, so-called, be discontinued." 

July 17, 1777. Voted Jonathan Davenport moderator to regulate said 
meeting. 

Agreeable to an Act of the General Court of the State of Massachusetts 
Bay, entitled **An Act for the preservation of this and the other United Amer- 
ican States trom the danger to which they are exposed f^om the internal ene- 
mies thereof;" the town made choice by ballot of Lieut. John Shaw to procure 
and lay before the Court, described In said Act, evidence against John Jones 

10 The copy of this long-lost map was was discontinued b^nse the road over Jo 
made by Benjamin F. Chandler, and it was siah French's land, approbated the same 
found among the papers of Maroellns day, had been designed to take its place. 
Chandler by James W. Patterson, who • These roads were the earliest ones in the 
rescued it for preservation. town that led either westward or eastward 

11 This was a primitive, slightly wrought from the river. " Joslah French's brook 
road, and led from its river terminus in the at the north side of his lot at the river," 
vicinity of the Mile Bock (near which there was the stream in the ravine which, a cen- 
was a ferry-landing) northwestwardly to- tnry later, was luiown as the Mansion 
ward Burnt hill, passing a portion of its House galley. 

way where Western Avenue now is. It 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP, 



121 



of said Hallowelli whose name was exhibited to the town, and who they sup- 
pose to be of a disposition inimical to the liberties and privileges of the said 
States. 

Oct. 25, 1777. Was chosen by ballot Mr. Edward Savage to procure evi- 
dence if required against any persons that may be voted inimical to the liber- 
ties and privileges of the United States. 

Voted not to reconsider the vote passed the 17th of July, 1777, relating to 
John Jones being Inimical to the privileges and the liberties of the United 
States. 

Oct. 25, 1777. Voted John Jones inimical again to the liberties and privileges 
of the United States. 

March 16, 1778. Election of town officers. Annual appropriations. 

Voted that George Brown, Edward Savage, Nathaniel Hearsey, Colonel 
William Howard, and Samuel Cony, be a committee of correspondence, safety 
and inspection for this year. 

March 25, 1778. Adjourned meeting. Voted and was chosen by written 
ballot for a committee of correspondence, safety and inspection for the pres- 
ent year : Colonel William Howard, Edward Savage, George Brown, Na- 
thaniel Hearsey and Lieut. Samuel Cony. 

April 6, 1778. It was unanimously voted that the form of government be 
approbated, which was laid before the town in order for their approbation or 
disapprobation. 

March 15, 1779. Annual town-meeting. Election of officers and appropri- 
ations for the year*s expenses. 

Voted that the selectmen do perambulate the roads A-om Jones' mill on the 
west side of the river to the lower end of the town ; and Arom the lower end 
of the town on the east side of the river up so far as Mr. Hearsej-'s land. 

Voted that the road Arom Isaac Savage's house down to the river to the 
proprietors' landing, so-called, be allowed to be approbated. 

Voted that Colonel William Howard, Mr. Samuel Cony and Mr. Bobert Ken- 
nady, be a committee of safety, correspondence and inspection for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Voted that any town-meetings be notified by posting up notifications, one at 
Fort Western, and one at Mr. Thomas', and one at Esq. Howard's grist-mill, 
and one at Mr. Pollard's and one at Mr. Wesson's [Weston's]. 

Oct. 30, 1779. Voted to choose a man as a delegate to meet the other dele- 
gates at Wiscasset Point, at a County Convention held there. 

Voted that Samuel Badcock, Senior, be a delegate to represent the state of 
this town, agreeable to directions sent to this town from Brig'r Charles Cush- 
ing in regard to the heavy taxes of the county. 

Voted to allow Mr. Samuel Badcock twenty-one dollars per day for the time 
that is necessarily employed doing said business. 

AddUional taxpayers, 1774. 



George 


Bolton, jr. 


David 


Emery, 


Robert 


Kennady, 


Alrijah 


Coy, 


Joseph 


Farley, 


Nathan 


Swetland, 


Joseph 
John 


Clongh, 
Dorr, 


Jason 
John 


Hallett, 
Hovey, 


(Illegible) 


Smith, 
Wright, 


Arthur 


TlTinn- 


WilUam 


HalloweU. 


Joshua 


Ward. 



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122 HISTORY or AUGUSTA. 

March 13, 1780. Annual town-meeting. Election of officers, and appropri- 
ations for expenses. 

Voted that Abisha Cowan, David Thomas and Robert Eennady, be a com- 
mittee of correspondence, safety and inspection for the ensning year. 

March 17, 1780. Voted that the town will raise money to hire men to serve 
in the service by way of rate, for the future. 

Voted that the men that have done most in the service, let it stand till others 
come equal. 

Voted that Benjamin Pettengill, Jeremiah Ingraham, Jonathan Davenport, 
Samuel Bullen and Robert Kennady, be a committee to estimate what each in- 
dividual person shall be allowed for the services they have done by going into 
the service for this town for the time past, &c., and also to examine and esti- 
mate the expense that individuals in this town have been at, either by personal 
service or any other ways in procuring soldiers to engage in the present war, 
since the public encouragement has been insufficient to encourage them to en- 
list voluntarily ; and also, if the town will raise a sum of money by an equal 
tax on the polls and estates sufficient to defray said expense and reimburse 
the same out of said tax to the persons who have done the service or been at 
the expense and to hire men for the tliture on the town's credit to go into the 
war, whenever they are required by the Continent or State ; and to hire them 
in the cheapest manner they can be procured ; provided they are able-bodied, 
effective men ; and said committee or committees to lay their accounts before 
the town in order for the money to be granted. Voted to allow the commis- 
sioned officers the same as the private soldiers. 

Voted to have the town road on the west side of the river approbated as 
followeth viz : as it was surveyed the 15th of May, 1779, beginning at Trout- 
brook or Jones* mill to the south line of the town, the courses are as follows 
[substantially those of the present Augusta and Farmingdale highway]. 

May 6, 1780. Voted to give each private soldier, or non-commissioned offi- 
cer, two thousand and one half of Mer. pine boards, that does go into the 
State or Continental service, and for the town to have the State or Continental 
bounty and wages in lieu thereof. 

It was unanimously voted, that the Constitution or Form of Government^* 
be approved, to the amount of twenty-flve voters. 

June 15, 1780. Voted to send an agent to meet in convention at the house 
of Mr. Whittier's at Wiscasset the 20th instant to proportion the abatements 
in our taxes in the several towns in the county. Voted that Daniel Savage 
be the delegate. 

October 2, 1780. Voted to allow the soldiers that went into the service 
for three months to serve at Camden for the town, &c., five hundred dollars 
to each man. 
Voted that there shall be twelve thousands pounds raised to pay our soi- 
ls This was the oonstitntion of the new June 14, and went into operation Oct. 25, 
State of Massachusetts, which was adopted 1780. 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 123 

diers that went into the service of the State to serve for the space of eight 
months at Camden '' for this town*s quota of men. 

December 15, 1780. Voted that there be live thousand pounds raised for 
to procure the quantity of beef which is laid upon this town, which is 32C0 
weight. 

January 19, 1781. Voted to raise ninety guineas to raise six men to go in- 
to the service of the State of Massachusetts. 

Voted that the selectmen and commissioned officers shall do their endeavors 
to procure said men. 

Voted that the said selectmen and officers hire money upon the town's credit 
to procure said men. 

January 27, 1781. A<Uoumed meeting. 

Voted to give in addition to the fifteen guineas to each man that would en- 
gage to serve for three years or during the war. to make it up to one hundred 
dollars hard money or the value thereof. 

Febaary 12, 1781. Voted to choose a committee to meet the committees 
of the neighboring towns. 

Voted that Ephrain Ballard, Daniel Savage, and Captain James Cocks, be 
a committee to petition the General Court for relief of the beef tax, and oar 
quota of soldiers sent for A-om this town. 

Voted that said committee act in conjunction with the other committees 
Arom the neighboring towns if they think proper. 

March 12, 1781. Fort Western. Annual meeting. Voted to allow Ben- 
jamin Fettenglll, Esq., Jeremiah Ingraham, Jonathan Davenport, Robert Ken- 
nady, and Samuel Bullen, the sum of two hundred and forty pounds for their 
time and expense in raising men to go to Camden in the yeai* 1780. 

Voted that the commissioned officers with the present selectmen shall have 
discretionary power to get the continental men in the best way and manner 
they can be procured. / 

September 6, 1781. Voted that the selectmen shall endeavor to procure 
this town's quota of shirts, stockings and shoes and blankets required of this 
town, upon the town's credit if they can be procured. 

Voted that Colonel William Howard shall send up the new emission money 
that he has got in rates to the treasurer, in order to draw the interest, and 
likewise to send for the men's wages for their services at Camden. 

Voted that the town make good to Colonel Howard in money or lumber in 
the same manner they do the soldiers that served at Camden last year. 

^ After the disastroas Fenobecot or Bag- Kennebec and on the outlying islands, 

adnce campaign of 1779, General Peleg British foraging parties from the Fenob- 

Wadsworth of Doxbury, was given the scot, enconraged and piloted by resident 

command of the eastern military depart- tories, infested the region. General Wads- 

ment of the continental army, which ex- worth was empowered to raise a battalion 

tended between the Piscataqaa and St. of volunteers in Lincoln ooanty, which he 

Croix rivers. He entered upon his duties succeeded in doing, enlisting the men for 

in April, 1780, establishing his headquarters eight months, several of whom were fur- 

at Thomaston. He had authority to exe- nished by the town of Hallowell. General 

cute martial law within a strip of territory Wadsworth's principal force was stationed 

ten miles wide along the coast east of the at Megnnticook or Camden harbor. 



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124 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

Voted that the town make good to every person that has any demands 
against the town in the same manner that they pay Colonel Howard, and the 
soldiers that served at Camden the year past. 

Voted that there be forty-flve pounds to pay the soldiers that served at 
Camden if wanted ; and if not to be put to other uses for the town. 

Voted to choose a committee to hire men to supply the continental army. 
Voted that Colonel Joseph North, Captain Enoch Page, and David Clark be 
the committee to procure said men. Voted that the committee do agree with 
the men by the year, if they continue In the service. 

Jan. 7, 1782. A4}oui*ned meeting. It was voted to petition the General 
Court in regard to our Continental soldiers, and other of our difficult circum- 
stances. Voted to choose a committee In order to draw a petition to send to 
the General Court. Voted that the selectmen be a committee to send said pe* 
tition to the General Court, signed by them In behalf of the town. 

March 11, 1782. Annual meeting. At Mr. Ellas Craig's. Officers chosen. 
Voted to have all the eight rod roads In the town laid common, according to 
the Plymouth Company's plans. 

Voted to have the road laid open that Is between Colonel North and Asa 
Emerson immediately. 

March 12, 1782. The town approbated a road Arom Vassalborough [now 
Sidney] to Trout brook, near the mills, that Is below the' mills that were built 
by John Jones on the west side of the river [courses and distances given]. 
Another road on the west side of the river was approbated, beginning at the 
public road on the bank of the river, about half a mile to the northward of 
Bombay-hook [now called Vaughan brook], viz : about four or five rods north 
of the northeast comer of the farm [on] which Deacon Clark formerly dwelt, 
thence [locating the present Academy and High Streets, and a portion of the 
present Manchester road]. 

April 1, 1782. 

Voted for his Excellency John Hancock, Esq., for Governor." Voters 
twenty-three. 

Voted for a senator, viz : The Hon. Thomas Rice, unanimously voted for by 
twenty-three votes. 

Voted for Thomas Cushing, Esq., for Lieut. Governor, sixteen voters. 

Voted for Samuel Adams for ditto, six voters. 

April 7, 1783. Met at the meeting-house and adjourned to Fort Western. 
Voted for Major William Llthgow for senator for the county of Lincoln, 
twenty-two votes. 

Voted for Benjamin Lincoln, Esq., for Govemor-in-Chief. Voted for Thomas 
Cushing, Esq., for Lieut. Governor. The number of votes for Governor and 
Lieutenant-Governor is twenty-one votes each. 

May 5, 1788. Voted that they would not send a man to represent this town 
at the Great and General Court to be holden at Boston the present year. 

July 31, 1783. Voted for a Governor, viz: fifteen votes for James Bowdoin 

14 The qnaliflcation of voters for governor or any estate to the valne of £60, and resi- 

and other state officers then was : twenty- denoe in the town for the space of one year 

one years of age and upward, having a next preceding the day of election, 
freehold estate of the annual income of £3, 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 125 

Esq., and seven for his honor John Hancocki Esq., and ten for Bei^amin Lin- 
coln, Esq. Voted for Lieutenant-Governor, thirty-two votes for Thomas 
Gushing, Esq., and for Senator, forty-one votes for William Lithgow, Jun., 
Esq. 

March 9, 1784. Voted that the town treasurer do make the best he can of 
the paper money collected for rates, and sent back to this town from Boston 
again. 

Voted to accept of the road Arom Mr. Amos Pollard's south line of his land 
where he lives down to Mr. Prescott's mill-brook, so called. 

May 5, 1784. Voted not to send a man to represent the town at the Great 
and General Court to be held at Boston on the last Wednesday of May, instant. 

March 15, 1785. Annual meeting. Minutes of an eight-rod road between 
lots No. 7 and 8, in the town of Hallowell, on the west side of Kennebeck 
river, laid out March 12, 1785, by us the subscribers ; beginning at the east 
end of the north line of lot No. seven; thence running west northwest on 
said liite for the southerly line or bound of said road ; being about two or three 
feet south of Mr. Pollard's new house ; and so by sundry marks and stakes up 
to the top of the hill called Burnt hill to a dead pine tree marked, and sundry 
stakes and marks, eight rods to the northward for the northerly bound of said 
road. [Signed] Ephraim Ballard, Joseph North, William Brooks, The town 
voted to accept the above minutes,^^ 

Voted to choose Messrs. Abisha Cowan, Isaac Clark and Samuel Comings 
as a committee for the west side of the river; and Messrs. Jonathan Daven- 
port, Daniel Cony and Jeremiah Ingraham for the east side, for the purpose 
of procuring a piece of land or pieces of land wUere the town will think pro- 
per, in order for a burying place or places for the town, and make report. 

May 11, 1785. Voted and chose Joseph North a representative to the Gen- 
eral Court.' 

July 7, 1785. Voted to choose a committee in behalf of this town to Join 
with Pownalborough and the other towns in this county for to petition the 
General Court, praying that the Supreme Judicial Court may he held in the 
county of Lincoln. 

November 29, 1785. Voted to send a delegate to convene and meet in con- 
vention at Falmouth on the first Wednesday of January next. Voted and 
chose by written ballot Daniel Cony for said delegate. 

December 26, 1785. Resolved, (1) that it is the sense of this meeting, that our 
delegate to Falmouth shall receive our instructions, and shall strictly re- 
gulate his conduct according to such resolutions as shall be now agreed upon. 
(2) That we earnestly wish to maintain and cultivate peace and harmony with 
our brethren, and therefore that our delegate be directed to make a particular 
enquiry how the general pulse of the people beats, with respect to a new 
State, and to oppose every measure that has not their unanimous concurrence 
if it is agreeable to his sentiments. (3) That though the people in general 
should approve the idea of a New State, yet, if there should be any reason to 
suppose that our separation will create any reasonable Jealousies, or save any 
discord amongst our brethen, or that it may threaten to benefit one part of the 

16 This was the first action of the town in the laying out of Winthrop street. 



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126 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



present State to the great prejudice of the other, that he be directed to oppose 
any such separation. (4) That though none of the above objections should 
arise against the formation of these three counties [York, Cumberland, Lin- 
coln,] into a separate State, yet, that the measure shall be opposed unless we 
proceed upon the principle of still continuing a part of the Federal Union. 
(6) That we are determined to act like men of honor, and therefore that we 
shall still consider ourselves as solemnly bound to continue to pay our fdll 
proportion agreeable to the present valuation toward the discharge of the 
general debts of the Continent, until the whole of it is paid off. [Signed] 
Noah Woodward, Chairman ; Enoch Page, Samuel Dutton, Ephraln Ballard, 
Lazarus Goodwin, Committee. 

March 6, 1786. Voted that every person or tree man, that is an inhabitant 
of the town, and is actually worth twenty-pounds rateable estate, may and 
shall have a vote, or a right to vote, in this town meeting. 

Voted by written ballot and chose Daniel Cony a delegate to Falmouth by 
a majority of forty-three /or, to thirty-one against, ^ 

March 7, 1786. The committee chosen last year [Abisha Cowan, Isaac Clark, 
and Samuel Comings] to look out and procure burying places, report as fol- 
loweth, viz : That Mr. Abisha Cowan will give to the town half an acre of land 
for a burying-yard, bounded as foUoweth : Beginning at the town road on the 
west side of the road, and on the southerly side of said Cowan's land ; thence 
running west northwest, ten rods; then northerly eight rods; thence east 
southeast ten rods to the road ; thence southerly by the road to the first bound. 
[Signed] Isaac Clark, Abisha Cowan, Committee. 

Also the committee report that Mr. Samuel Comings will give the following 
described piece of land to the town for a burying-yard ; bounded as folio weth. 
Viz : Beginning at the county road that leads from Hallowell to Wlpthrop, and 
on Mr. Coming's land about twenty rods to the west of a causeway called 
Comings' Causeway, at a hemlock stump on the second ridge or knoll the south 
side of the road; thence running eight rods south; then west six rods; then 
north eight rods ; then east six rods to the first bound. [Signed] Isaac Clark, 
Samuel Comings, Committee. 

Voted that the town do accept of the above described pieces of land of Mr. 
Cowan and Mr. Comings, and that the selectmen be desired to take deeds in 
behalf of the town for the same. 

The committee report that Colonel Howard says that he is willing that any 
people may bury at the burying-place on his land, but don't incline to give any 
title to the land. [Signed] Jonathan Davenport, Daniel Savage, Jeremiah In- 
graham. 

Voted to accept of the above report. 

January 8, 1787. On an article in the warrant, to hear the proceedings of 
the committee held at Portland in September last, *'to consider of the griev- 











George Brown, 


Simeon 


Paine, 


Paul 


Sears, 


Frederick O.Bluskee, 


Joel 


Richardson, 


Thomas 


Sewall, 


Bartholomew Harding, 


Michael 


Rearden, 


Nathaniel 


Tyler, 


John Lee, 


Levi 


Robinson, 


Moses 


White. 


John McMaster. 


EUab 


Shaw. 







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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 127 

ances which the conntles of York, Cumberland and Lincoln labor under/* and 
act thereon, voted by polling the houde, and thirty-six for a separation, and 
three against it. Also voted that Daniel Cony, our delegate, be instructed to 
parsne to the utmost of his abilities, such further measures in behalf of this 
town, as shall be considered necessary to obtain a separation. 

May 7, 1787. Voted that the arrearages of town taxes assessed previous to 
the year 1786, may be collected in lumber at the current money price, and to 
be delivered to the town treasurer ; he to dispose of the same to the best ad- 
vantage. 

November 7, 1787. On motion made, the Federal Constitution with the 
several resolves accompanying it were read in meeting, also the arguments of 
several writers for and against the said Federal Constitution. The vote being 
put to choose a delegate, there were sixty-two for Captain James Carr, 
eighteen for Mr. Brown Emerson, and three for Captain Henry Sewall. 

April 5, 1788. Voted that fifteen pounds be raised for the purpose of pro- 
curing the proportion of gunpowder, leaden balls and flints, required by law 
to be kept in town stock. 

Voted to build one pound on the west side of the river in the road leading 
to Winthrop, upon a knoll near the meettng-house ; and another on the east 
side the river, as near as may be convenient to George Brown's. And the 
selectmen be a coimnlttee to execute the same. 

September 9, 1788. Voted to allow Mr. Benjamin White £4 16s. towards 
the Province tax for the year 1773, which he collected in paper money, and it 
depreciated to almost nothing in his hands. 

October 30, 1788. Voted to build the pounds with round logs or poles ; and 
to be thirty feet square within side; and Mr. James Page, and Benjamin Pet- 
tengill, Esq., were chosen a committee to procure the stuff the winter en- 
suing. 

Voted to choose a committee of three to procure timber for the bridge by 
Colonel Howard's mill; and Mr. Brian Fletcher, Jr., Mr. Daniel Savage, and 
Mr. Phineas Allen were chosen for said committee. 

Voted, and granted ten pounds for the piirpose of paying a fine laid on the 
town, for not keeping in repair the road which leads from the Hook to Win- 
throp, and the cost of prosecution. 

May 2, 1791. Bespecting separation from Massachusetts, voted and chose 
a committee to take the subject in consideration, and report at the next town 
meeting, viz : Joseph North, William Litbgow, Jr., Daniel Cony, Nathaniel 
Dummer, and Henry Sewall, Esquires. 

May 13, 1791. Upon the article of the separation of the District of Maine 
from Massachusetts, the report of the committee appointed for the purpose 
being read, the yeas and nays of the house present were taken thereon by 
polling the house, and there appeared fifty for the report and twenty against 
it ; so it was accepted, and is as follows : Voted, that it is the opinion of this 



Additional taxpayers ^ 1776, 
Edward Bolton, 
Savage Bolton, 

Jeremiah Badcodc. 



John Carlow, I William Trask. 

AmoB Pa^e, 

Etenezer Thomas. I 



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128 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

town, that many and great adv^antages may be deriTed to the good people of 
the District of Maine from its being formed into a separate Government ; and 
that sach separation ought to take place as soon as conveniently may be ; but 
as the sentiments of the people on a subject of so much importance, can better 
be collected in a District Convention, to be formed of Delegates Arom the sev- 
eral towns and plantations in the said District than in any other way : we 
therefore request the Senator of the County of Lincoln, and instruct the re- 
presentative [Daniel Cony] of this town to use their best endeavors that such 
convention may be authorized by a legislative act, the business of which con- 
vention shall be to consider the expediency of the above-mentioned separation; 
and if it shall be judged expedient, that said convention proceed to frame a 
Constitution for the fhture government of the said District, and report their 
doings In these respects, to the several towns and plantations for their appro- 
bation or disapprobation. 

May 7, 179S. Voted that the money assessed on the lands of the non-resident 
proprietors for the repair of the highways in this town the present year, be 
appropriated to the repair of the highways on the west side of the river, viz: 
the road leading from the meeting-house to Winthrop, and the road leading 
from the Hook to Winthrop, in equal moieties, on each of said roads. 

Voted to excuse Jeremiah Ingraham, on account of his age and infirmity, 
from serving in the office of tythingman, and chose RolArt Denison in his 
room.*' 

May 7, 1792. A meeting in the Court-house of the male inhabitants of the 
town of Hallo well, twenty-one years of age, for the purpose of giving in their 
votes on the proposed separation of the District of Maine from the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, having been duly notified pursuant to a resolve of 
the General Court for that purpose ; the house being divided on the question, 
and carefully counted, there appeared for the proposed separation fifty-six, 
and agranstit fifty-two. Eleven other persons, inhabitants of the District of 
Maine, but not of this town, who were occasionally present at the meeting, 
being permitted by a vote of the town, declared themselveti severally to be 
for the said separation. 

January 14, 1793. Voted to dismiss the article respecting inoculation for the 

M Tythingmen were ofiioerB of conBider- which they oould oonsdentiously and con- 
able importanoe. The statute of 8th March, venientl j attend ; (5) It was made the duty 
1792, provided for the most decorous ohser- of tythingmen to inquire into and inform 
vance of the Lord's day, (1) by forbidding of all offences against the act; they were 
all labor, business, and work (of necessity anthorized to enter any room of a tavern, 
and charity only excepted), and any sport, and also to examine all persons whom they 
game, play or recreation ; (2) prohibiting should have good cause to suspect of nn- 
trayelling, except from necessity or charity; necessarily travelling, and to demand of 
(3) tavern-keepers were forbidden to enter- such persons the cause thereof, together 
tain any persons, not being travellers, with their names and places of abode ; if 
strangers or lodgers, in their houses ; (4) the reason given was not satisfactory, they 
persons should not absent themselves from were to enter a complaint against the trav- 
public worship, unless necessarily prevent- eller before a justice of the peace in the 
ed, for the space of three months together, county where the offence was committed, 
provided there was any place of worship at if the offender lived in the county', other- 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 129 

small pox ("under the superintendence of Doctor Colman and subject to the 
rules and regulations prescribed by a late law of the Commonwealth in such 
case made and provided") . 

April 1, 1793. Voted to accept of a road to the settlement called New 
France. 

May 6, 1793. Voted to erect a pound at the Hoolc, near John Couch*s on 
the road leading to Winthrop; and that Samuel Norcross» Shubael Hlnkley 
and James Carr, be a committee to superintend the building of it. 

November 4, 1793. In the meeting-house, there being but a thin attendance 
on account of stormy weather, voted to adjourn this meeting to the 16th day 
of December, then to be held at the court-house. 

December 16, 1793. Voted and chose by ballot unanimously (86 votes), 
Daniel Cony, Esq., a delegate to represent the town in the convention to be 
held in the Court-house in Portland the last Tuesday of December, instant, to 
take the matter of separation into consideration, and to lay the result of their 
deliberations before their constituents. Voted that the town wil^ allow the 
delegate to said convention a reasonable compensation, for travel and attend- 
ance. 

May 5, 1794. Voted and chose Nathaniel Dummer, Esq.,*^ a delegate to the 
convention to be held at Portland the third Wednesday of June next. 

February 12, 1795, Voted that Ephraim Ballard's report of the survey of a 
road firom Cumming's mill to the Winthrop road be accepted. 

March 16, 1795. After a considerable debate on the question respecting the 
qualifications of voters, and no decision being had, it was superseded by a 
motion for acUournment. And the meeting was adjourned to Monday, the 2dd 
instant, at nine of the clock in the morning, then to meet in the Academy at 
the Hook. 

March 23, 1795. The freeholders and other inhabitants of the town of Hal- 
lowell met at the Academy according to the last adjournment, Daniel Cony, 
moderator. The meeting being purged*by the moderator agreeable to a list of 
voters produced by the assessors, it was voted to reconsider the vote which 
passed at this meeting the 16th instant, respecting five selectmen, and that 
there be but three selectmen the present year. Voted and chose : Matthew 
Hayward, Ellas Craig, and Joseph Smith, selectmen and assessors. The 
meeting was then acyourned to the first Monday in April next, at ten of the 
clock in the forenoon, then to meet at the meeting-house in this town. 

April 6, 1795. Convened In the meeting-house according to a^ournment 
Then proceeded in the election of town officers. 

wise they were to give information to some ^^ Nathaniel Dnmmer served as the Sec- 
grand juryman. In the early part of the retary of the Convention, which merely 
19th century it was not nnnsual for persons issned an address to the inhabitants, eam- 
while travelling in Angusta on Sandays to estly reqoesting their interest in the subject 
he rigorously held up and catechised by of separatioa, and then adjourned to the 
watchful tythlngmen, who ooald not be ac- second Tuesday of Octobar following; but 
ensdd of backwardness in exercising the it never assembled again for the transaction 
authority of their office. of business. 

9 



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130 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 

May 6, 1795. Under the article respecting a revision of the Constitution,^^ 
the yeas and nays being called for by the selectmen, there appeared ninety for 
it and none against it. 

March 21, 1796. Voted and chose Chandler Bobbins, David Sewall, and 
John Sheppard a committee to erect a pound in the Hook settlement. Voted 
and chose Theophilns Hamlen, Amos Partridge and James Child to erect a 
pound in the Fort Western settlement. 

April 4, 1796. Voted for Governor. For his Excellency Samuel Adams, 
Esquire, one hundred and fifteen (115). Hon. Increase Sumner, Esq., twenty- 
two (22). 

May 12, 1796. Voted that the consideration of the second article in the 
warrant (to see if the town will agree to petition the General Court for a di- 
vision of the town of Hallowell into two towns) be referred to the next an- 
nual town meeting. 

May 12, 1796. The selectmen having received a circular letter ft'om a com- 
mittee in behalf of the Memorialists in Boston, with certain papers relating 
to the Treaty " lately concluded between the United States and Great Britain, 
and laid the same before the town, the same were referred to a committee of 
nine, who reported the following vote, viz : Voted that Ikis town feel deeply 
impressed with the importance of having the Treaty, lately concluded between 
the United States and Great Britain, carried into effect, and in order thereto, 
that it ought fairly and honorably to be executed on the part of the United 
States : We therefore esteem It a duty we owe ourselves, and our Country to 
express an unequivocal opinion on this occasion ; and it is our earnest wish, 
that Congress, or rather the House of Representatives, may no longer hesitate 
or delay to make the necessary provision for that purpose. Voted that the 
town clerk be directed to tmnsmlt without delay a certified copy of these pro- 
ceedings to the Representative in Congress from this DLstrict [Henry Dear- 
born], and that a duplicate be also transmitted to the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee in behalf of the Memorialists gf Boston, on the British Treaty. 

November 7, 1796. Voted that In consequence of the notification ftrom the 
General Court, relative to a division of this town, there be a committee of 
nine appointed to take the subject at large under consideration, and report 
their opinion respecting the same, at the next annual meeting ; and that Na- 
thaniel Dummer, Esq., William Dorr, Amos Stoddard and Benjamin Poor, of 
the South Parish ; William Howard, Samuel Stevens and Moses Carr, of the 
Middle Parish ; and George Read and Jeremiah Badcock of the North Parish, 
be the said committee. Voted that Amos Stoddard, Esq., our Representative, 
communicate the proceedings of this meeting to the General Court, and re- 
quest that Honorable Body, that the division of the town may be deferred 
until the town may have an opportunity to agree thereon. 

The seventh of November, 1796, was the last date on which 
a meeting for the transaction of town businesa was held in an- 

18 The State Constitntion. States and Great Britain, which was signed 

19 Thip was the treaty of amity, com- at London by the Earl of Grenville and 
merce and navigation, between the United John Jay, on the 19th of November, 1794. 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 131 

cient Hallo well. After twenty-six eventful yeara the town had 
so increased in population and industry and political stature, as 
to have outgrown some of the conditions which existed at the 
early time of its incorporation. There was a convergence of 
people and business at two points, making two villages of near- 
ly equal size, and near enough neighbors to be either loving 
sisters or querulous rivals. Each community was evenly matched 
by forceful men of culture, sagacity and enterprise, whose per- 
sonal interests and local pride together made them strenuous 
partisans of their respective localities. The Hook village had 
the Academy and a meeting-house ; the Fort village had a meet- 
ing-house and couit-houso and jail. There were ferries at both 
places. The public honoi*s so far as there were any had been 
fairly divided ; but there arose among the easily discontented 
in the Hook community a spirit of jealousy which readily found 
in the interchange of amenities between the two sections of the 
town plenty of real or imaginary food to feed upon. The first 
overt public demonstmtion expressive of that feeling occurred 
on the 16th of March, 1795, when the consolidated voters of 
the southerly part of the town, finding themselves accidentally 
in majority in town meeting, forced an adjournment of the 
meeting to the Academy building at the Hook. This maneuver 
was spiritedly resented by the voters of the middle and north 
parishes, who rallied in force at the Academy and summarily 
adjourned the meeting back to the meeting-house. Daniel Cony 
of the upper village, was the moderator of the meeting, and 
some of his official rulings while unquestionably candid and 
correct tended to still further intensify the sectional jealousy of 
the minority. An irrepressible town quarrel was now on which 
the two little neighboring newspapers valiently promoted by 
extravagantly decrying the natural advantages of each other's 
pet village, and ruffling the somewhat obtrusive vanity of Daniel 
Cony on the one side and the pride and self-complacency of the 
Hook people on the other. 

Additional taxpay&ra^ 1777. 

Jonaa Dntton, I Jonathan Phil brook, I Samnel White, 

David Hatch, James Springer, WiUiam WUkins. 

Stephen Norton, | Benjamin White, jr., 



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132 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

Under the caption of «* Arrivals at Fort Western since our 
last," the Kennebec Intelligencer of April 26, 1796, printed a 
list of fifteen vessels, giving their tonnage and the names of 
their masters. The announcement prompted an editorial in The 
Tocsin at the Hook of May 3d, following. 

We see in the Intelligencer^ a paper printed at a village two miles and a half 
above this place, a pompous account of the arrival of shipping at Fort Wes- 
tern, which is a village which derives Its name ft'om a block-house that is still 
standing and makes a respectable part of the settlement. Had It been a thing 
uncommon or worthy of public notice we might have given our readers earlier 
Information that those vessels named and many others all safely arrived at this 
port from sea ; and this week we might have added, that being favored with a 
fteshet which brought the waters sis feet above high water mark, part of the 
fleet seized the opportunity of a strong southerly wind and run their hazard 
to Fort Western. 

Considering that many gentlemen abroad may have their interest concerned 
in such desperate navigation, we think it a duty to Inform them that the larger 
vessels have prudently fallen down without their lading to this port, and al- 
though they got aground, we are happy to add no material damage occurred — 
doubtless the rest will take Into consideration the propriety of hastening their 
departure for the Hook. 

N. B. Those who may have concern for the ships of seventeen tons there 
mentioned may feel easy, for if the fk'eshet should fkll the navigation will be 
as usual — the men get out and push such vessels over the shoals. 

The next issue of the Intelligencer printed a communication 
in reply to The Tocsin's editorial, in which the writer said : 

Hearing a few discordant vibrations firom the '^ Alarm Bell" alias The Toe, 
sin, last week, on the arrival of fifteen vessels at Fort Western, In two days, 
and in order to give it an opportunity once more to chime If possible with 
greater harmony, we announce the safe arrival the last week of the following 
vessels [a list of twelve]. We are happy to add that Captain Dean and How- 
land, who were here last summer seven or eight times apiece, and loaded their 
vessels, which drew from seven and three-fourths to eight feet of water each 
time, have this spring loaded at and departed ftom this port with their usual 
draft — since the full of the flreshet — notwithstanding a few oery fionest men 
have deposed that there was only seven feet in the best water on the shoals. 
We learn the ship Betsy *^ of 817 tons, drawing about nine feet water, which 
was launched at this place a few days since, unfortunately struck on the 
shoalen-ground between Fort Western and the entrance of the Kennebec; but 
are happy to add, through the Mendly exertions of the editors of The Tocsin, 

30 The Bhoal on which the Betsy groxind' from that place [Fort Western] . Bomboo- 

ed was described in The Tocsin as : " A bar hook is the place where the merchants at 

between Bomboohook and a small village Fort Western and others situated above 

about a mile above, which derives its name them osaaliy load their large coasters.'* 



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HALLOWELL A TOWNSHIP. 133 

she was fortnnately '*ptt»hed over the shoals,** and received no material injury. 
TVe hope they will render the same friendly assistance should the Montezuma 
of 300 tons, which will be launched on Wednesday next by Messrs. Howards 
meet the like accident. We, however, congratulate the public on the fair 
prospect of this bar — which is an obstruction to the navigation of large ves- 
sels to Fort Western, the head of navigation, -^being shortly removed, as we 
understand a subscription for that purpose is on foot, and will doubtless be 
accomplished next summer ; as also the Kennebec bridge will in all probability 
be erected at that time. These important objects, when accomplished, must 
at once decide on the decline of the increasing importance of the Hook village 
below. We, however, condole with the founder of the buildings at that place, 
viz., the brewery and juniper berry distillery, but believe, while the country 
is congenial to the growth of spruce, the seasons favorable to the production 
of juniper berries, his exertions will meet with that recompense which he has 
heretofore experienced. 

We agree with the editors of The Tocsin that the passage of fifteen or 
twenty vessels for Fort Western in a week, **was not worthy of notice to his 
readers," while they did not think proper to stop at their village. We learn 
that one vessel dropped anchor the last week at the Hook village, and finding 
no purchasers for her cargo, and that nothing could be obtained at that place 
but spruce beer and the spirits of juniper berries, immediately weighed anchor 
and proceeded to Fort Western, where she is now nearly loaded with fish and 
lamber. 

The two parts of the town had drifted into a state of hopeless 
incompatibility for which political divorce was the only obvious 
remedy. The Hook, however, did not wish for a separation, 
but was unable to prevent it after the Fort party determined it. 
The latter beside being the most numerous was the better led 
by a larger coterie of able men well versed in public affairs, — 
among whom towered Daniel Cony, a man then without a peer 
on the Kennebec in legislative experience and personal influence 
at Boston. He had lobbeyed through the legislature the charter 
for a bridge across the river at the village of Fort Western, and 
interested enough Boston capitalists to ensure the speedy build- 
ing of it. The location of the bridge having established the 
permanency of the upper village and given it great prospective 
advantage over its vigorous rival, the clear-sighted leaders who 
lived in the region of the fort were ready to advocate boldly 

AddUUmal taxpayers f 1776. 

Ephraim Ballard, I John Church, I Ebenezer Littlefield, 

Samuel Cony, Solomon Cummings, 1 Amos Pollard, 

Samnel Cony, jr., | Beriah Ingraham. | Benjamin Smith. 



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134 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

the division of the town, i*egardless of the feelings and protest 
of their fellow-citizens at the Hook. 

The question of division was brought before a town meeting 
held on the 12th day oj May, 179G, ''by request often free- 
holders," viz., Joseph North, Matthew Hay ward, Stately 
Springer, James Burton, James Bridge, Elias Craig, Gershom 
North, Theophilus Hamlen, John Springer, and George Crosby, 
all of the northern half of the town, and favorers of the propo- 
sition. The voters of the South parish attended in force and 
appear to have been in the majority as the subject was referred 
to the then " next annual town meeting." 

Defeated in town meeting, but in no degree discouraged, the 
fort citizens petitioned the General Court for a division of the 
town ; and an advertisement in the Kennebec Intelligencer of 
May 20th, requested the subscribers to the petition to meet at 
the Couil-house on the following Monday for conference. The 
meeting was held, and "Daniel Cony was appointed agent to 
prefer the petition to the General Court during its then session." 
That gentleman performed the duty assigned him by his fellow- 
citizens with his accustomed eflSciency and success. 



AddUi<mal taxpayerBy 1779. 








Fhineas Allen, 


Samnel 


Cnmmlngs, 


Sheiebiah 


Town, 


Benjamin Gotten, 


Thomas 


Poor, 


Seth 


Williama, 


Daniel Cony. 


Ephraim 


Town. 


A8a 


WiUiama. 



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CHAPTER VI. 
THE RELIGIOUS ANNALS OF HALLOWELL. 



The gospel of Christianity was first proclaimed on the Ken- 
nebec by the reverend Father Druillettes, a Catholic mission- 
ary of transcendent valor, fortitude and pastoral ability, whom 
the French hierarchy sent forth from Quebec in the early au- 
tumn of 1646, to visit and evangelize the Indian tribes of Wes- 
tern Acadia — ^the appellation then vaguely extended by French- 
men to the country which now constitutes the easterly two- 
thirds of the territory of Maine. 

Gabriel Draillettes was born in France in the year 1693. Having en- 
tered the Society of Jesus, he solicited a foreign mission, and was sent 
in 1643, to Canada. He embarked at Rochelle on the 8th day of May with 
Garreau and Chabanel, both of whom lost their lives amid their Apostalic labors 
in the new world. Druillettes was immediately destined to the Algonquins 
and applied himself to the stndy of that wide-spread language. His labors 
began as soon as he was able to make himself nnderstood, and in 1644 he win- 
tered with a party of wandering Indians on the St. Lawrence. The torment 
caused by the smoke of an Indian cabin, was such as to almost exceed endur- 
ance. Father Druillettes was more severely tried than many of his prede- 
cessors; his eyesight gradually failed, and he became at last entirely blind. 
Hundreds of leagues of snow and ice, of mountain and forest, cut him off from 
the French posts, and the well-meant but clumsy attempts of the Indians to 
restore his sight, made his blindness appear incurable. He was now led about 
by a child, and it was even proposed to tie him on a sledge and haul him to 
Quebec. He scorned this, and advised a recourse to God by prayer. All in 
the vicinity were invited to assemble for the purpose -, by their help he ar- 



Additional taxpayera, 1 780. 



Benjamin 


Branch, 


John 


Dotty, 


Phillip 


Samuel 


Branch, 


Ichabod 


Dotty, 
Fairfield, 


Timothy 


WUliam 


Blake, 


Daniel 


Eliphalet 


Joseph 


Baker, 


Daniel 


Fisher, 


John 


John 


Badcock, 


David 


Gilman, 


Daniel 


Ellas 


Craig, 


Isaac 


Harding, 


Edward 


George 


Conch, 


Samuel 


Hussey, 


Gideon 


Samuel H. 


Cole, 


Jeremiah 


Ingraham, 


WUUam 


Robert 


Dennison, 


Samuel 


Mason, 




Joseph 


Dennifion. 


Samuel 


Norcross. 





Norcross, 

Page, 

Pierce, 

Shaw, jr., 

Stevens, 

Springer, 

Wing, 

Wing, 



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136 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

ranged his chapel farnitare, and began a votive Mass in honor of the Blessed 
Virgin. As he proceeded with the Holy Sacrifice, his neophytes prayed with 
fervor, and when after the Consecration he elevated the sacred Host, his eyes 
were opened and he saw what he had adored in darkness. From that moment 
his eyesight never dimmed amid the smoke of the lodges, where he passed 
many a dreary winter 1 This wonderful cure, which he publicly ascribed to 
the faith of his neophytes, filled him with new conrage and confidence in the 
protection of the Almighty. After spending the next year (1645-6) at Sillery, 
near Quebec, he was sent to the Abnakis on the Kennebec. He set out ft'om 
Sillery on the 29th of Aug. 1646, and after suffering much privation and hard- 
ship, recompensed by an abundant spiritual harvest, returned on the I6th of 
June, 1647, and a few days after, a stranger to repose, set out as chaplain to a 
party marching against the Iroquois, in the present State of New York. In- 
deed, till his return to the Abnakis in 1650, we find him constantly engaged in 
his laborious duties at Sillery, with wandering parties on the upper St. Law- 
rence, or around Tadoussac, in almost constant peril of death by adventure or 
starvation. At the latter place, he in 1650, first preached to the Oumamioukls, 
or people of Antlcostl, and then proceeded to the country of the Oupapina- 
chiouk, who now for the first time invited the missionary to their villages. 
From September, 1650, to March, 1657, he was constantly with the Abnakis on 
the Kennebec river, except for a few days spent at Three Bivers, in June, 
1651, and at the time of his embassies in New England; for he was on two oc- 
casions sent to Boston as ambassador of the French, first in 1650, and the sec- 
ond time with Sieur Godefroy, in 1661. He was superior at Three Rivers in 
1655, but chosen the next year to found the Ottawa Mission on Lake Superior, 
he set out with his old fellow voyager, Garreau ; when that missionary was 
killed at Montreal (1656), Druillettes was left behind by the Ottawas, and re- 
turned for the last time to his beloved Abnakis on the Kennebec, who had 
adopted him as a chief. In 1661, he set out with Father Dablon for the Kris- 
tineaux Mission, and leaving Tadoussac in June, ascended the Sagnenay to 
the River Nekouba and Lake St. John. The approach of the Mohawks pre- 
vented his further progress, and after renewing the faith of his scattered flock, 
he returned fo Tadoussac, where we find him sent again, year after year, carry- 
ing the Cross through all the neighboring country. In 1666, he was at Three 
Rivers, Instructing the celebrated Marquette in Montagnais, but both were 
soon to labor on the Western Lakes. In 1669, he was at Sault Ste. Marie, on 
Lake Superior, and the latest Belations ten years later, speak of him as still 
laboring there, though broken with age and toll. He was, however, near the 
close of his long and useful career. Returning to Quebec, he died there on 
the 8th of April, 1681, universally regretted and revered by some as a saint. 
Few indeed, of the apostles of Canada were more frequently invoked. "The 
fact is," says Charlevoix, *'no missionary then labored with more fruit in Can- 
ada, because Heaven had made him powerful alike In work and word," and he 
like many others, relates wonderful Interpositions of Divine power, ascribed 
to the interest of Druillettes' prayers.* 

1 Not3 by John Gllmary Shea to Narrji- York Hist. Soc. Coll., 2d Series. Vol. 3, 
tive of DruUlette*8 Voyage, 1651. New Part I. 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 137 

The adventurous Father Gubriel found the untutored natives 
friendly and hospitable, and very tolerant and receptive of the 
new religion which he displayed before them in the allegorical 
and impressive ceremonies of the Catholic Church. 

He built with the help of his dusky neophytes on the eastern 
bank of the river about a league above the Plymouth trading- 
post ^ in the midst of an Indian village,^ a rustic chapel, in which 
he raised an altar for the reception and exhibition of the sacri- 
ficial emblems, and the celebration of the Mass. To this humble 
sanctuary he gave the name of the Mission of the Assumption. 
Here, forgetful of himself amid his great deprivations and 
hardships, he laboi*ed with more than eaithly zeal for the health 
of the bodies and the salvation of the souls of the squalid and 
benighted heathen of his wilderness fold. He seems to have 
won by his good works and ministry to an extraordinary degree 
the esteem and confidence of the mass of the tiibe — of all save 
the jugglers or sorcerers whose business his teachings had in- 
jured. The beneficent work of this mission was continuous for 
only a few months. In midwinter the tribe dispersed from its 
cantonment, and as usual at that season of the year migrated to 
the region of Moosehead lake for a more plentiful supply of 
food than the frozen river below afibrded. The missionary ac- 
companied it, and in the following spring set out on his return 
to Quebec. In the relations concerning Father Druillettes' sub- 
sequent visits to the Kennebec it is not recorded that the Mis- 
sion of the Assumption was ever revived ; and it was probably 
abandoned in 1647, and succeeded by another at the permanent 
village of Nanmntsouak (now Indian Old Point). 

The location of the ancient Mission of the Assumption fell 
within the limits of the later township of Hallowell and the 
present city of Augusta. It would be idle to attempt to iden- 
tify with precision the spot where it stood. The Relation (the 

SDe la Mission 1' Assumption an pays nsnally aooommodatod seven or eight fam- 

des Abnaqniois. Relation des Jesnites, Hies each, we think that there were abont 

1647. Chapitre X. Quebec edition, 1858. five hundred savages in the encampment, 

See translation in Appendix to this volume. including the women and the children.*' 

s The Relation says there were at the (Histoire des Abenakis, par L'Abbe J. A. 

place fifteen great lodges. "As such lodges Marault, p. 120, note.) 



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138 



HISTORY OF AUOUSTA. 



only record extant) says the chapel was built a leagae higher 
up the river than the English habitation. From the known lo- 
cation of the latter it is conclusive that the mission-house was 
somewhere on the expanse of intervale (about two hundred 
rods) which has been divided into the river ends of several 
farms in ward eight, of which the place called Gilley's point is 
the most northerly. It is probable that the humble temple was 
built within the radius of an arrow's flight from the present ad- 
joining fields of Dennis and Patrick Donovan and Joseph Nicho- 
las. The structure was slight and ephemeral and soon disap- 
peared in decay or in the flames ; and while it left no trace of 
itself on the face of the eaith its pious memory marks in his- 
tory the era when the light of the gospel first radiated on the 
Kennebec. 

The Rev. Jacob Bailey of Pownalboro, occasionally came to 
the Fort Western hamlet in the performance of his labors as a 
missionary and clerical visitor to the scattered people of his ex- 
tended parish ; his writings make mention of his visits here in 
1763, 1772, and 1774.^* The Howards were episcopalians like 
the Gardiners and Norths at Gardinerston and the Lithgows 
and McKechnies at Fort Halifax. The missionary was kindly 
welcomed and entertained by Captain Howard at the fort domi- 
cile in 1763, and later at the more commodious mansion called 



4 The Frontier Missionuy, pp. 338, 340, 
849. Jacob Bailey was bom in Rowley, 
Mass., in I73I; grad. Harr. Coll. 1765; 
died at Annapolis, Nova Scotia, in 1808. 
He was bom and bred a Congregationalist, 
and preached for a while as a minister of 
that denomination, bat finally entered the 
Episcopal communion ; he went to London 
where he was ordained deacon by Zachary, 
Bishop of Rochester, March 2, 1760, and 
fourteen days later as priest by the Bishop 
of Peterborough. On the 1st of July fol- 
lowing, having returned to his native land, 
he entered upon his labors as " Itinerant 
Missionary on the Eastem Frontier of 
Massachusetts Bay,'* living first in the bar- 
racks of Fort Shirley at Pownalborough 
(now Dresden). He conducted services 



where he could find room, generally in the 
court house (now standing), until St. John 
Church was built in 1770, the outlines of 
the foundations of which are yet visible by 
the highway about a mile east of the Ken- 
nebec river. Mr. Bailey was a loyalist, 
and grievously offended by his sentiments 
and influence the revolutionary patriots of 
that day. The last years of his pastorate 
at Pownalborough were full of trouble, and 
finally, in the summer of 1774, he hired a 
small vessel and with his wife and infant 
son sailed away to Halifax — ^never return- 
ing to his country. (See a sketch by Charles 
E. Allen, of Dresden, read before the Lin- 
coln County Historical Society, November 
13, 1895.) 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 



139 



the Great Hoase. On those occasions the worthy parson 
donned his churchly surplice and read or recited the devout 
lessons of the Litany to small and select roomfulls of edified 
disciples of the English Church. He dispensed baptism to such 
children of the faithful as were offered, and administered other 
canon rites according to the limited demands of the people. 

While the communicants were in liturgical unity and social 
affinity with the royal gubernatorial and official circles of the 
province — and therefore individually prominent in the back- 
woods community, — .they were numerically few and unable to 
proselyte, even if their zeal had prompted it,*for the local 
strengtheningof their denomination. The political chasm was 
widening between the whigs and the tories ; the plain and stal- 
wart settlers were fast espousing the cause of the patriots in 
opposition to the churchmen generally, including the Plymouth 
company. Rector Bailey was a vehement tory, very vocal on 
his pet subject of politics, and poorlj^ fit to be the bearer of the 
gospel to a generation of rugged New Englanders in the early 
throes of a righteous revolution ; consequently his work made 
little impression on the religious and ecclesiastical life of the 
town. 

The religious policy of the puritans survived in a modified 
fonn both on the statue-book and in common practice long after 
the time of the incorporation of Hallo well, and a trace of it lin- 
gers in the parish laws even to this day. It was the duty of 
towns to provide facilities for their inhabitants to worship God, 
and ministers like school-teachers and other public employees 
were paid their scanty wages from the town treasury. 



Additional taxpayers, 1781 


Jeremiah 


Allen, 


Jonathan 


Butterfleld, 


John 


Beeman, 


Sanrnel 


Boyd, 


Ezekiel 


Chase, jr., 


Moses 


Cass, 


Enoch 


Craig, 


Jesse 


Craig, 


Benjamin 


Davis, 


Calvin 


Edson, 


Brian 


Fletcher, 


David 


Fletcher, 


Joseph 


Fletcher. 



Robert 


Fletcher, 


Andrew 


Goodwin, 


Isaac 


Harding, jr., 


David 


Hatch, 


David 


Jackson, 


Joshna 


Low, 


James 


Moore, 


Thomas 


Moore, 


Joseph 


North, 


Elisha 


Nye, 


Beniamln 
Benjamin 


PettengiU, 


Pettengill,jr., 




Page. 



Enoch 

Seth 

Oeorge 

Benjamin 

William 

Stutley 

Thaddens 

Josiah 

Obadiah 

Noah 

Aaron 

John 



Page, 

Pitts, 

Head, 

Savage, 

Stone, 

Springer, 

Snell, 

Williams, 

WUliams, 

Woodward 

White, 

Wheeler. 



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140 



raSTORY OF AUGUSTA, 



Each respective gathered church in any town or place within this province, 
that at any time shall be in want of a minister, such church shall have power, 
according to the directions given in the word of God, to choose their own 
minister; and the mt^or part of such inhabitants as do there usually attend on 
the public worship of God, and are by law duly qualified for voting in town 
affdii*s, concurring with the churcVs act, the person thus elected and approved, 
accepting thereof, settling with them, shall be the minister, towards whose 
settlement and maintenance all the inhabitants and ratable estates living 
within such town, or part of a town or place limited by law for upholding the 
public worship of God, shall be obliged to pay In proportion. In such towns 
or places where there is no church gathered, the ratable inhabitants of such 
town or place, at a meeting duly warned for that purpose, by the major vote 
of such assembly then and there met, with the advice of three neighboring 
ordained ministers, shall choose and call an orthodox, learned and pious person 
to dispense the word of God unto them ; to the settlement and maintenance of 
which minister all rateable estates and inhabitants within such town or place 
shall be assessed and pay proportionabiy. For neglecting this duty the 
selectmen, or others specially appointed by the inhabitants of such town or 
place to take care in that matter, having accepted such be-trustment, were 
liable to a fine of forty shillings each person for the first oflTence ; the second 
oflTence £4. (Mass. Prov. Laws. 169S.) 

For twenty-three years, and until the division of the town in- 
to parishes in 1794, — the voters of Hallowell employed their 
religious teachers as prescribed above. The records of the town 
clerks afford the best available illustration of the ecclesiastical 
history of the town during that era. 

Records of the Tovm Clerks. 

1772. March 23. Voted that there be fifteen pounds raised for preaching 
and schooling for this year. 

1773. March 15. Voted to have sixteen pounds raised to procure preaching ; 
and likewise to have eight pounds raised for schooling for the town. Voted 
that the selectmen procure preaching two mouths for this present year, and as 
much more as they find money in the treasurer's hands that have been voted 
for that use, and voted that the selectmen procure schooling as far as they find 
money in stock for that use, and that the selectmen proportion the money for 
schooling according to the number of children that are to be sent to school. 
Voted that James Howard, Esq., William Howard, Daniel Savage, Samuel 

Additional taxpayerSf 1 783. 

Woodward 

Paul 

Cyrus 

Samuel 

John 

Brian 



Allen, 


William 


Blake, 


Aaron 


Ballard, 


Nicholas 


BuUen, jr., 


James 


Dean, 


Caleb 


Fletcher, jr., 


John 



Hewins, i 


Benjamin 


Stickney, 


Hinkley, 


John 


Searl, 


Harris, 


Jotham 


SewaU, 


Neffro, 


Isaac 


Smith, 


Palmer, 


Nathaniel 


Thwing, 


Rice, 


Anderson 


Taylor. 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 



141 



Badcock, and Jonathan Davenport, be a committee to petition the Company 
for a ministerial lot, and other uses.^ 

1773. September 21. Voted to Join with the town of Vassalborough in 
hiring the Reverend Mr. [John] Allen, and to have the one-half of his labors 
to be spent with us for this fall and winter. 

Voted to build a meeting-house as near the centre of the town as they can ; 
and voted to build the meeting-house on the east side of the river ; that Emer- 
son Smith, Daniel Savage and John Jones be a committee to draw a plan of 
said meeting-house, in order for the town's acceptance, at the annual meeting 
in March next ; voted to build the meeting-house forty feet long and thirty 
wide. 

Voted to build a meeting-house fifty feet long and thirty five wide and 
twenty feet post ; and to be done in a worlcmanlike manner. 

Voted that the meeting-house be built by way of a town rate, and to settle 
which side of the river said house be built by way of lots. The lots drawed, 
and said house fell to the east side of the river. 

Voted to build a house as near the middle of the town as it can conveniently 
be got. 

Voted that James Cocks, Mr. Ezekiel Page and Edward Savage, Peter Hop- 
kins and Joseph Savage be a committee to procure a piece of land to set the 
meeting-house on ; and procure timber for said house, and get said house fit 
for framing. 

1774. March 15. Voted to have twenty pounds raised for preaching for the 
present year, and ten pounds for schooling. Voted, that the selectmen be a 
committee to settle with the Rev. Mr. Allen for the time he has spent his 
labors in this town. Voted to hire the Rev. Mr. Allen as long as the select- 
men find money In stock and in the constables' hands ^ for that use. 



ft Under the authority conferred by this 
vote the selectmen of Hallowell sent to 
Boothbay for Rev. John Murray, and as 
the only mode of trarelling then was by 
water, five men were employed to take the 
minister in a boat ** from and to Booth- 
bay," for which the town paid them £1 
ISs. 4d. This was an outfit and display 
beoomlQg the high standing of the reverend 
gentleman who appears to have been the 
first minister ever employed by the town. 
Rev. John Murray was a presbyterian from 
the county of Antrim, Ireland, and was 
educated at Edinburgh. He was now 
preaching at Boothbay where he had been 
settled in 1767, and was an eloquent and 
efficient minister; he left Boothbay in 1779 
much against the will of his parishioners, 
at the urgent solicitation of the people of 
the 1st Presbyterian Church in Newbnry- 
port, where he was installed in 1781, and 
there continued until his death in 1793. 



He was a man of commanding presence, 
full and melodious voice, and one of the 
moflt popular preachers of the day. He 
married Susannah Lithgow, daughter of 
Captain William Lithgow, the commandant 
of Fort Halifax. 

The constables, were at that time the 
collectors of taxes. Rev. John Allen was 
the first resident minister employed and 
paid by the town. It is not recorded where 
he preached, but probably at the Fort and 
the Howard mansion, which were the most 
commodious houses in the settlement. His 
family consisted of his wife and |at least 
one son (who boarded with him at Colonel 
William Howard*s in the Fort, for a year 
and three-quarters. He was a school-mas- 
ter to the Colonel's children, and continued 
to preach for the town until October, 1775, 
when the revolutionary troubles deprived 
the people of the ability or disposition to 
pay him. He was credited on the town 



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142 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



1775. March 20. Voted that the selectmen be a committee to procure 
preaching and schooling with the money that has been voted for that use and 
not disposed of. 

1776. May 29. Voted to hire Mr. Tharston Whiting' two Sabbaths this 
snmmer and fall. 

1776. Oct. 81. Voted not to hire the Rev. Mr. Allen by way of a town rate 
any longer. 

1777. March 10. Voted not to raise money for preaching or for other nses. 
1777. April 14. Voted that Deacon Pease Clark, Mr. Samuel Bullen and 

Mr. Abiah Coy be a committee to procure a minister to preach in this town 
for two months, upon approbation for settlement. Voted to have twenty 
pounds raised to procure preaching, and for other necessary uses. 

1777. Oct. 18. Voted to give Mr. Caleb Jewett* a call in order for settle- 
ment, and to take the pastoral charge of the church and congregation of this 
town. Voted to give Mr. Jewett a lot of land, or at least one hundred acres, 
as near the middle of the town as It can be got. Voted to give eighty pounds 
a year, after the rate of Indian corn at four shillings a bushel, and to rise or 
fall according to the price of corn, for the first five years, and afterwards to 
give one hundred pounds per year as long as he shall continue our minister. 
Voted to give Mr. Jewett five dollars per day for the time he has preached the 
Gospel in this town. Voted to give Mr. Jewett eight dollars to bear his ex- 
penses. Voted that Deacon Pease Clark, Abiah McCoy and Samuel Bullen be 



treasurer's book, under date of August 
1773, probably the time he commencad, 
"with preaching fifty-two Sabbaths, at 
24s., amoanting to £6'2 8s.,** and in the 
following Jane is charged with £27 49. paid 
by the town. In 1785 the account was un- 
adjusted, at which time Mr. Allen had de- 
oeased, leaving his son John executor of 
his will. John wrote a letter to the town 
from Portsmouth, N. H., in July of that 
year, upbraiding the town for its delin- 
quency; he reminded the town that his 
father was " a man they dearly loved ; a 
man whom they were pleased to hear ; a 
man who told them the truth ; a man who 
preached the gospel of God, and expounded 
the way of life eternal, clear to their souls* 
ravishment.** The town finally paid the 
amount due after disallowing the charge 
for interest. (See town record, August 1, 
1790.) The financial distress which came 
with the revolution must be the only excuse 
that can be suggested for the town*s tardi- 
ness in the payment of this ministerial 
debt. 
7 Thurston Whiting preached at Win- 



throp as a candidate for settlement, some of 
the time between 1773 and 1775 ; no formal 
invitation however, was extended to him to 
settle there, and in March, 1776 the town of 
Newcastle gave him a call which he ac- 
cepted, and he was ordained in July of that 
year. His ministry continued in that town 
until January, 1782, when he was dis- 
missed. The next year he preached in 
Edgecomb, where he organized a church. 
In 1784 or *85 he removed to Warren, and 
was employed about ten years In preaching 
there and in Thomaston. In 1796 he rep- 
resented the town of Warren in the legisla- 
ture. 

8 Rev. Caleb Jewett was a graduate of 
Dartmouth College in 1776, and came to 
Maine from Newburyport. In August, 
1781, he was employed to preach for six 
months by the people of Gorham. In Jan- 
uary following they gave him a call, and 
November 5, 1783, he was ordained. He 
continued in the ministry at Gorham about 
seventeen years. He ceased preaching 
about the beginning of the year 1800, and 
died soon after. 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 143 

a committee to settle with Caleb Jewett for the time he has spent his labors 
in this town. 

Voted to finish getting the meeting-house timber as soon as it can con- 
Teniently be got. 

Voted Lieut. Samuel Cony be committee-man in place of Mr. Ezekiel Page, 
In order to the carrying on of the meeting-house. 

December 14, 1778. Voted that Mr. Samuel Badcock, Mr. Isaac Savage, and 
Mr. Samuel Cony, be a committee to procure the timber for a meeting-house. 

Voted that the meeting-house be built on the county road, or on the eight- 
rod road that is allowed to run ft-om the river at the north line of Mr. George 
Brown's land. 

April 5, 1779. Voted to reconsider all the votes that was formerly voted 
concerning the meeting-house. 

Voted that the meeting-house be upon the west side of the river, on the 
road between Colonel Joseph North's and Asa Emerson's land, down on the 
intervale by the river. Voted not to build a meeting-hf>use this year. 

1779. April 6. Voted to have two hundred pounds raised to procure preach- 
ing. Voted that Mr. Samuel Badcock, senior, be the person to procure a min- 
ister to preach in this town as long as what money that is voted will procure 
preaching. 

1780. March IS. Voted that there be £200 raised for preaching. 

1780. March 17. Voted to allow Lieut. Samuel Cony's and the Widow 
Cony's account for boarding Mr. Prince " for the time he preached in this town. 

1780. September 18. Vosed to allow Mr. Samuel Badcock forty-two dollars 
per day [in continental currruncy] for procuring preaching, and for attending 
at a convention held at Wiscasset, in the whole for eighteen days. Voted to 
raise 91000 to pay Mr. Prince for preaching. 

1781. July 10. Voted to raise the sum of £50 in hard money to procure 
preaching for this present year. Voted not to send for a minister until such 
times as the money be raised to pay the minister for his preaching. 

December 19, 1781. 

Voted to reconsider all the votes that ever has been passed in this town in 
respect of building a meeting-house, and to begin all anew. 

Voted to have the meeting-house on the west side of the river, on the road 
between Colonel North's and Emerson's land by the river. *° Voted to build a 
meeting-house. Voted to build the meeting-house fifty feet long, and thirty- 

» Rev. John Prince. He was paid Au- throp street] between lots No. 7 and 8, on 

gnst 5, by William Howard, treasurer, 155 the first mile, leading to Winthrop, thence 

pounds, 2 shillings. running west northwest twenty -seven poles 

i« Deed of Town Meeting-house lot from to a stake, thence north northeast three 

Joseph and Hannah North to the town of poles to a stake, thence east southeast 

HallowelU dated November 29, 1785, con- twenty-seven poles to the Kennebec river, 

sideration £30. " The following described thence southerly by said river to the first 

piece or tract of land lying in said Hallo- mentioned bounds." Ephraim Ballard and 

well, on the west side of the Kennebec Samuel Bnllen, witnesses. (Original deed 

river, bounded as followeth, viz : Begin- with papers of Henry Sewall, in posses- 

ning at said Kennebec river at the east end sion of Joseph H. Manley, a great grand- 

of the north line of the 8-rod road [Win- son of Henry Sewall.) 



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144 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



five feet wide, and twenty-two feet long the posts. Voted that the town do 
build said meeting-hoase In the year 1782. Voted to choose five men as a com- 
mittee to see to procure the articles for said house, and to make report. Voted 
that Lieut. Samuel Cony, Amos Pollard, Ephraim Ballard, Samuel Bnlleu, and 
Ablsha Cowan, be said committee. Voted that there be £150 raised to build 
a meeting-house. Voted that the inhabitants shall have the chance to pay the 
proportion of their taxes to the committee in good merchantable lumber, or 
the produce of the land, to carrying on the meeting-house. Voted that said 
lumber, or other produce of the land be delivered upon the bank of the river, 
out of the way of the water, where the said house is to stand. 
1782. March 11. Voted to build the meeting-house this year. 

1782. March 12. Voted to build the meeting-house this year." 

1783. July 81. Voted that all the male persons of twenty-one years of age 
and upwards should be voters to give the Rev. Mr. Nathaniel Merrill a call to 
the work of the ministry in this town. Voted not to give the Rev. Mr. Na- 
thaniel Merrill a call to the work of the ministry in this town.^* 

March 10, 1783. Annual meeting. Officers elected. Voted that the com- 
mittee for carrying on the meeting-house are to continue in said business till 
the £150 is laid out on said house. Voted to sell the pew ground in the meet- 
ing-house, viz : the wall-pews on the lower floor, excepting one by the pulpit. 
Voted that the money the pews shall sell for shall be appropriated to the sole 
use of finishing the meeting-house. 

Voted that this town prefer a petition to the General Court or to the Ply- 
month company for a tract of land for the use of a minister. Voted to have 
a committee to petition for a tract of land. Voted that Bei^ftmiii PettengiU, 
Esq., Colonel William Howard and Doct. Daniel Cony be said committee for 
the purpose above to draft and prefer said petition for said land in behalf of 
this town." 



u On one occasion daring the controYersy 
proliminary to the building of the meeting- 
house, when party spirit between the con- 
tending factions ran high, it was necessary 
to take the sense of the meeting by polling 
the house. Deacon Cony, who is men- 
tioned by Judge Weston as "a remarkably 
mild and quiet man,'* led the movement in 
favor of the pending measure, by calling to 
the people as he went to one side of the 
room. "All who are on the Lord's side 
follow me!" Edward Savage, a. sturdy 
man of Irish origin, having doable teeth 
all round, with which it was said he could 
bite off a ten-penny nail, was in opposition, 
and not willing to be put down by the 
deacon's appeal, called upon all who were 
on the devil's side to follow him. The dea- 
con had the best and most numerous com- 
pany, and carried the question. (Nathan 
Weston's lleminiscenoes in Maine Farmer, 
October 30, 1851.) 



u Mr. Merrill's preaching was not ac- 
ceptable to Captain Henry Sewall, whose 
tense calvanism was swift to sense the 
heretical discords— the voices and thunders 
and lightnings— from the lurid valley of 
Armageddon. 

18 The Plymouth proprietors by Arodi 
Thayer, their clerk, on the 28th day of 
November, 1811, granted and assigned to 
the inhabitants of the town of Augusta 
** a tract or parcel of land situate on the 
easterly side of Kennebec river, bounded 
westerly on the rear of the 3d range of lots 
on Winslow's plan, northerly on land 
granted to Barnabas Basset, southerly on 
Lot No 17, and easterly on Lot No. 19, on 
a plan made by Philip Bullen, surveyor, 
dated the 27th day of February, 1809, con- 
taining eighty-seven acres more or less, and 
is the southerly part of Lot No. 18 on the 
said Bullen's plan ; to and for the ase and 
support of the ministry in said town of 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 



145 



Voted that Colonel Joseph North, Daniel Cony and George Brown be a com- 
mittee to receive and examine the accounts of the committee for carrying on 
the meeting-house. Voted to raise the sum of ninety pounds towards finish- 
ing the outside of the meeting-house, and laying the lower floor. Voted that 
the peoplo that pay their rates towards carrying on the meeting-house, may 
pay it in lumber at the current price, to be delivered in rafts at the meeting- 
house landing, to the meetiug-house committee. Voted that the committee 
postpone selling the pew-ground or pews until the further order of the town. 
Voted that the committee for carrying on the meeting-house in March, 1782, 
do continue to receive the lumber last voted as well as the former. 

1784. March 8. Voted that Ephralm Ballard, Samuel Dutton, Col. Joseph 
North, be a committee to procure a Gospel minister to preach upon probation 
in this town. Voted that there be £50 raised for preaching. March 9, Voted 
that Ezekiel Page, Daniel Cony and Abraham Page be a committee to look out 
200 acres of land for a ministerial lot, and to apply to Col. Joseph North to 
lay out said land at the expense of this town. 

1785. March 16. Voted to raise £50 to hire preaching.'* 

1785. September 6. Voted that the town's committee be directed to en- 
deavor to hire the Rev. Seth Noble to continue his service in this town till the 
middle of March next, then voted that the town's committee be directed to 
wait upon the Rev. Seth Noble, *^ and inform him that it is the desire and vote 
of the town that he continue his public service in this town until the middle 
of March next. 

1785. November 29. Voted upon the letter wrote by Samuel Vaughan, Esq. , 
which was read In town-meeting, that Messrs. Joseph North, Esq., Capt. 
Henry Sewall, and Daniel Cony, be a committee on behalf of the town to re- 
turn the thanks of the town to Samuel Vaughan, Esq., for his very generous 
offer and proposal to this town respecting Mr. Hazlet. Also voted that the 



Angasta, with liberty for said inhabitants 
with the written assent of the minister and 
choFch for ttie time being, to sell and con- 
vey th 3 same in fee, on condition that the 
proodods of such sale be forever a fund nn- 
dsr the care and direction of the selectmen 
of the town, the interest whereof shall he 
annually applied by them to the nse and 
support of a congregational minister or 
minister;! in said town." (Ken. Reg. of 
Deeds, Book 1 , Page 219.) The occasion of 
this rather fnigal gift in trust by the Ply- 
month proprietors was the ordination of 
Benjamin Tappan and his settlement as 
minister of the Sonth Parish, on the 16th 
of Ckrtober of the same year. The wife of 
Rev. Mr. Tappan was a daughter of Thom- 
as L. Winthrop and grand-daughter of 
Governor Bowdoin, both prominent in the 
Plymouth company. The town, on the 
8th of Ai)ril, 1819, authorized the sale of 

10 



the lot to Benjamin Worth, yeoman (Ken. 
Beg. of Deedj, Book 146, Page 140), which 
was done by Lewis Hamlen, Daniel Stone, 
Church Williams and Reuol Williams, 
committee for the inhabitants of Augusta, 
March 16, 1819, for the consideration of 
$250. Assented to by the chnrch, Septem- 
ber 8, 1819, and by Parson Tappan Sep- 
tember 13, same year. 

i< Rev. Bbenezer Kinsman preached oc- 
casionally in this town this year, at the 
dwelling houses of Thomas Sewall, Jere- 
miah Ingraham, and Benjamin Pettenglll. 

16 Rev. Seth Noble, a native of West- 
field, Mass. The next year he was in- 
stalled as the minister of Kenduskeag plan- 
tation (now Bangor), where he continued 
until the end of that century ; he died in 
1807. Edwin A. Noble, shoe merchant and 
oommercial traveler, of Augusta, is a great- 
grandson of Rev. Seth Noble. 



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146 HISTORr OF AUGUSTA. 

committee apply to the Rev. Mr. Hazlet, and desire him to continue his pab- 
lic service in this town as a preacher, for the term of two months. 

1785. December 6. Voted that the town will hire the Rev. Mr. Hazlet to 
preach in this town upon probation for settlement. 

1786. March 6. Under the 12th article [of the warrant calling the meeting], 
the question being put to see if the town will give the Rev. Mr. Hazlet an in- 
vitation to settle in this town in the work of the ministry, voted, and it 
passed in the negative. Under the 13th article, the question being put, to see 
if the town will give the Rev. Mr. Noble an invitation to settle in this town 
in the work of the ministry, and it passed in the negative. 

1786. May 1. Voted to allow Rev. William Hazlet >• seventy dollars for 
fourteen days* preaching, Tlianksgiving day included, at five dollars per day. 
Also voted to allow Rev. Seth Noble the sura of nine pounds for six sabbaths 
preaching, at one pound ten shillings per day. 

1786. May 8. Motion being made *'to see if the town will vote to give Mr. 
Isaac Foster, Junior, of Stafford, in the State of Connecticut, an invitation to 
settle in this town in the work of the ministry," voted, by polling the house, 
and it passed in the affirmative by a majority of fifty-seven /or and tour against 
it. Voted, and chose : 

James Howard, Esq., Mr. Jeremiah Ingraham, Capt. Nathan Weston, 
Benjamin Pettengili, Esq., Mr. Samuel Badcock, Capt. Daniel Savage, 
Deacon Samuel Cony, Capt. Enoch Page, Mr. James Page, 

Mr. Noah Woodward, Lieut. Simon Dearborn, Mr. Ezekiel Page, 
Mr. Jonathan Davenport, Capt. Henry Sewall, Daniel Cony, 

a committee to draught and report what stipulations in their opinion, will 
be proper on the part of the town to make Mr. Isaac Foster for his support 
and maintenance. Then voted to adjourn this meeting twenty minutes, then 
to meet again at this place [the meeting-house]. Met according to adjourn- 
ment, and committee reported, that the town pay, and do hereby promise to 
pay the said Isaac Foster the sum of £100 lawflil money annually, the first 
payment to be made at the expiration of one year ft'om the time of his ordi- 
nation ; which sum shall be considered as a yearly salary to enable him to sup- 
port his family, and to be paid him upon condition that he does accept of the 
town's invitation and proposals, and shall formally and regularly receive ordi- 
nation. This stipulation to continue and be in force so long as he the said 
Mr. Isaac Foster, continues to be the town's minister and public teacher ; and 
also the farther sum of £50 settlement. Report unanimously accepted, and 
voted a further sum of £10 per year for five years ft*om the time of ordina- 
tion. Then voted and chose: Benjamin Pettengili, Esq., Capt. Enoch Page, 
and Mr. Nathaniel Hersey, Capt. Henry Sewall, and Daniel Cony, as a com- 
mittee to wait upon Mr. Isaac Foster and acquaint him with the votes of the 
meeting. Then dismissed the meeting. 

1786. August 5. To the Church and People of God in Hallowell. Honored 
and Beloved : It having pleased God, the great disposer of all events, to incline 
this church and people to invite me to settle with them in the work of the 

u For further reference to Mr. Hazlet, Bee Bibliography of Hallowell. 



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RELIOIOUS AKNAL8. 



147 



Gospel ministry ; after seeking to him for direction In so important an enter- 
prise and after employing every means for investigating of truth, talcing un- 
der consideration the union which at present subsists, with the generosity that 
appears among you, I view It my duty, and do hereby signify my acceptance 
of your call to settle among you in the work of the Gospel Ministry. Sensible 
of my own insufficiency for these things^ and the great need I stand in of Divine 
teaching and support, I entreat your pious and fervent prayers for me, who am 
willing to become your servant for Christ's sake ; should so near a connection 
take place in a course of Providence, permit me, my Brethren, to rely on your 
candour^ while I faithfully improve the talent God has given me for your 
spiritual good, and trust you will watch over me in the Lord as becometh 
saints. I am, honored and beloved, your fk>iend and humble servant, 

Isaac Fostrb. 

1786. August U. Mr. Isaac Foster's answer being read, voted to have the 
said answer recorded in the town's book of records. Then voted and chose 
Lieutenant Simon Dearborn, Joseph North, and William Howard, esquires, as 
a committee to confer with Mr. Foster, and report what time will be con- 
venient for ordination ; who report the second week in October next. The 
report accepted, and the second Wednesday in October next Is appointed the 
day for ordination. Then voted to send to seven churches to assist on the 
occasion. The Church then report that Mr. Foster have the nomination of two 
churches ; that the town have the nomination of three Churches, and the 
Church fill up the other two. The report of the church accepted. 

The town then nominated to send (1) to the Church in Bristol, Rev. Alexander 
McLean, pastor ; (2) to the Church in Bath, Rev. Francis Winter, pastor ; 
and (S) to the Church In Harpswell, Rev. Samuel Eaton, pastor; then the 
Church report that they have made choice, or nominated (4) to the Church in 
East Pownalborough, Rev. Thomas Moore, pastor; and (6) to the Church in 
Falmouth, 2nd Parish ; Rev. Ebenezer Williams pastor) . Voted that the town 
concur with the Church. Then voted, and chose Daniel Cony, Mr. Brown 
Emerson, and Joseph North, Esq., as a committee to write and sign in behalf 
of the town the letters missive. 



Additional 


taxpayeri, 1784. 










Ballard, 


Jesse 


Follett, 


Samaei 


Prescott, 


JoBiah 


Blackman, 


Joseph 


Foster, 


Joseph 


Prescott, 


William 


Brooks, 


Thomas 


FilleDrown, 


Joseph 
Daniel 


RoUins, 


John O. 


Bums, 




Goodwin, 


Bobbins, 


Benjamin 


Brown, 


Andrew 


Goodwin, 


Henry 


Sewall, 


James 


Cocks, jr., 
Church, 


George 


Goodwin, 


Isaac 


Savage, 2d. 


Ebenezer 


Simon 


Harriman, 


James 


Savage, 


John 


Conch, 


Ezra 


Hodges, 


Moses 


Smith, 


James 


Caten, 


Oliver 


Hall, 


Joseph 


Stackpole, 


Charles 


aark. 


Jeremiah 


Hall, 


Nathan 


Taylor, 


Jabes 


Cowen, 


David 


McNight, 


Nathan 


W^eston, Sr., 


Jabez 


Cowen, jr., 


Daniel 


Norcross. 


William 


White, 


William 


Cowen, 


WoodbridgeOdlin, 


Thomas 


White, 


James 


Cowen, 


James 


Pollard, 


David 


WaU, jr., 


James 


Carr, 


David 


Dudley 


Watson. 


Thomas 


Densmore. 


William 


Pierce. 






Benjamin 


Follett, 


Samuel 


Pierce, 







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148 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



Voted and chose Joseph North and William Howard, Esqs., and Mr. Amos 
Pollard, as a committee to provide the entertainment of the Council. 

August 14, 1786. Voted to do something: towards flnlshino^ the meeting- 
house ; then voted and chose Messrs. Henry Sewall, Joseph North, Samuel Bui- 
len, Daniel Cony, and James Cocks, for a committee to draw a plan in what man- 
ner they think proper to finish the meeting-house, and to lay the same before 
the town at the next meeting. Also to do something towards finishing the 
galleries. 

1787. April 7. Voted to grant to the Rev. Isaac Foster fifteen cords of fire- 
wood for the current year; to be estimated at six shillings per cord; to be 
apportioned by the assessors on the inhabitants and non-residents, at the time 
of assessing his salary in money and in wood, nearly as may be, to the 
sixteenth of a cord, and to be delivered at his dwelling house by the first day 
of January next, otherwise to be collected in money. 

1787. May 7. Voted that the Rev. Mr. Foster's salary shall be assessed 
and committed as soon as may be for the present year ; and that his salary shall 
in fqture be assessed and committed in the month of April annually. 

September 26, 1787. Voted to build pews in the meeting-house. Voted, 
Messrs. James Cocks, Ephraim Ballard and Jason Livermore to draw plans of 
the pews to be built in the meeting-house, and lay them before the town on the 
day this meeting stands acyoumed to. 

October 24, 1787. Voted not to accept the plan made by the above men- 
tioned committee. 

Voted to build a porch over the front door of the meeting-house. Voted to 
give some ground room that shall be saved by building a porch in a workman- 
like manner. Voted to choose a committee to agree with some person to build 
the porch — not to give more than the room saved. Voted that the committee 
consist of James Cocks, Ephraim Ballard and Lazarus Goodwin. 

December 24, 1787. Voted to reconsider a vote passed October 24, 1787, 
and then voted to accept of said plan made by Messrs. James Cocks, Ephraim 
Ballard, and Jason Livermore, dated October 24, 1787. Voted that Messrs. 
James Cocks, Ephraim Ballard and Lazarus Goodwin be a committee to pro- 
cure stuff" suitable to build the pews, and for to finish the lower part of the 
meeting-house agreeably to the plan this day accepted by the town. 



Additional 

Jabez 

Supply 

Rnfns 

Elisha 

Benjamin 

Josiah 

John 

Nathaniel 

Nathaniel 

James 

John 

Gershom 

William 

Elijah 

Simon 

Simon 

Brown 

Eliphalet 



t€txpayerst 1 786. 
Bates, 
Belcher, 
Bent, 
Bisbee, 
Bisbee, 
Blake, 
Blake, 
Blake, 
Brown, 
Barton, 
Clayton, 
Cox, 
Curtis, 
DaTls, 
Dearborn, 
Dearborn, jr. 
Emerson, 
Gilman. 



John 

Nathaniel 

Obadiah 

David 

Eleazer 

Asa 

David 

Henry 

Peter 

William 

Thomas 

Ichabod 

Ezekiel 

Benjamin 

Eliphalet 

Daniel 

Edward 

Moses 



Haines, 


Nathaniel 


Hamlen, 


Daniel 


Harris, 


Jotham 


Learned, 


Job 


Luce, 


Thomas 


Mason, 


WUliam 


Morgan, 


Asaph 


Nowlan, 


Ebenezer 


Odlin, 


Jesse 


Palmer, 


Benjamin 


Patten, 


Abraham 


Pitts, 


Samuel 


Porter, 




Prescott, 


Joseph 


Bobbins, 


Joseph 


Savage, jr.. 


Asahel 


ls;x^'- 





Shaw, 

Smith, 

Smith, 

Springer, 

Stickney, 

Stone, jr., 

Swift, 

Tyler, 

Vose, 

Wade, 

Wellman, 

Welch, 

White, 

Williams, 

WiUiams, 2d. 

Wyman. 



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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 



149 



1788. September 9. A paper sl^ed by the Rev. Isaac Foster, containing 
some terms which he proposed for a dismission, had two several readings in 
the meeting. The question being put whether the town will accept or comply 
with the terms proposed by Mr. Foster relative to a dismission, and it passed 
in the negative ; voted to choose a committee of three to wait on Mr. Foster 
and request him to attend in this meeting ; and Mr. Nathan Weston, Capt. 
Enoch Page, and Mr. David Thomas were chosen for said committee. They 
attended on Mr. Foster and he attended. The question was asked Mr. Foster 
if he had other or fhrther proposals to make; and he answered, he would pro- 
pose to take £200 ; and the question was put whether the town would accept 
or comply with the proposal of two hundred pounds ; and it passed in the 
negative. Voted to adjourn the meeting for five minutes, and It was adjourned 
accordingly. Met again and the meeting was opened. The question was put, 
whether the clause for granting money should be dismissed, and it passed in 
the affirmative, viz., dismissed. 

1788. October SO. On motion made the question was put whether the town 
will agree with the Rev. Isaac Foster to have the contract between the town 
and Mr. Foster cancelled, and it passed In the affirmative. Voted that the 
committee should consist of three ; and Mr. Noah Woodward, Mr. Ezckiel 
Page, and Mr. Benjamin Brown were chosen for said committee. Voted to 
adjourn the meeting for the space of fifteen minutes. Met again according to 
adjournment. The committee returned and reported verbally that Mr. Foster 
said he had nothing to offer with regard to an agreement ; but that he was 
willing to concur in calling a Council if the town and church see fit. On mo- 
tion being made, the question was put, whether the town in coi\j unction with 
the church, call an Ecclesiastical Council, to hear, judge, and advise in all 
matters of grievance that shall be regularly laid before said Council, and it 
passed in the affirmative. Voted that the Council that was chosen to ordain 
Mr. Foster, shall be the Council, except Mr. Foster's two brothers, and that 
Mr. Foster shall choose two others In the room of his two brothers ; and Mr. 
Foster nominated Mr. Williams of New Casco and his church, and Mr. Win- 
ship of Woolwich and his church. Voted that the third Tuesday In November 
next be the day for said Council to convene. Voted and chose Deacon Cony 
in behalf of the town to sign the letters missive. Voted to choose a commit- 
tee of three to provide for the entertainment of the Council, and Mr. Jason 
Livermore, Ephralm Ballard and Mr. Samuel Cumings were chosen for said 



Additional 

George 
James 
Daniel 
WiUiam 
Joseph 
Joshua 
Andrew- 
James 
Samuel 
Cotton 
Daniel 
Jonathan 
Isaac 
Oliver 



taxpayers^ 

Andros, 

Black. 

Branch, 

Brigga, 

Brown, 

Burgess, 

Bennett, 

Child, 

Church, 

Clark, 

Coy, 

Cross, 

Cottle, 

Colbnm, 



1788. 



Edmund 

Thomas 

William 

Jeremiah 

John 

Nathan 

Abiather 

Edmnnd 

Theophilus 

Ziba 

Abiah 

Ichabod 

Eunice 

Nathaniel 



Dana, 

Davis, 

Dorr, 

Dummer, 

Freeman, 

Fuller, 

Graen, 

Greenleaf, 

Hamlen, 

Hall, 

Harrington, 

Hawes, 

Hallowell, 

Hinkley. 



Samuel 


Hussey, 


Thomas 


Kennadv, 


Wm. 


Lithgow, jr.. 


Jason 


Livermore, 


Sqnier 


Lyon, 


Samuel 


Metcalf, 


« Samuel 


Norcross, jr., 


Philip 


Norcross, 2d. 


Caleb 


Palmer, 


Samuel 


Pool, 


Nathan 


Sherbum, 


David 


Sylvester, 


Samuel 


Sweat, 


Anderson 


Taylor. 



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150 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



committee. Voted that the committee appointed by the town and chnrch in 
conjunction to sign the letters missive, be also appointed to convey them to 
the several charches which are to constitute or compose the Council. 

178ft. December 18. Voted to choose a committee of three persons to wait 
upon Mr. Foster; and Mr. Nathan Weston, Mr. Samuel Cony and Mr. James 
Page were chosen for said committee. Then adjourned the meeting for the 
space of half an hour. Met again according to adjournment, and the com- 
mittee reported by giving or communicating Mr. Foster's answer in writing, 
which was read twice in the meeting, and is as follows, viz., **To the Town 
of Hallowell, Grentlemen : I shall not ask a dismission npon the result of 
Council ; but as I have long been desirous that a dismission should take place, 
am still willing to continue my former motion now in the clerk's office. If the 
town are desirous that a separation should take place, and are not willing to 
comply with my proposals, I shall expect the town will make a proposal to 
me, and give me time to take it under consideration ; and I will return you my 
answer at your annual meeting, or to this if you please to adjourn to some 
future day. Isaac Foster, Hallowell, December 18, 1788.** 

On motion being made, the question being put whether the town will accept 
of the proposal made in Mr. Foster's answer, brought into the meeting and 
communicated by the committee ; and it passed in the negative by a majority 
of seventy-four against and seven for it. The proceedings. Judgment and ad- 
vice of the Ecclesiastical Council lately convened in this town, of which the 
Kev. Thomas Brown [of Stroudwater] was made moderator, being read and 
considered in town meeting. Voted, that whereas, the Rev. Isaac Foster, both 
by his principles and behaviour, has given Just grounds (in the opinion of this 
town) for uneasiness and complaint against him ; especially when viewed and 
considered as a public teacher; the subject matter whereof has recently been 
mutually submitted to a learned, Judicious Council; who after a 'tedious and 
painfull investigation of the subject of complaint, and the allegations laid be- 
fore them ; have advised and recommended the dismission of Mr. Foster ftom 
his pastoral office in this town. They, the said Council, being clearly of opinion 
that Mr. Foster can be no longer useful in the ministry here ; and as there 
doth not appear to this town the smallest probability of Mr. Foster's being 
any longer usefhl as a public teacher in this place, it is considered that he has 
forfeited his ministerial character. The town of Hallowell in legal town- 
meeting assembled, do therefore, agreeable to and in compliance with the ad- 
vice and recommendation of the Council, as well as for the regard we have 
for the welfare of this town, and the good of Religion, do therefore grant 
him, the said Rev. Isaac Foster, a dismission from his pastoral office as a pub- 
lic teacher in this town ; and he is hereby dismissed accordingly, by a majority 
of eighty /or and nine against. 

Voted that the said Isaac Foster be not allowed to preach in this town's 

Additional taxpayers^ 1 789. 

John 

Elisha 

Jesse 

Ephraim 

Ephraim 



Arnold, 


Charles 


Cocks, 


John 


Goff, jr., 


Bean, 


Jonathan 


Davis & Son, 


William 


Hoyt,' 


Bullen, 


Benjamin 


Dudley, 


William 


Howard, jr., 


Burgess, 


Daniel 


Foster, 


Benjamin 


Lock. 


Burgess, jr., 


John 


Goff. 







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RELIGIOUS ANNALS. 151 

meeting-hoase any longer, and that the sexton be ordered to keep the meeting- 
house doors shut against him as a preacher, by a majority of sixty for^ and seven 
against.*^ 

Voted, that the town cleric be directed to serve Mr. Foster with an attested 
copy of the two foregoing votes as soon as may be. 

Voted, that the assessors of this town be directed without delay to levy and 
assess upon the Inhabitants and property in the town, the balance due to Mr. 
Foster as a sahsiry, including the whole of the present month of December ; 
and commit the same to the collector of taxes, with a warrant in due form 
of law, requiring him to collect and pay the same uuto William Howard, 
Esq., town treasurer, or to his successor in that office on or before the first 
day of March next; which sum as also all other sums if any there be due 
to Mr. Foster from this town, the said tre:isurer bo and hereby is directed to 
pay and adjust with Mr. Foster as soon as may be ; and talce his receipt in 
fUll for the same; and in case the said sum or sums be not collected and paid 
into the treasury of this town, on or before the first day of March next; then 
the treasurer is hereby authorized and impowered to borrow on the credit of 
this town a sum sufficient to enable him to pay the balance which may be as- 
sessed for that purpose and not collected, in order to complete a settlement 
with Mr. Foster. 

1788. Voted that Daniel Cony, Benjamin Pettengill, Esq., and Mr. Jason 
Livermore, be a committee to communicate the thanlcs of the town to the sev- 
eral gentlemen who composed the ecclesiastical council lately convened in this 
place, and whereof the Rev. Thomas Brown was moderator, and inform them 
that the town of Hallowell entertain a venerable opinion of the conduct of 
said Council ; the conspicuous candor and impartiality manifested by them 
both in the hearing and decision of the subject respecting this town and the 
Bev. Isaac Foster, meet the cordial approbation of the town. 

Thus ended in a lock-out the troublous and unhappy pastorate 
of the only settled minister of the early town of Hallowell. The 
specific offense of Parson Foster in his sacred oflSce was never 
intimated in any record that has come to us. The annals of the 
town are silent on the subj'ect and those of the church were soon 
lost. Even the date of the formation of the church and the 
names of the few persons composing it are now unknown.^® Cer- 
tain it is there wei'e on guard within it enough redoubtable cal- 
vanists to keep off the dragons of heresy and make life miserable 
to the minister. The dominant doctrines of the ccmffvesration- 
alisra of that day comprised a personal trinity, vicarious atone- 
ment, election and predestination, the resurrection of the ma- 
terial body, the everlasting torture of lost souls, and the litenil 

^ See Mn. BaUard's Diary, December is Mrs. BaUard's Diary, January 27, 
21, 1788. 1787. 



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152 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

interpretation of Scripture. The preacher of tender and affec- 
tionate nature whose love for his kind recoiled in the lea^tfrom 
the dogmas of that dreadful theology, was a weakling and unfit 
to be a public teacher. There arose a personal controversy and 
quarrel between some of the membei-s of the flock and the shep- 
herd, during which the latter sued the former for slander, in the 
court militant at Pownalborough, and won his case 1 

The result of the trial was the exemplary fining of two irate 
disciples ^® whose consequent discomfiture tended to intensify 
their zeal for doctrinal purity and their holy wrath againsttheir 
vindicated pastor. The alienation of a few elders soon spread 
to a maiority of the members of the church. The lay voters of 
the town did not join hastily the crusade against their minister — 
who was cultured, pleasing, popular, and morally above re- 
proach ; many gave him their sympathy and support so long as 
he was with them. 

Mr. Foster continued to reside in the town until the following 
year, when he removed temporarily to Vassalborough ; but his 
usefulness as a minister in this region was impaired, and he soon 
left the province never to return to it again. 

January 30, 1789. The qaestion was put whether the town wUl accept of 
the doings of the auditors of accounts and discharge the meeting-house com- 
mittee of the small balance that appears to be due from them, or which is not 
particularly accounted for, and it passed in the affirmative, to discharge the 
meeting-house committee. 

1789. January 30. To see if the town will choose a committee to agree and 
settle with the Rev. Isaac Foster, and take a discharge ft-om him, — motion be- 
ing made and seconded to dismiss this article, the question was put, and it 
passed in the affirmative (viz., dismissed). 

1789. May 4. To see if the town will choose a committee to confer with 
Mr. Foster on his proposals for a final settlement with the town,— this article 
voted to be dismissed. Voted and chose a committee of three to look out a 
lot for a ministerial lot, viz., Joseph North, James Page, and Ephraim Bal- 
lard. 

1789. October 3. To see if the town will join with the Church and Mr. Isaac 
Foster in calling an Ecclesiastical Council in order for a re-hearing of the 
grounds of controversy between this town and Mr. Foster, — Voted to dismiss 
this article in the warrant. Voted to choose a committee of five to take into 
consideration the request of Mr. Foster and the letters from the ministers of 

10 The church which in concurrence with date Mrs. Ballard records that she attended 
the town called Mr. Foster, was in opera- a lecture preparatory to the observance ot 
tion before March 15th, 1785, as on that the Lord*s Supper. 



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153 



Boston and Jndge Snllivan; said committee to report at the adjournment of 
this meeting. Voted and chose for said committee, William Lithgow, junior, 
Esq., Henry Sewall, Esq., Nathan Weston, James Carr, and Jason Llvermore. 
Voted to accept the letter reported by the committee to be sent to the minis- 
ters of Boston. 

1789. October 80. Voted William Howard a committee to settle with Mr. 
Foster, agreeable to the report of the referees, and to take a discharge and 
acquittance f^om said Foster for this town. 

1790. August 1. To sec if the town will allow interest on the account of 
the late Rev. John Allen, — Voted not to grant interest. Voted to authorize 
the town treasurer, and he is hereby authorized and directed to give his note 
of hand for the sum of £30 18 shillings, payable to the Rev. Mr. Daniel Shute 
in eighteen months flrom this date, with interest fh>m the date of said note till 
paid, provided the amount be endorsed on Mr. Foster's note. 

1791. April 4. Voted to raise fifty pounds for the purpose of hiring preach- 
ing. Voted that the selectmen be the committee for procuring preaching ■» 

1792. April 2. Voted to raise £16 for the purpose of liiring preaching, 
chose Daniel Cony, Nathaniel Dummer and Joseph North, Esqs., a committee 
for the purpose of hiring preaching ; and voted that the preaching be performed 
at the meeting-house the ensuing year as usual. 

1792. September 18. Voted that Mr. David Smith of Ipswich be invited to 
tarry and preach in this town upon probation, the farther term of seven 
months, and that the committee for procuring preaching be requested to make 
the communication.'^ 



» Rev. Eliphalet Smith preached at the 
Hook on the 23d of Jaooary. This is the 
earliest mention we have of preaching at 
that place ; the service was in a private honse 
as there was not then any public bnildlng 
in the hamlet. Captain Henry Sewall at- 
tended, and was so much edified that he in- 
vited Mr. Smith to pieach in the meeting- 
hoQse the next Sabbath. The invitation 
was accepted, bat owing to the inclemency 
of the weather the services were held in the 
oonrt-honse, which ''was more convenient 
in stormy weather than the meeting-honse, 
as it would admit of fire." Mr. Smith 
preached in town again in Febrnary and 
March. Rev. Jacob Emerson of Starling 
(now Fayette) preached in the meeting- 
house May SOth. Captain Sewall was pres- 
ently instromental in engaging Rev. Adon- 
iram Jndson as a candidate, who came to 
Fort Western in June and preached for the 
first time July 3, 1791. He continued to 
officiate in the town until August 8th, when 
his candidacy for settlement ended. This 
was Rev. Adoniram Judson, Senior, father 
of the missionary in Burmah ; he was bom 
in Woodbury, Conn., June, 1752 ; m. No- 
vember 23, 1786, Abigail Brown, of Tiver- 



ton, R. I. Soon after his marriage he 
settled in Maiden. One who saw Rev. Ad- 
oniram Judson, the elder, in his later life, 
when he was over seventy years of age, 
wrote of him : "He was, as I remember him, 
a man of decidedly imposing appearance ; 
his stature was rather above the average ; 
his white hair, erect position, grave utter- 
ances, and somewhat taciturn manner, to- 
gether with the position he naturally took 
in society, left one somewhat at a loss 
whether to dass him with a patriarch of the 
Hebrews or a censor of the Romans. He 
was through life, esteemed a man of inflex- 
ible Integrity and uniform consistency of 
Christian character. (See Life of Adon- 
iram Judson, by his son Edward Judson.) 
Rev. Adoniram Judson, Sr., joined the 
Baptist Communion, and was the pastor of 
the 2d Baptist Church of Nobleboro, in 
1820. 

^ Mr. Smith came as a candidate for the 
vacant ministry ; he arrived June 27th, and 
boarded with Captain Sewall. He declined 
the town's invitation to tarry and preach 
seven moifths longer, as he officiated for the 
last time September SOth, 1792. 



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154 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

Sept. 18, 1792. Voted that all former votes relative to flnishing the meeting* 
hoase and building a porch, and the appointment of committees for either of 
those purposes, be reconsidered, and they are hereby rendered nnll and void. 

Voted, that the town will take effectual measures for flnishing the meeting- 
house. Voted, that Henry Sewall, William Howard, and Joseph North, 
Esquires, be a committee to draw and report a plan for flnishing the meeting- 
house, with an estimate of the value of each pew ; and that they be requested 
to report at the next meeting. Voted that the pews be sold at public auction 
to the highest bidder, provided that they shall not be sold under the price 
affixed to them respectively by the town. 

November 2, 1792. Voted that the plan reported by the committee to draw 
the same for the purpose of flnishing the meeting-house, be accepted, with 
their estimation of the pews. Voted that the pews agreeable to said plan be 
set up at the said estimation and sold to the. highest bidder, and the money 
arising ftrom snch sale to be approbated to the sole purpose or flnishing the 
meeting-house; that the selectmen for the time being be a committee to make 
such sale accordingly ; and that the sale be made on the day of the next annual 
town meeting for the choice of town officers ; the said committee flrst giving 
notice of the time and conditions of such sale by advertisements at two or 
three public places in the town. 

1793. May 6. Voted to raise ;^60 for the purpose of procuring preaching in 
this town the present year; and one third part thereof be performed in the 
Academy at the Hook. Voted and chose Nathaniel Dummer, Daniel Cony and 
Henry Sewall, Esquires, a committee to procure a preacher." Voted and chose 
Nathaniel Dummer, Joseph North, Beriah Ingraham, James Page, Joseph 
Smith, Samuel Bullen, Henry Sewall, William Howard, and Brian Fletcher, a 
committee to consider the subject relative to dividing the town into two 
parishes, and report at the next annual meeting. 

October U, 1798. Voted that the pew-ground in the meeting-house, agree- 
ably to the plan already made and accepted, be sold at public auction [upon 
conditions prescribed] ; but that No. 26 be reserved for the use of the town as 
a parsonage pew. That William Howard, Henry Sewall and Ellas Craig or 
any two of them be a committee to make the sale. 

April 9, 1794. Voted that the selectmen (namely, Nathaniel Dummer, Mr. 
Elias Craig, and Matthew Hay ward, Esq.,) be a committee to petition the 
Legislature to pass an act of incorporation, dividing the town of Hallowell 
into three parishes, to be designated the South Parish, the Middle Parish, and 
the North Parish, conformably to the following lines [specifled in the act of 
incorporation]. 

Incorporation of Three Parishes. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-four. An 
Act dividing the Town of Hallowell in the county of Lincoln into three 

MThe committee in July engaged the per week. He continued to preach in town 

services of Rev. Charles Turner, at $4.50 until the following March, performing a 

a Sabbath ; and Dr. Daniel Cony contracted third of the time at the Hook, 
to board him and keep his horse for 128. 



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155 



Parishes, and for incorporating the same. Be U enacted by the Senate and 
Hoase of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by the authority 
of the same, That the Town of Hallo well in the county of Lincoln be and the 
same hereby is dlTlded into three distinct Parishes, to be designated the South 
Parish, the Middle Parish, and the North Parish ; and the following shall be 
the dividing line between said Parishes, viz : Between the South and the 
Middle Parish, the dividing line shall begin at Cobbosseecontee pond, at the 
northwest corner of the mile Lot number twenty-three ; thence running east 
southeast, In the north line of said Lot to Kennebec river ; thence easterly 
across said river to the northwest comer of Lot number eighteen, being the 
same Lot on which Jonathan Davenport now lives; thence east southeast to 
the eastern bounds of said Town. And between the Middle Parish and the 
north Parish, the dividing line shall begin at the westerly bank of Kennebeck 
river, at the northeast corner of Lot number eighteen; thence running In the 
North line of said Lot west northwest, and continuing the same course to the 
west side of the said Town; then beginning again on the easterly bank of said 
Kennebec river, at the northwest corner of Lot number thirty-four, and thence 
running in the north line of said Lot, east southeast, one mile, to a road; 
thence northerly by said road, fitty rods ; thence east southeast, to the east 
side of the Town. And that all the lands in said Town with the inhabitants 
thereon, south of the line dividing the South Parish and the Middle Parish as 
above described, be and hereby are incorporated into a separate Parish by the 
name of the South Parish in Hallowell. Also all the land in said Town with 
the inhabitants thereon, between the line dividing the South Parish and the 
Middle Parish, and the line dividing the Middle Parish and the North Parish, 
as above described and expressed, be and hereby are incorporated into a sep- 
arate Parish by the name of the Middle Parish in Hallowell. And also, all the 
land in said Town with the inhabitants thereon north of the line dividing the 
Middle Parish and the North Parish, as above described, be and hereby are in- 
corporated into a separate Parish, by the name of the North Parish in Hallo* 
vsell. And that each of said Parishes be, and hereby is vested with all the 
powers, privileges and immunities which other Parishes within the Common- 
wealth are entitled to, or by law ei^oy. 

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid. That any of the in- 
habitantts of said Town of Hallowell, shall at all times forever hereafter, have 
full liberty to join themselves with their families and estates to either of the 
Parishes aforesaid in said Town ; provided they shall some time in the month 
of March certify in writing under their hands to the clerk of said Town, to 



Additional taxpayers, 1790. 




Lemuel 


Bent, 


John 


Hinkley, 


Asa 


Cummings, 


James 


Hinkley, 2d, 


George 


Crosby, 


Peter 


Jones, 


WiUiam 


Davis, 


Richard 


KeUy, 


Nathaniel 


Dummer, 


James 


Lothrop, 


Elias 


Field, 


Isaac 


Livermore, 


EUphalet 


Gilman, jr., 


Alfred 


Martin, 
Metcalf, 


Jabez 


Gould, 


Joseph 


Enoch 


Greely, 


Thomas 


Metcalf, 


Abiafcher 


Green, 


John 


Molloy, 


Elijah 


Hinkley. 


Alvln 


Nye. 



Peter 

Ebenezer 

Eliab 

Ichabod 

Jeremiah 

Caleb 

Nicholas 

Charles 

Peter T. 

Nathaniel 

Daniel 



Parker, 

Perkins, 

Perkins, 

Plaisted, 

Powell, 

Stanley, 

Shaw. 

Yanghan, 

Vose, 

Vose, 

WUber. 



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156 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



Which of said Parishes they choose to beloog; whereupon they shall there- 
after be liable to be taxed, with their estates in such Parish mentioned in such 
certificate, their proportion of all Parish taxes and not elsewhere. 

And be it farther enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the Honorable 
Daniel Cony, Esq., be and he hereby is authorized to issue his several war- 
rants, directed to some suitable person in each of said Parishes respectively, 
requiring him to notify and warn the inhabitants of such Parish to meet at 
the time and place expressed in such warrants for the purpose of choosing 
such officers as may by law be chosen by Parishes, in the month of March or 
April annually ; and also the transaction of any other business that may be 
legally transacted in Parish meetings. 

In the House of Representatives, June 12, 1794. This bill having had three 
several readings, passed to be enacted. Edward H. Robbins, Speaker. 

In Senate, June 13, 1794. This bill having had two several readings, passed 
to be enacted. Samuel Phillips, President. 

June 14, 1794. By the Governor Approved. Sam*l Adams. 

A true copy. Attest : John Avery, Jun*r, Secretary. 

On April 9, 1794, the voters instructed the selectmen to peti- 
tion the Legislature to pass an act incorporating the town into 
three parishes ; this was done. With the approval of that act, 
the territorial parish of Hallowell was extinguished, and the 
subsequent ecclesiastical history of the town is comprised in the 
separate histories of the several parishes. 

Although the practising lawyer was a rare personage in the 
small community one hundred years ago, the legal forms were 
not neglected by the practical and matter-of-fact yeomen in 
their various business transactions ; many of the deeds and bills 
of sale and other common instruments are admirable for their 
directness, and simplicity ; and while they are sometimes prolix 
in words and sentences they are seldom too much so for absolute 
technical sufficiency. They were modelled after the forms used 
in the mother country, and being printed in the books of practice 



Additional 

Benjamin 

Jacob 

Wm. 

Moses 

Hartson 

Samnel 

Reuben 

Calvin 

John 

William 

Samnel 



taxpayers f 1792. 

Baxter, 

Bradbnry, 

Briggs, jr., 

Carr, 

Conv, 

Coiiliard, 

Cowen, 

Davenport, 

Davis, 

HodgkinSj jr., 

Howard, jr.. 



Ezra 

James 

James 

Peter 

John 

Joseph 

James 

Amos 

William 

Elisha 

Oliver 



Ingraham, 


Charles 


Renoff, 


Ingraham, 


John 


Shepard, 2d, 


Kenney, 


James 


Smith, 


Kenney, 


Edward 


Springer, jr.. 


L. Jnness, 


Zachariah 


Springer, 


Metcalf, 


William 


Swanton, 


Norris, 


John 


Sylvester, 


Partridge, 


Ebenezer 


Vose, 


Pitt, 


Joseph 
Noah 


White, 


Prescott, 


Woodward, jr. 


Randall. 







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required no professional lawyer to adapt them to the various 
offices they were needed to perform. Esquires were usually 
fair penman and competent scriveners, and prepared the docu- 
ments which their fellow-citizens publicly acknowledged before 
them- A deed of a pew in the town's meeting-house was an 
instrument that well illustrates the gravity and punctilious care 
with which even the minor business acts of the fathers of the 
town were attended. 



Derd of Pew in The Town Meeting House, to Lewis Hamlbn. 
Know all men by these Presents : That whereas, WiUiam Howard, and Henry 
Sewall, Esquires, and Ellas Craig, gentleman, all of HallowcU, in the county 
of Lincoln, at a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the said town of Hallo well, 
qualified to vote in town affairs, held at the meeting-house in said town on the 
fourteenth day of October, Anno Domini f 798, were appointed a committee to 
make sale at public auction ofthe pew-ground in said meeting-house, agreeably 
to the plan thereof made by Henry Sewall, William Howard and Joseph North, 
Esquires, and accepteil by said town upon the terms and conditions expressed 
in the vote of the said inhabitants at their said meeting, and authorized to pass 
deeds of conveyance in behalf of said town, to the purchasers of such pew- 



Additional 


taxpayers, 1797 


George 


Andros, jr., 


Ezra 


Allen, 


Constant 


Abbot, 


Cornelius 


Atkins, 


Nathaniel 


Bodwell, 


James 


Bridge, Sr., 


Nathan 


»e'rt. 


Anthony 


Eno6 


Briggs, 


Nathan 


Burgess, 


Thomas 


Bowman, 


George 


Brooks, 


John 


Brooks, 


Humphrey 


Bailey, 


Thomas 


Bond, 


Samnel 


Butterfield, 


William 


Bell, 


Heman 


Black, 


John 


Chamberlain, 


WiUiam 


Chamberiain, 


Jesse 


Clark, 


Samuel 


Coleman, 


Nathaniel 


Cnmmings, 


Samuel 


Cnmmings, jr. 


James 


Cyphers, 


John 


Cyphers, 


Isaac 


Cowan, 


Levi 


Cowan, 


Samuel C. 


Churchill, 


Isaac 


Carter, 


Lemuel 


Davenport, 


Thomas 


Dickman, 


Charles 


Dingley, 


James 


Button. 



Peter 

WUliam 

John 

Robert 

Thomas 

Bunker 

Yoseft 

James 

Charles 

Lewis 

Daniel 

David 

Ebenezer 

Matthew 

Samuel 

Seth 

John 

Moses 

Robart 

Nathaniel 

Peter 

Alpheus 

Barnabas 

Switliff 

William 

Elisha 

Magnus 

Jesse 

Gershom 

Joseph 

Thomas 

James 

John 

Levi 



Edes, 

EUis, 

Freeman, 

Fletcher, 2d, 

Fletcher, 

Farwell, 

Gaw, 

Gilley, 

Gill, 

Hamlen, 

Hartford, 

Harding, 

Hewins, 

Hayward, 

Hovev, 

HalloweU, 

Hamilton, 

Ingraham, 

Kennedy, jr., 

Kimball, 

Kitteridge, 

Lyon, 

Lambard, 

Lawson, 

McMaster, 

Mosher, 

Mason, 

Maitin, 

North, 

North, jr., 

Nowland, 

Page, jr.. 

Page, 

Page. 



Stephen 

Ziba 

Shuball 

Ebenezer 

Moses 

Josiah 

Phineas 

Simeon 

Moses 

Otis 

John 

Robert 

John 

Isaac 

Widow 

Stanley & 

William 

Samuel 

Samuel 

James 

Judah 

Aaron 

David 

Samuel 

WiUiam 

Asa 

James 

Church 

Timothy 

Joshua 

Shnbael 

Benjamin 

Jeremiah 

Jonas 



Pettengill, 

Pitts, 

Pillsbury, 

Pollard, 

Parker, 

Paine, 

Paine, jr.. 

Partridge, 

Pierce, 

Phinney, 

Reynolds, 

Rockwood, 

Savage, 3d, 

Savage, 

Stone, 

Stodder, 

Shaw, 

Springer, 

Saunders, 

Smith, 

Seekins, 

Thomas, 

Titcomb, Sr. 

Thompson, 

Wright, 

Wall, 

Williams, 

Woodward, 

Walton, 

Wixon, 

Whitwell, 

Walker, 

Warren. 



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158 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



ground ; And whereas, the committee aforesaid conformably to the vote of the 
said Inhabitants passed at their said meeting did on the first Monday In Nov- 
ember Anno Domini 1793, at the meeting-hoase aforesaid, sell at public auction 
to Lewis Hamlen, of said Hallowell, the pew-ground for one pew in said 
meeting-house, numbered Forty-six, for the sum of three pounds eight shillings ; 
the-said Haralen being the highest bidder for said Pew; — Now know ye. that 
we, the committee aforesaid, in consideration of the premises and of the sum 
of money above mentioned to us in hand paid by the said Hamlen, the receipt 
where of we do hereby acknowledge, do hereby in behalf of said town, give, 
grant, sell and convey unto the said Hamlen the pew-ground in said meeting- 
house for one pew as above described and numbered as aforesaid Forty-six, 
agreeably to the plan above-mentioned, with the pew erected and to be erected 
thereon, and with the privileges and appurtenances to the same belonging. To 
have and to hold the same to him. the said Hamlen, his heirs and assigns 
forever. And we, the said Committee, do covenant and agree with the said 
Hamlen, his heirs and assigns, that we are fhlly authorized by the said Town 
of Hallowell to make sale of the premises as aforesaid ; and that in all things 
respecting the same we have proceeded agreeably to the directions of the said 
town and to the authority vested in us as aforesaid. In testimony whereof 
we have hereunto set our hands and seals the twentieth day of April, Anno 
Domini 1796. William Howard (seal). 

Signed, sealed and delivered Henry Sbwall (seal), 

in presence of Elias Craiq (seal). 

S. Howard, Jr. 
P. T. Vose. 

Lincoln, ss. August 26th, 1797. Then the above named William Howard, 
Henry Sewall and Elias Craig, appeared and acknowledged the above instru- 
ment to be their ft'ee act and deed. 

Before me, Joseph North, Justice Peace. 

Aagnsta. Received August 26th, 1797, and entered with the Records of Deed8 
of Pews, in a Book for that purpose, provided and kept in this office, page 79. 
Attest : H. Sewall, Town Clerk. 

Additional 

Ezra 

Lewis 

Augnstng 

Samuel 

Ebenezer 

Henry 

Samuel 

William 

Ephraim 

Isaac 

Jepheth 

Jonathan 

Hannah 

Amos 

Samuel 

Jonathan 

James 

Gideon 

Jonas 

Joseph 



taxpayers, 1806 


', 


Alien, 


Abiel 


AUen, 


Guy 


Alden, 


Perez 


Arnold, 


Lot 


Buzzel, 


Ziba 


Badcock, 


Samuel 


Badoock, 3d, 


Daniel 


Badcock, 


James 


Ballard, jr., 


John(Capt) 


Beal, 


Joshua 


Beal, 


Joshua 


Bennet, 


Josiah 


Blackman, 


Caleb 


Bond, 


Samuel 


Bond, 


Keuel 


Bond, 


Ephraim 
Edward 


Balton, 2d, 


Brayley, 


John 


Brooks, 


James 


Burton. 


John 



Gouild, 


Walton 


Powers 


Green, 


Jotham S. 


Patten, 


Hamlen, 


Warren 


Preston, 


Hamlen, 
Hall, 


Philip W. 
John 


Peck, 
Pickford, 


Handoock, 


Thomas 


Kairdon, 


Hawes, 


Charles 


Ranlet, 


Hartford, 


Daniel 


Kanlet, 


HartweU, 


William 


Robinson, 


Heath, 


Salmon 


Rockwood, 


Heath, Jr., 


Enoch 


Rowell, 


Heath 


Daniel 


Robinson, 


Heath, 


David 


Sanford, 


Howard, 


James 


Sanders, 


Howard, 


Jacob 


Sanders, 


Howard, 


Daniel 


Savage, 


Jones, 


Isaac 


Savage, jr., 


Kennedy, 


Joel 


Savage, 


Kennedy, 


George 


Shaw, 


KimbaU. 


John 


Shaw, 3d. 



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CHAPTER YII. 

THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 

It is a great matter to lay the foundations of a town so as to 
enlarge the prosperity of the community and permanently con- 
serve the public welfare. There was more than rhetoric in the 
speech of Themistocles, who, at a banquet, w^hen asked to play 
the lute, replied that he could not fiddle, but he could make a 
small town to become a great city. The founders of Augusta 
were strong and masculine men of action whose gifts ran not to 
fiddling or effeminacy, but to worldly and substantial affairs 
and the building of an enduring town. The following is the 
petition which they presented to the legislature. 

Petition for thk Division op Hallowell. 

To the Honorable Senate and the Honorable House of Representatives in 
General Court assembled. 

The Petition of the subscribers, Inhabitants of the Town of Hallowell in the 
County of Lincoln, humbly sheweth : 

That a division of this Town Is contemplated and earnestly wished for by 
yoar petitioners, a measure they believe calculated to promote the interest, 
the peace, and the general welfare of the Town. This opinion is grounded on 
the following reasons, which they beg leave to submit to the candour and wis- 
dom of the Legislature. 

1. The extent of territory comprehended within the limits of this Town is 
Ihlly sufficient for two or three towns, and was we presume designed at the 
time of its incorporation to be divided whenever the inhabitants became suffi- 
ciently numerous. 

2. The distance the Inhabitants have to travel to attend Town meetings, 
and to transact other Town business has ttom the Increased population be- 
come inconvenient, and they believe the present number of Inhabitants suffi- 
cient to form two Towns. 

3. Your petitioners urge as an important reason the situation of the two Vil- 
lages which compose two distinct compact settlements in the Town, about two 
miles and a half distant ft'om each other. These f^om their situation and 
natural advantages seem designated both by nature and art for the centres of 
two Towns. 



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160 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



And 4. There appearing no prospect that the Town can longer be har- 
moniously or beneficially united, so as to transact the necessary corporate busi- 
ness of the Town with that convenience and advantage to the Inhabitants as 
it could be done if a separation should take place ; 

They therefore respectfblly request the Honorable Legislature to take the 
premises into their wise consideration and pass an act dividing the Town of 
Hallowell into two Towns, and that the dividing line between them be the same 
line which now divides the South Parish ftrom the Middle Parish — to wit : Be- 
ginning on the east side of Cobbosseecontee Pond at the northwest comer of 
the mile lot number twenty-three ; thence running east southeast in the north 
line of said lot to Kennebeck River ; thence easterly across said River to the 
northwest corner of lot number eighteen, being the same lot on which Jona- 
than Davenport now lives ; thence east southeast to the eastern bounds of 
said Town: also it is the farther request of your petitioners that all those 
who have Joined themselves to either of the Parishes in said Town other than 
that in which they live for the purpose of attending public worship conform- 



Additional 

Icbabod 

Ezra 

Bsnjamin 

Clement 

Joseph 

Stephen 

Samael F. 

Stephen 

Bemsiey 

Lnther 

Bandel 

Joel 

Samnel 

Jason 

Abisha 

David 

David 

William 

Laarance 

Widow C. 

John 

Miai 

Charles 

John 

Ephralm 

John 

Josiah 

Mary 

Parker 

Samuel 

James 

Seth J. 

Habijah W 

Aaron 

Jonathan 

John 

Joshaa 

Thomas E. 

Isaiah 

Samuel 

Deannit 

Timothy 

Beniamin 



taxpayers f 1805 1 — concluded. 



Brownel. 

Bradford, 

Bnrbank, 

Bnnker, 

Banker, 

Banker, 

Brown, 

Caldwell, 

Caldwell, 

Church, 

Church, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Cony, 

Cowen, jr., 

Craig, 

Cutler, 

Cyphers, 

Cyphers, 

Gardner, 

Davis, 

Davis, 

Dingley, 

Dickson, 

Datton, 

Eveleth, 

McFarland, 

Farwell, 

Fletcher, 

Floyd, 

FoUett, 

Foster, 

Fuller, 

Foster, 

Flanders, 

Ga^e, 

Gage, 

Gage, 

Gardner, 

GUI, 

Gillev, 

Goldthwait, 

Gilman. 



John 

Moses 

Hazen 

John 

Isaac 

Theophilas 

Arthur 

Squier 

Elon 

John 

Ephraim 

Isaac 

Daniel 

Jacob 

Elisha 

Daniel 

Samael 

George 

Abraham 

Joseph 

Peter 

James 

Samnel 

James 

Stephen 

Asa 

Benjamin 

Nathaniel 

Benjamin 

Elisha 

Thomas 

John 

Jonathan 

Howard 

Ansel 

Thomas 

John 

Walter 

Asa 

Benjamin 

Andrew 

Jedediah 

James 



KimbaU,2d, 


Ebenezer 


Smith, 


Kellev, 
Kimbel, 


WiUiam 


Spragae, jr., 
Sprague, 


John 


Lawson, 


John 


Springer, 


Lawson, 


Edward 


Springer, 2d, 


Ladd, 


David 


Smiley, . 


Lithgow, 


Joseph 


Stackpole, jr., 


Lyon, 


Nahum 


Stackpole, 


Lyon, 


Eiias 


Stackpole, 


Linscot, 


Robert 


Stackpole, 


lieighton, 


John 


Soule, jr., 


Mason, 


William 


Swanton, 


McMaster, 


Robart 


Smart, 


Miller, 


Amos 


StUson, 


Mosher, 


Joseph 


Sanders, 


Moody, 


Robert 


Smith, 


Moody, 


WUiiam 


Talcot, 


Murfe, 


Josiah 


Thomson, 


Nason, 


Staphen 


Toby, 


North, 


Samael 


Tolman, jr., 


Noice, 


Jeremiah 


Tolman, 


North, 


Ebanezer 


Towne, 


Page, 


Paul 


Tibbitto, 


Pago, jr., 


Peter T. 


Vose, 


Page, 


Edward 


Vinton, 


Page, 


David 


Wall, jr., 


Page, 


Nathan 


Weston, 


Paine, 


Benjamin 


WhitweU, 


Paine, 


John 


Wheeler, 


Parker, 


HartweU 


Williams, 


Parker, 


Reael 


Williams, 


Partr.dge, 


Charles 


Williams, 


Perkins, 
Pettsngill, 


Robert 


Williams, 


James 


Williams, 


Pettengill, 


James 


Wiggins, 


Pitti, 
Pinkham, 


Israel 


Woodward, 


Lemuel 


Woodward, 


Pinkham, 


Daniel 


Woodward, 


Pierc3, 


Thomas 


Wood. 


Piper, 


Thomas 


Woodbrldge, 


Plumer, 


Daan 


Wyman, 
Wingate. 


Preble, 


Frederick 


Puxrington. 







\ 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



161 



ably to the *'Act dividing the Town of Hallowell into three Parishes," shall 
have liberty to continue to the Parish or Society to which they have Joined 
themselves as aforesaid, so long as they may choose and no longer ; and shall 
also be liable both for their polls and estates to be taxed to the same towards 
the support of public worship and nowhere else while they continue to said 
society as aforesaid ; 

And whereas it is contemplated that the Inhabitants of the North Parish in 
Hallowell, or that part thereof lying on the west side of the river may here- 
after wish to be incorporated into a distinct Town, such of your petitioners 
as belong to the other Parishes of said Town hereby pledge themselves that 
whenever the said North Parish or that part thereof lying on the west side of 
the river shall determine the measure to be expedient they will make no op- 
position thereto. 

And also your petitioners pray that a fair and equitable regard may be had 
to the debts and credits of the Town and a just proportion thereof set to each 
Town respectively. And they as in duty bound do pray. 

Hallowell, 12 May, 1791. 



Abisha Co wen, 
James Springer, 
Simeon Paine, 
Stutley Springer, 
Edward Springer, 
Wm. Sprage, 
Jonti. Ballard, 
Ephra. Cowan, 
Daniel Savage, 
William Swanton, 
Charles Clark, 
Isaac Savage, 



Moses Pollard, 
Benjamin Wade, 
Eliphalet Robbins, 
Enos Briggs, 
Robert Kennedy, Jun*r, 
Aaron Cross, 
Joshua Walton, Jun*r, 
Thomas Dinsmor, 
Joseph Foster, 
Job Springer, 
James Sanders, Jr., 
John Chamberlain, 



John GlUej.test. J. Savage, Wm. Pitt, 



Asa Mason, 
Simeon Paine, Junior, 
Nathaniel Tyler, 
Isaac Savage, 
Joseph North, 
Matthew Hay ward, 
Daniel Cony, 
Seth Williams, 
Beriah Ingraham, 
James Barton, 
Nathaniel Floyd, 
David Thomas, 
Abraham Well man, 
George Read, 
Asa Williams, 
Joslah Blackman, 
Amos Partridge, 

11 



Nath'l Thwing, 
Cyrus Ballard, 
Moses Cass, 
Ebenezer Hewins, 
John Morrill, 
N. Tilton, 
Samuel Comings, 
Alpheus Lyon, 
William Briggs, 
James Page, Jun*r, 
Bena. Follet, 
Shubael Wikson, 
Isaac Harding, 
Levi Page, 

Samuel Comings, Jun., 
Aaron Page, 
Nathaniel Cumlngs, 



Samuel Coney, 
Wm. Brooks, 
Sam'l Shaw, 
Benjamin Pettingill, 
William Stodder, 
William Usher, 
Edward Savage, 
James Savage, 
Edward Savage, Jun., 
Samuel Badcock, 
Thomas Nowlen, 
Jonathan Nowlen, 
Otis Pierce, 
Joseph Stackpole, 
Wm. Hewins, 
Robert Deniston, 
James Gilley, 
Samuel Tolman, 
Jesse Clark, 
Ziba Pettingill, 
Phinehas Allen, 
William Howard, Jun., 
Samuel Cony, 2d, 
Lemuel Davenport, 
Nath'l Kimball, 
James Child, 
John Abbott, 
Robert Abbott, 
Elisha Mosher, 
Robert Fletcher, 2d, 



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162 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



Petitioners for a New Town,- 
Greorge Nicols, Isaac Lincoln, 



Savage Bolton, 
Bunker Far well, 
John Shaw, 
Jas. Bridge, 
George Crosby, 
Peter T. Vose, 
Ellas Craig, 
Theos. Haralen, 
Isaac Carter, . 
Lewis Hamlen, 
Sam*l Colinan, 
G. North, 
Ezra Smith, 
James Page, 
Peter Kittredge, 
Isaac Savage, 
Timothy Page, 
Stephen Page, 
Enoch White, 
Barnabas Lambard, 
Daniel Foster, 
Shubael Pitts, 
Ebenezer Pillsbury. 



Asa Wright, 
Bartholomew Wells, 
Charles Dingley, 
George Bruce, ^ 

John Finney, 
William Howard, [2d] 
Jereh. Ingraham, 
Samuel Nurs, 
John Pedrick, 
Samuel Butterfleld, 
Thomas Reardon, 
William McMaster, 
Abraham Page, 
Solomon Cnmlngs, 
David Wall, Jr., 
Charles Gill, 
William Howard, 
Samuel Howard, 
Brian Fletcher, 
Peter Parker. 
David Fletcher, 
Humphrey Bailey, 
Amos Pollard. 



concluded. 

William Bell. 
James Dickman, 
James Black, 
William Smith, 
John Hamilton, 
Ezra Ingraham, 
Jeremiah Badcock, 
John Badcock, 
Samnel Badcock, Jr., 
Samuel Badcock, Sd, 
Suitliff Lawson, 
Moses Ingraham, 
Samuel Church, 
David McNight, 
Ezekiel Page, 
Wm. Thomas, 
John Nowlen, 
S. H. Ward, jr., 
Robert Fletcher, 
Thomas Fletcher, 
Joseph North, Jr., 
Israel Cowan, 
Eliphalet Pierce. 



In due time the town was notified from Boston of the pendency 
of the petition, and a town-meeting was warned for November 
7th, to consider the sulyect. The Hook party was in the as- 
cendency at this meeting also ; and it was voted to request the 
General Court to defer action on the subject "until the town 



Additionai 


taxpayers, 1706. 


Jesse 


Babcock, 


Cyras 


Eliab 


Bell, 


WiUiam 


John 


Brigffs, 


James 


Benjamin 


Barges, 


Betsey 


Jedediah 


Cowen, 


Robert 


Midian 


Cowen, 


William 


William 


Crosby, 


Joseph 


Lemuel 


Crehoar, 


John 


Isaac 


Cottle, 


Samuel 


Reubsn 


Dnran, 


Asa 


Willard 


Drake, 


Kendel 


Pitt 


Dillingham, 


Newel 


Caleb 


Dudley, 


Jason 


Benjamin 


Edes, 


John 


Marshel 


Edson, 


John 


Levi 


Foye, 


Samuel 


James 


Foye, 


Oliver 


Otis 


Follett, 


John 


Joseph 


Furbush, 


Jabez 


Tristram 


Folsom. 


David 



Guild, 

Onptill. 

Howard, 

Howard, 

Howard, 

Howard, 2d, 

Haikell, 

Jones, 2d, 

Liver more, 

Mason, 

Nichols, 

Page, 

Pierce, 

Pierce, 

Pinkham, jr., 

Prince, 

Pollard, 

Roberts, 

Rollins, 

Rollins. 



Isaac 

Roland 

John 

Peter 

William 

William 

Stephen 

Jones 

Thomas W. 

Thomas P. 

Thomas 

Samuel 

John 

Solomon 

Charles 

William 

Samuel 

Bancroft 

Nicholas 

Nahnm 



Savage, 3d, 

Smith, 

Soule, 

Sprague, 

Sterns, 

Stone, 

Smith, 

Smith, 

Smith, 

Studson, 

Sewall, 

Tolman, 

Tibbitts, 

Vose, 

Vose, 

Wall, 

Webber, 

Williams, 

Wiggins, 

Wood. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 163 

can have an opportunity to agree thereon/'^ This request was 
wholly disregarded. The petition bearing the autographs of one 
hundred and sixty-one honorable citizens, supported by the 
unique personality and eloquence of Daniel Cony, was more po- 
tential with the legislature than the collective voice of the inhab- 
itants in town meeting assembled. On the 20th day of Febru- 
ary, 1797, an act was pa^^sed incorpomting the Middle and North 
parishes into a new town. The name chosen — probably by 
Daniel Cony, — was in honor of Lord Harrington, a courtier and 
minister of George II. 

Act of Incorporation of Harrington. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

An act to divide the town of Hallo well, in the county of Lincoln, into two 
towns, and to incorporate the northerly part thereof into a town by the name 
of Harrington. 

Sect. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, That the town of 
Hallowell, in the county of Lincoln, be, and the same hereby is divided into 
two separate and distinct towns ; and the northerly part thereof, bounded as 
follows, viz., beginning at the northwest comer of the said town of Hallo- 
well, thence running easterly on the north boundary line thereof to the north- 
east comer of the same town, thence running southerly on the east boundary 
line thereof to the line dividiag the middle and south parishes in said Hallo- 
well, thence running westerly on the line dividing said parishes until it 
strikes the public road which leads troia said south parish to Winthrop, 
thence running north northeast to the northerly line of lot number two in the 
second range of lots west of Kennebec river, thence running west northwest 
to the northwest comer of lot number three in the third range, thence mnning 
northwesterly a straight course to the southeast corner of lot number one 
hundred and two, thence running west northwest to the southwest corner of 
lot number one hundred and one, thence running northerly on the westerly 
side of the last mentioned lot to the northwest comer of the same, thence 
running west northwest to the westerly boundary line of said Hallowell, thence 
running northerly on the westerly line of said Hallowell to the bounds first 
mentioned, together with the inhabitants thereon, and also Nathaniel Floyd 
with his estate, be, and the same hereby are. Incorporated into a dbtlnct and 
separate town by the name of Harrington, with all the powers, privileges, and 
Immnnlties which other towns within this Commonwealth do or may by law 
enjoy. • 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That until the new general valuation shall 
be taken the State taxes which may be required of said town shall be levied 
on and paid In equal moieties by said towns of Hallowell and Harrington. 

1 Town record, November 7, 1796. 



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164 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That the inhabitants of the said town of 
Harrington shall pay all the arrears of taxes which have been assessed upon . 
them, together with an equal proportion of all debts now due and owing ftrora 
the said town of Hallowell, and shall be entitled to rec^ve an equal propor- 
tion of all debts and moneys now due and owing to the said town of Hallo- 
well. And said towns respectively shall be entitled to an equal proportion of 
a lot of land voted by the proprietors of the Kennebec purchase to the town 
of Hallowell for the use of the ministry in said town. Provided always, that 
nothing in this act contained shall extend or be construed to extend to deprive 
either of said towns of their right to a just proportion of all public property 
belonging to said towns which by law they were entitled to at the time of the 
passing of this act. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted. That the Inhabitants of the said towns of 
Hallowell and Harrington shall be chargeable in equal proportions with the 
expense of supporting the poor which at the time of passing this act were the 
proper charge of the town of Hallowell. 

Sect. 5. Be it enacted. That nothing in this act contained shall extend or 
be construed to extend to deprive any of the inhabitants of either of said 



Additional taxpayers ^ 1 81 0. 

ElizAeth AndroB, 

Brackett Andres, 

Thomas Austen, 

Isaac Babcock, 

Abel Babcock, 

John Bryant, 

Asael Brick, 

Luke Barton, 

Winslow Borden, 

Samuel Bngbee, jr., 

Henry B. Blackman, 

Asa Burbank, 

Thomas Beck, 

Elijah Bolton, 

Savage Bolton, 

James Bolton, 3d, 

Daniel Caldwell, 

G. C. Child, 

David Church, 

Samuel Cnmming8,3d, 

John Cony, 

Jonathan Cross, 

Samnel Cross, 

William Cross, 

Randal Clark, 

Isaac Cowen, jr., 

John Conch, 

Oliver Child, 

Jessee Child, 

Ichabod Chad wick, 

Freeman Crommitt, 

Asa Davis, 

Eben Dutch, 

Joel R. Ellis, 

David Fletcher, jr., 

Foxwell Fletcher, 

Henry W. Fuller, 

Benjamin Field, 

William Fellows, 

Benjamin Gardner, 

Timothy Goldthwait, jr, 



John H. 


Hartwell, 


Solomon 


Rnfns 


HaskeU, 


John 


John 


Haakins, 


Jessee 


Harlow 


Harris, 


John 


Levi 


Hoyt, 


John 


Stephen 
Andrew 


HoVt 


Eliab 


Haslett, 


John * 


Jonathan H.Hill. 


Robert 


Luther 


Ingraham, 


Gideon 


Stephen 


Jewett, 


Samuel 


Jeremiah 


Jackson, 


Tillinghast 


Hosiah 


Kingman, 


Alpheid D. 


Renben 


Kidder, 


Brian 


Abraham C 


I.Lane, 


Bradbury C 


Elijah 


Lawson, 


Asael 


Joseph 


Ladd, 


Daniel 


John 


Lancaster, 


John 


John 


Marshall, 


James 


Elias 


Miller, 


Dudley 


Peter 


Moores, 


Stephen 


Benjamin 


Morrell, 


Moody 


Bartholomew Nason. 


John 


James F. 


Norris, 


Caleb 


John 


North, 


Thatcher 


Elaxander 


Orrick, 
Page, 2d, 


Josiah H. 


Timothy 


Eliza P. 


Levi 


IT^'' 


Robert C. 


Brackett 


Joseph 


Benjamin 


Palmer, 


Nathan 


Robert 


Pratt, 


Seth 


Samuel 


Patterson, 


EbenezerB. 


Abraham 


Pinkham, 


Theodore 


John 


Potter, 


Joseph 


Jonathan 


Prescot, 


Joseph 


Job 


Randel, 


John 


George 


Read, jr.. 


John 


Elihu 


Robinson, 


David 


George 


Richardson. 


Oliver 


DeLafayette Rowel, 


Nathan 


Benjamin 


Rossi, 


James 


Benjamin 


Randal. 





Richards, 

Read, 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Shaw, 2d, 

Shaw, jr., 

Smith, 

Smart, 

Springer, 

Springer, 

Springer, 
. Sprague, 

Stackpole, 
I. Shaw, 
Savage, 

Stone, 

Scribner, 

Snow, 

Swain, 

Spear, 

Thuriow, 

Temple, 

Trasic, 

Tucker, 

Vose, 

Vose, 

Vose, 

Wales, 

Weston, jr., 

Williams, jr., 
. Williams, 

Wilson, 

Woodward, 

Wingate, 

Worth, 

Ward, 

Wangh, 

Wyman, 

Wood, 

Wade. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



165 



towns of Hallowell and Harrington who have taken the benefit of an act di- 
viding the town of Hallowell into three parishes, made and passed the four- 
teenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and 
ninety-four, of any rights, privileges or immunities which they now enjoy by 
force of the same act. 

And whereas, the Court of Common Pleas, Courts of General Sessions of the 
Peace and Supreme Judicial Courts, have heretofore been holden in that 
part of the town of Hallowell which is hereby incorporated ; and whereas the 
general convenience of the county and the accommodations of said courts 
may hereafter require their removal to the said town of Hallowell ; 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted, That the several courts aforesaid shall con- 
tinue to be holden in the said town of Harrington until further order of the 
legislature; and all writs, precepts and judicial proceedings whatever which 
are or may be returnable to the courts aforesaid, shall be accepted, adjudged 
and considered by said courts in said town ot Harrington, any law to the con- 
trary notwithstanding. 

Sect. 7. Be it Airther enacted. That William Brooks, Esq., be and he is 
hereby, empowered to issue his warrant, directed to some principal inhabi- 
tant of the said town of Harrington, requiring him to warn the inhabitants 
of the said town of Harrington qualified to vote In town affairs to assemble 
at some suitable time and place in said town, to choose all such town officers 
as towns are by law authorized to choose, in the months of March and April 
annually, and to transact such other matters and things as may be necessary 
and lawful at such meeting. 

And, whereas, In consequence of the aforesaid division there will remain 
but one selectman In said town of Hallowell ; 

Sect. 8. Be It ftirther enacted by the authority aforesaid. That Na- 
thaniel Drummer, Esq., the selectman remaining within said town be, and he 
is hereby vested with all the power which a majority of the said selectmen 
would have had so far as relates to the calling the annual meeting thereof In 
March or April next. 

In House of Representatives, February 20, 1797. This bill having had three 
several readings, passed to be enacted. Edward H. Bobbins, Speaker. 



Additional taxpayers, 1811. 


Cyrus 


Alden, 


Isaac 


Silas 


Bates, 


Martin 


Zenas 


Black, 


William 


Nathaniel 


Brown, 


Jesse 


Calvin 


Burden, 


J. M. 


Thomas 


Burden, 


Amasa 


John 


Britt, 


Jonathan 


Jacob 


Britt, 


John 


Benjamin 


Brown, 


Levi 


Jonas 


Carter, 


Jonathan 


Enoch 


Child, 


Stephen 


James 


Craig, 


Benjamin 
Nathaniel 


William 


Crosby, 2d, 


Benjamin 


Chase, 


Samuel 


Gale 


Cole, 


William B 


Samnel 


Can, 


James 


Francis 


Delano, 


David 


Francis 


Jacob 


Peter 


EdeB,jr., 


Samuel 



Farwell, 


John 


Mori^an 


Gill, 


Webster 


Morf^an, 


Goldthwait, 


Samuel 


Norcross, 


Gordon, 


William 


Norcross, 


Harford, 


John 


Niles, 


Hewins, 


Moses 


Partridge, 


Havnes, 


Joseph 
David R. 


Perkins, 


Hart, 


Savage, 


Hoyt, jr., 


Joshua 


Smith, 


Hawes, 


William A 


Springer, 


Hawes, 


Eleazer 


Tyler, 


Hodges, 


Solomon 


Thayer, 


Hill, 


Jeremiah 


Vose, 


Jones, 


Samuel 


Williams, 


Johnson, 


Lazarus 


White, 


Keaton, 


Alvin 


Wade, 


Kidder, 


Daniel 


Waldron, 


Lovejoy, 


Andrew 


Wentworth, 


Marshal, 


Stephen 


Wood. 



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166 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

In Senate, February 20, 1797. This bill having had two several readings, 
passed to be enacted. Samuel Phillips, President. 

February 20, 1797. By the Grovernor approved. Samuel Adams. 

The imperialistic method of the fort villagers in procuring the 
separation, and the haughty ignoring of the wishes of the Hook 
people as a party deeply interested, laid the foundation of a petty 
enmity between the Fort and Hook which descended to the next 
generation and survived in the form of unfriendly pranks and 
sometimes rows between the neighboring youth long after the 
precise origin of the feud had faded from popular recollection. 

The first annual town meeting of the free-holdei*s and other in- 
habitants of the town of Harrington, qualified to vote in town 
affairs (that is to say, all who paid to one single tax beside the 
poll or polls a sum equal to two-thirds of a single poll-tax,) was 
held conformably to the notification by warrant from William 
Brooks (named for that service in the act of incorporation) at the 
Court-house on the 3d day of April, 1797. 

April 3, 1797. Chose Daniel Cony, Esq., moderator. Town Clerk, Heniy 
Sewall. Treasurer, William Howard.' Selectmen and Assessors : Elias Craig, 
Reth Williams, Beriah Ingrabam. Town Ageht, James Bridge. Fence view- 
ers : Barnabas Lambard, Matthew Hayward ; Surveyors of Highways : David 
Wall, Jr., Benjamin Pettengill, Isaac Clark, Josiah Blackman, Anthony Bracket, 
James Child, Moses Cass, Thomas Densmore, Alpheus Lyon. Surveyors of 
Lumber: Henry Sewall, Samuel Colman, Amos Partridge, Theophilus Ham- 
en, Charles Gill, James Black, Barnabas Lambard, Elias Craig, Brian Fletcher, 
Beriah Ingraham, Simeon Paine, Ezra Ingraham, Isaac Lincoln, David Hart- 
ford, Moses Partridge. Tythingmen: Asa Williams, Ezra Ingraham, Benja- 
min Pettengill, Theophilus Hamlen. Sealers of Leather : Constant Abbot, 
Josiah Blackman. Measurers of Wood : Theophilus Hamlen, Seth Williams, 
James Child, Samuel Colman. Field-drivers : William Hewins, Moses Ingraham, 
Phineas Paine, Simeon Paine, Jr. Pound-keepers : William Usher, George 
Andros. Inspectors of Biick and Lime : Henry Sewall, Daniel Foster. Cullers 
of Hoops and Staves and packers of Beef and Fish : William Usher, Benjamin 
Wade, Theophilus Hamlen, James Burton. Fish Committee : Shubael Pitts, 
Benjamin Wade, Moses Pollard, Asa Williams, Jeremiah Badcock, Charles 
Gill, Isaac Lincoln. Hog-reeves: John Brooks, David Wall, Jr., John Bad- 
cock, Moses Ingraham, Ziba Pettengill, Samuel Churchill, Isaac Carter, Isaac 
Savage, dd, James Saunders, William Bell, Daniel Hartford, John Page, Jesse 
Clark, George Thomas. Constables : Amos Partridge, Charles Gill. 

2 The town treasurer's book opened by tlon of the Kennebec Hirtorical Society. 
William Howard is preserved in the coUec- 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



167 



Voted that the collecting of the taxes be given to the lowest bidder, and 
Ezra Allen appearing and bidding off the same at Ave per cent on the amount 
which shall be duly committed, he was thereupon elected collector of taxes. 

Voted that the sum of $1260 be raised for the purpose of repairing highways 
the present year. 

Voted that the sum of $400 be raised for the support of schools the present 
year. 

Voted to raise the sum of $800 for discharging the debts, supporting the 
poor, and other necessary charges of the town. 

Voted that swine being yoked and ringed according to law, be permitted to 
go at large the present year. 

May 10, 1797. On an article in the warrant, ''Shall application be made to 
the Legislature for their consent to a separation of the District of Maine f^om 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and that the same may be erected into a 
state? Voted: For the separation, twenty-six; against it, thirty -eight. 

Voted that there be eight school districts in the town. 

Voted and chose the following named persons to be school committees in 
the several districts, viz: No. 1 (east side), Daniel Cony, Henry Sewall, Seth 
Williams. No. 2 (east-side), Isaac Clark, Joseph Stackpole, Robert Deniston. 
No. 3 (west side), Matthew Hay ward, Samuel Colman, Theophilus Hamlen. 
No. 4 (west side), John Shaw, Jr., Josiah Blackman, Simeon Paine. No. 5 
(west side) Moses Cass, Nathaniel Comings, Levi Page. No. 6 (west side), 
Alphens Lyon, Benjamin Follet, Squier Lyon. No. 7 (west side), Abraham 
Wellman, Jonas Dntton, Nathaniel Tyler. No. 8 (west side), James Savage, 
Eliab Shaw, Anthony Bracket. Chose a general committee to visit and inspect 
the schools : Rev. Daniel Stone, Daniel Cony, Henry Sewall, Samuel Colman, 
Seth Williams. 

iDstead of a becoming exhibition of pride and amiableness at 
the debut of her spirited and self-reliant daughter, the mother 
town of Hallowell turned the cold shoulder and petulantly called 
the newly enfranchised member of the family of the Common- 

Additional taxpayers, 1812 • 

Robinson, 

Richards, 

Sewall, 

Sargent, 

Tobey, 

Tobey, 

Tolman,jr., 

Temple, jr.. 

Temple, 3d, 

Trask, 

Tibbets, 

Wentworth, 

"Warner, 

White, 

Wilson, 

Waldron, 

Wales. 



Ephraim 


Anderson, 


John 


Nathan 


Blackman, 


Oliver 


William 


Bolton, 


John S. 


Elisha 


Bolton, 


Henry 


Samuel 


Boman, 


Bartlett 


John 


Bond, 


Stephen 


WiUiam 


Branch, 


Darid 


Palmer 


Branch, 


Daniel 


Isaac 


Church, 


John 


Samnel 


Cumming8,2d, 


William 


Joseph 


Chandler, 


John 


Banker 


Carter, 


Samuel 


Joseph 


Denniston, 


Joseph 


Thomas 


Elmes, 


Andrew 


W^illiams 


Emmons, 


Daniel 


Joseph 


Field, 


Philip W 


John 


Fifield. 


Walter 


Benjamin CGoss. 


Luther 



Gardiner, 


Jesse 


Jones, 


Joseph 


Kimhall, 


Charles 


Kenney, 


Thomas 


Lancaster, 


Charles £ 


Longfellow, 


Ellis 


Maxwell, 


Sdmuel 


Marshal, 


John 


Means, 


John 


Mulliken, 


ZadocB. 


Magoon, 


Ephraim 


NorcroBS, jr.. 


James 


North, jr.. 


William 


McCausland, 


Thomas 


Page, 


Benjamin 


Peck, 


Ebenezer 


Powers, 


Benjamin 


Read. 





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168 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



wealth by the prosaic and suggestive uame of Herringtown. 
This whimsical corruption of the eminent name of Harrington 
which had been honored sixty-eight years before by being given 
to one of David Dunbar's transient towns at Pemaquid, was very 
irreverent toward the sober fathers of the new town ; and im- 
plied a reference which some of the local aristocracy did not 
like. The appellation particularly referred to Dr. Daniel Cony's 
connection with the shad and alewives fishery which his respected 
father had established upon his coming to Fort Western twenty 
years before. Both father and son followed profitably for sev- 
eral years the apostolic occupation of fishermen, when the 
river was the "meat tub" of the settlers, and they annually 
caught and cured at their fishing privileges along the shores be- 
tween Kennedy's brook and Howard's eddy, large quantities of 
the finny tribe. The son now had some time since retired from 
the business ; and, having abandoned the fishing net for the 
saddle-bags, and the cleaning knife for the surgeon's scalpel ; 
and being highly uplifted socially and influentially as a legisla- 
tor and as a prosperous agent of sundry Plymouth proprietors, 
he was a shining mark for the disgruntled wits of Hallowell. 
The Tocsin newspaper merrily echoed the plebian name of 
Herringtown in its weekly issues, to the haughty but silent ex- 
asperation of the dignified circle two miles and a half above. 
Dr. Cony had been conspicuously instrumental in procuring the 
incorporation of Harrington, and toward him was especially di- 
rected the pitiless stonn of shafts from the armory of the disap- 
pointed inhabitants of the neighboring village. The name of 



Additional taxpayers, 1813 » 



Nathaniel 

James 

Mathew 

Josiah 

Abner 

Enoch 

Otis 

Charles 

Joseph 

Otis 

Joseph 

Daniel 

John 

Nathaniel 



Andres, 

Barton, jr., 

fiutterfieid, 

Butterfield, 

Cottle, 

Child, jr., 

Cony, 

Clark, jr., 

Fov, 

Fuller, 

Fletcher, 

Hilton, jr., 

Hamlen, 

Hodgkins. 



William 


Haskell, 


Runnels 


Jones, 


Alpheas 


Lyon, jr.. 


Sewall 


Lomrfellow, 


Francis 


Mathews, 


SAmuel R. 


Nason, 


Mark 


Nason, 


Josiah 


Prescott, 


James 


Pa^e, 3d, 


Joieph 


Palmer, 


OfflnB. 


Palmer, 


Samuel 


Richards, 


Benjamin 


Swan, 


WUiam 


Small. 



John B. 

Stephen 

Jacob 

Joseph 

Dennis 

Abraham 

Enoch S. 

WUliam 

James 

Samuel 

Benjamin 

Isaac 



Soule, 

Sprinj?er, 

Saunders, 

Smith, 

Sullivan, 

Southard, 

Tappan, 

Thomas, 

Welch, 

WUtshire, 

White, 

Waters. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 169 

Harrington having thus been spoiled by travesty and ridicule, 
it was determined by the town to withdraw it for another. 

May 10, 1797. Voted that the selectmen prefer a petition to the general 
Court, in behalf of the town, respectAiIly requesting the Legislature to alter 
the name of this town, and instead of Harrington to give it the name of Au- 
gusta ; and that the representative of the town [Daniel Cony] and senator 
from the district be requested to aid in obtaining an act for that purpose. 

The selectmen, acting under the above definite instructions, 
stated to the legislature, "that for manj" reasons which operate 
in the minds of your petitioners they are desirous that the name 
of Harrington may be changed for the name of Augusta ;" and 
forbearing to give "a lengthy detail of reasons," they "presume 
on the indulgence of the legislature," and doubt not the favor 
they ask "will be readily granted." ^ Daniel Cony as a member 
of the legislature needed no new spur to stimulate him to pro- 
cure the speedy granting of the favor requested. 
The name Augusta substituted. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

An Act to alter the name of the town of Harrington In the County of Lin- 
coin, and to designate the parishes in said town. 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in Gen- 
eral Court assembled, and by the authority of the same. That the town of Har- 
rington in the county of Lincoln, shall hereafter be known and called by the 
name of Augusta, 

Section 2. Be it further enacted. That the parishes incorporated by the 
names of the Middle parish in Hallowell. and the North parish in Hallowell, 
shall hereafter be designated as follows ; viz : The aforesaid Middle parish 
shaU be known and called by the name of the South parish in Augusta, and 
the aforesaid North Parish shall be known and called by the name of the North 
parish in Augusta. (Approved June 9, 1797.) 

The substitute name of Augusta was probably chosen by Dr. 
Cony, but the reason of its selection has ever remained un- 
known ; the secret, if such it was, does not appear to have been 
shared with anybody else, and undoubtedly it is forever lost. 
Nathan Weston, a son-in-law of Dr. Cony, assumed, without 
mentioning his authority, that the name was derived from the 
second Roman emperor, but deprecatingly added "that the mem- 

* Selectmen's petition. Mass. Archives, Boston. 



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170 HISTORT OP AUGUSTA. 

ory of the patriot Harrington is better entitled to be cherished 
than that of Caesar Augustus." * If the name was borrowed 
directly of one of the Caesars it is not obvious why it was ap- 
plied in the feminine form. It is a more plausible conjecture 
that the name like that of Harrington was suggested by an early 
town on the seacoast of honorable memory but short duration, — 
ancient Augusta of the Pejepscot company at Small Point. It 
was euphonious and without sentimental objections, and (very 
desirable under the circumstances) could not be profanely 
travestied by unfriendly humorists. 

April 18, 1798. Voted and cbose Joseph North, James Bridge, and William 
Howard to co-operate with a committee of Haiioweil in adjusting the respect- 
ive demands of said towns for supporting the poor who are chargeable in equal 
proportions to said towns. Also to make a division of the debts and credits 
of the old town of Hallowell. 

May 7, ] 798. Added to the committee to visit and inspect schools : Joseph 
North, William Howard, William Brooks, James Bridge, Bei^amin Whitwell, 
Samuel Titcomb. 

August 13, 1798. Voted for the choice of a delegate to a county convention 
to be held at Hallowell on the 4th Tuesday of October next, for the purpose of 
considering the expediency of a division of the county of Lincoln, and to as- 
certain and agree upon the dividing line. Daniel Cony had thirty-three, who 
was chosen. Ephraim Ballard, moderator. 

Augusft 27, 1798. Voted to accept of the minutes of the road from George 
Andros* to Sidney in the route to Belgrade [the present Belgrade road, after- 
wards laid out by the county]. 

March 11, 1799. Voted and chose Ellas Craig, Theophilus Hamlen, Peter T. 
Vose, George Crosby, Samuel Howard, Jun., Samuel Cony, 2d, lire wards. 

Voted to raise ^QO to build one pound, to be constructed of woode% ma- 
terials, and thirty feet square; that said pound be erected on the western side 
of the gully near the jail, on the northern side of the road leading to Win- 
throp ;^ that Theophilus Humleu be a committee to superintend the building 
of the same. Chose Peter Kittredge, pound-keeper. 

May 6, 1799. Pursuant to a warrant f^om Joseph North, Daniel Cony and 
others, Esquires, Justices of the Peace, quorum unusj living in or near Au- 
gusta, the shire town of Kennebec county, for that purpose to the selectmen 
of Augusta aforesaid directed, the inhabitants brought in their written votes 
for a Register of Deeds for said county ; and the same being counted and 
sorted by Joseph North, Ellas Craig, and Berlah Ingraham, who were chosen 

4 Oration at the Centennial Celebration, present homestead lot of Fanny Anthony 
July 4, 1854, p. 14. at comer of Winthrop and Elm streets. It 

6 The location of the pound was on the afterwards became the Town-house lot. 



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THE TOWN or AUGUSTA. 171 

to sort the votes for the meettng, it appeared that the names of the persons 
voted for, and the namber of votes each person had were as follows, viz : 
For Henry Sewall, 80. For John Soule, 6. 

James Burton, 26. Daniel Cony, 3. 

Samael Colman, 20. Daniel Evans, 1. 

Samnel Howard, 18. Samuel Titcomb, 1. 

February 1, 1800. Chose Samuel Colman moderator. Voted to choose a 
committee of seven, to make arrangements for commemorating the death of 
Gfineral WdshingtoHj pursuant to the proclamation of the President of the 
United States [dated the 6th of January, recommending that memorial ser- 
vices be observed throus^hout the country on the 22d of February]. Voted 
that the committee aforesaid [Henry Sewall, Peter T. Vose, George Crosby, 
Samuel Colman, William Brooks, James Bridge, Bei^. Whitwell,] be directed 
to apply to some suitable person to deliver an oration on the 22d instant; and 
to make such further arrangements as in their opinion will best comport with 
the solemnity of the occasion.* 

March 10, 1800. Voted and chose James Bridge, moderator ; after which 
was read the law against cursing and swearing. Chose town officers. 

May 6, 1805. Voted that John and Joshua Gage be permitted to erect a 
wharf at the town landing ; . .the inhabitants of the town to have a right to 
land goods, &c., and ship them ft-om said wharf fi'ee of expense; . . at the 
expiration of ten years, if the inhabitants of the town find any inconvenience 
ft-om said wharfs being built, said John and Joshua Gage shall relinquish to 
said town, their privilege in said wharf by being paid the value of it at that 
time. (Recommended by John Davis, James Bridge, Samuel Titcomb, Joseph 
North, Nathan Weston, qommlttee). 

Voted to give a bounty of twenty -five cents on each croto of a year old, and 
half that sum on younger ones, the same being killed within this town within 
one year, and proof thereof made to the selectmen. 

December 18, 1806. Voted that a committee of seven be appointed to draw 
a remonstrance to the General Court against the erecting a bridge across 
Kennebec river at Swan island in Dresden ; and that Benjamin Whitwell, 
James Bridge, Samuel Cony, Henry Sewall, Samuel Howard, Peter T. Vose, 
and George Crosby, Esquires, be this committee. 

.\pril 6, 1807. Voted and chose James Bridge, Benjamin Whitwell, and 
Solomon Vose, Esquires, a committee to inquire into the claims of the town 
of Hallowell to the old meeting-house, and report. 

On the question : Shall the senators and representatives of the District of 
Maine, make application to the Legislature for their consent to a separation 
of the District of Maine ftom the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and that 
the same may be erected iuto a State? Votes were given in, sorted, counted, 
and record and declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, to wit : For 
the question, 46; against it, 120. 

March 7, 1808. Voted to accept the report of George Crosby, Samuel Tit- 
comb, George Read, Benjamin Whitwell, Noah Woodward, Lewis Hamlen and 

« See Obsequies of Washington, in Volume I of this History. 



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172 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



Beriah Ingrahara, a committee on the snbject of bnilding a powdcr-honse ; 
that such a house be built; that the sum of 9100 be raised for the purpose; 
and that George Crosby, Joshua Gage, and Peter T. Vose be a committee for 
carrying this vote into effect. 

August 20, 1803. At a meeting legally holden to take into consideration the 
expediency of petitioning the President of the United States to remove the 
embargo, Thomas Bowman, Esquire, being chosen moderator, a committee of 
nine was appointed to draft a petition, who after a short adjournment for the 
purpose, reported the following petition, which was unanimously accepted In 
town meeting, and the selectmen and town cleric directed to forward the same 
to the President of the United Skates [which was accordingly done.] 

Petition to the President. 

To the President of the United States. The Inhabitants of the town of 
Augusta, in legal town meeting assembled, respectfully represent: That in 
common with the other towns in this district, they have severely felt the em- 
barrassments and distress produced by the several acts of Congress laying an 
embargo on the navigation and commerce of the United States. That as good 
and peaceable citizens they have cheerfully submitted to these and all other 
laws of their government, ftom the conviction that their rulers are of their 
own choice, and are appointed to represent the different interests of the res- 
pective parts of the Union ; and however severely they might feel the pressure 
of laws which should to themselves produce partial evil, yet if productive of 
general benefit they would feel disposed to submit without complaint ; that to 



Additional taxpayers, 1616. 



WiUiam 


Allen, 


WUliam 


Fellows, 


Nathaniel 


AndroB, 


William 


Goodhue, 


Warren 


Andros, 


Jacob 


Groves, 


Samuel 


Andres, 


William 


Groves, 


Bobert 


Annibal, 


John 


Goldthwait, 


William E 


Barton, 


John 


Hartwell, 


Jacob 


Bassford, 


John 


Hovey, 


William 


Bridire. 


Mosos 


Johnson, 


DeLafayette Ballard, 


James 


Keaton, 


William E 


Babcock, 


Charles 


Keene, 


Ephraim 


Burgess, 


Ansel 


Kimball, 


Joseph B. 


Bridge, 


Asa 


Lawson, 


Nathaniel 


BodweU, 


Lydia 


Lewis, 


Andrew 


Blunt, 


Henry 


Lovejoy, 


Josiah 


Bradley, jr., 


Isaac 


Marshal, 


Freeman 


Brown, 


Samuel 


Norcross, 


Walter 


Bolton, 


Amos 


Nichols, 


Abraham 


Brackett, 


Milford P. 


Norton, 


Josiah 


Burgess, 


Thomas 


Norcross, 


Jesse 


Craig, 


Cvrus 


Osgood, 


Mary M. 


Cox, 


John C. R. 


Palmer, 


Isaiah 


Cottle, 
Church, jr., 


Walter W. 


Philbrick, 


Samuel 


Luke 


Perkins, 


MorriU 


Currier, 


David 


Page, 


WiUiam 


Dewey, 


John S. 


Page, 


Aaron 


Da>is, 


Marshal 


Preston, 


Bsnjamin 


Ddvis, 


Joseph 


Parker, 


Joseph 


Dillingham, 


William 


Pillsbury, 


Richard 


Dilling, 


Reuben 


Pinkham, 


Barnabas 


Eaton, 


Andrew 


Rogers, 


David 


Fletcher. 


George A. 


Rogers. 



Kilbum 

Nathaniel 

Thomas 

Moses 

Moses 

Elijah D. 

James 

William 

Eliiah 

Ephraim 

William 

Peleg 

Job 

Abisha 

Samuel 

Alvin 

Dudley 

Moses D. 

Moses 

David 

Ezra 

Gardiner 

Stephen 

Nathaniel 

Allen 

Amos 

Stephen 

Daniel 

Samuel 

George 



Robinson, 

Robinson, 

Rice, 

Safford, 

Safford, jr., 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Smith, 

Snell, 

Snow, 

SAvanton, 

Sprague, 

Springer, jr., 

Soule, 

Sinclair, 

Stone, 

Todd, 

Thompson, 

Yamum, 

Welsh, 

Waldron, 

Waters, 

Winslow, 

Willey, 

Wing, 

Wheeler, 

Weston, 

Williams, 

Whidden, 

Wyman. 



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THE TOWN OP AUGUSTA. 



173 



them, together with the inhabitants of the Eastern and Northern States, whose 
exports principally consist of perishable articles, the interdiction of foreign 
commerce, and consequently the necessity of keeping in their own hands the 
staple commodities of their country, has produced consequences highly injari- 
ous to their prosperity ; that they have been taught that the embargo was laid 
with an expectation that foreign powers, feeling the loss of commercial inter- 
course between themselves and the United States, would be induced, fVom re- 
gard to their own interest, to desist ft'om unjust and vexations spoliations on 
the property of our citizens. They respectftilly suggest their conviction that 
sufficient time has elapsed for the operation of the experiment and that the 
result has been unsuccessAil. That notwithstanding the belligerent powers 
have interdicted our commercial intercourse with certain European ports, and 
have restrained a part of the lucrative commerce recently enjoyed by the 
citizens of our country, yet that a sufficient portion of it remains to employ the 
industry of our merchants and the activity and enterprise of our mariners, and 
enable the one to avoid the evils of bankruptcy and the other the necessity of 
seeking subsistence for their families in the service of foreigners. And al- 
though, from a disposition to rely on the wisdom and paternal regard of their 
rulers, they have patiently sustained the restrictions laid on commerce and 
navigation, yet they feel encouraged to hope that recent events in Europe 
have in so great a degree changed the aspect of political affairs that those 
sources of commerce which are at present closed may again be opened to our 
enterprising citizens and the prospect of relief be realized. They eagerly em- 
brace the right authorized by the constitution, the exercise of which is warrant- 
ed by their present situation, to address their ruler upon subjects which relate 
to the general interest, and in cases of distress to apply to the wisdom of 
government for relief; and therefore respectftilly request, that the laws re- 
lating to the Embargo may be in part or wholly suspended, according to the 
powers vested in the President by the Congress of the United States, or in case 
that the President should consider that for this purpose the authority of Con- 
gress should be necessary, that honorable body may be speedily convened for 
the purpose. 

Answer of the President. 

September 10, 1808. Sir : I beg leave to communicate through you the en- 
closed answer to the Representation which came to me under cover ft-om you, 
and to add the assurances of my respect. Th. Jefferson. 

Seth Williams, Esq., Augusta, Maine. 

To the Inhabitants of the town of Augusta in legal town meeting assembled : 



Additional 

Thomas 

Nathaniel 

William E. 

Luke 

Abraham 

Stephen 

Jotnam 

John 

Ebsn 

Idichael C. 



taxpai/era, 1817 > 
Agry. 
Arnold, 
Burton, 
Barton, 2d, 
Brackett, 2d, 
Brigham, 
Babcock, 
Chamberlain, 
Dnnlap, 
Foater. 



Seth 

George C, 

John S. J. 

George 

Ephraim 

Samuel 

John G. 

Isaac 

A9a 

Jonathan 



Foster, 


John 


Flinn, 


Joseph H. 


Gardin?r, 


Asa 


Hamlen, 


Daniel 


Jones, 


Samuel 


Keaton, 


Clark 


Ladd, 


James 


Leighton, 


Noah 


Mason, jr., 
Philbrick. 


Joel 





Parker, 

Perkins, 

Pierce, 

Savage, 2d, 

Scribner, 

Smith, 

Williams, 

Woodward, jr. 

Wing. 



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174 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



Toar representations and request were received on the 8th instant, and hare 
been considered with the attention due to every expression of the sentiments 
and feelings of so respectable a body of my fellow-citizens. No person has 
seen with more concern than myself the inconveniences brought on our countiy 
in general by the circumstances of the times in which we happen to live ; times 
to which the history of nations presents no parallel. For years we have been 
looking as spectators on our brethren of Europe, afflicted by all those evils 
which necessarily follow an abandonment of the moral rules which bind men 
and nations together. Connected with them in fKendship and commerce, we 
have happily so far kept aloof from their calamitous conflicts by a steady ob- 
servance of justice towards all, by much forbearance and multiplied sacrifices. 
At length, however, all regard to the rights of others having been thrown 
aside, the belligerent powers have beset the highway of commercial intercourse 
with Edicts which, taken together, expose our commerce and mariners, under 
almost every distinction, a prey to their fleets and armies. Each party, indeed, 
would admit our commerce with themselves, with the views of affecting us in 
their war against the other. But we have wished war with neither. Under 
these circumstances were passed the laws of which you complain by those 
delegated to exercise the powers of legislation for you, with every sympathy 
of common interest in exercising them faithfully. In reviewing these meas- 
ures, therefore, we should advert to the difficulties out of which a choice was 
of necessity to be made. To have submitted our rightftil commerce to pro- 
hibitions and tributaiy exactions f^om others would have been to surrender 
our Independence. To resist them by arms was war, without consulting the 
state of things or the choice of the nation. The alternative preferred by the 
Legislature of suspending a commerce placed under such unexampled difU- 
culties, besides saving to our citizens their property and our mariners to their 
country, has the peculiar advantage of giving time to the belligerent nations 
to revise and consider their conduct as contrary to their interests as to our 
rights. 

In the event of such peace or suspension of hostilities between the belligerent 
powers of Europe, or of such change in their measures affecting neutral com- 



Additional 


taxpayers, 1818 


Ephraim 


Ballard, 2d, 


William 


Burden, 


Aaron 


Buffum, 


John 


Craig, 


Rboda 


Cottle, 


Silas 


Church, 


Samuel 


Churchill, 


Asa 


Cummings, 


Rutherford 


Drummore, 


Moses 


Farnham, 


Roland 


Fre3man, 


Smith L. 


Gale, 


Daniel 


Hilton, 


John 


Hill, 


Zachariah 


Johnson, 


Artemas 


Kimball, 


John 


Kimball, jr., 


Allen 


Lambard, 


John 


Lock, 


Samuel 


Lyon. 



Tabor 

David 

Josiah 

Widow 

Samuel 

Jonathan 

Asaph 

Eliza 

William 

John 

Moses 

Charles 

James H. 

Jamss 

Joseph H. 

Jason 

Calvin 

Henry 

John 

Samuel 



Lyon, 


Isaac 


Lei^hton, 


William R. 


McFarland, 


Catharine 


McMaster, 


William 


Morrell, 


Isaac 


Mathews, 


Widow Tila 


Nichols, 


Asa 


Norcross, 


Elijah 


North, 


WUliam 


Page, 


Newell 


Pollard, 


Calvin 


Pollard, 


Lucinda 


Patterson, 


Ebeneser 


Page, 


James 


Page, 


Asa 


Read, 


Charles 


Russell, 


Seth 


Rice, 


John 


Savage, 2d, 




Salsbury. 





Savage, 
Sanford, 
Sanford, 
Sewall, 
Smith, 
X Savage, 
Smiley, 
Snell, 
Stone, jr., 
Stone, 
Spear, 
Swanton, 
Waldron, 
Weston, 
Williams, jr., 
Webber, 
Wright, 
White. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



175 



merce as may render that of the United States snfflciently safe in the judgment 
of the President, he is authorized to suspend the Embargo ; but no peace or 
suspension of hostilities, no change of measures affecting neutral commerce, 
is known to have taken place. The orders of England and the decrees of 
France and Spain existing at the date of these laws are still unrepealed as far 
as we know. In Spain, indeed, a contest for the government appears to have 
arisen ; but of its course or prospects we have no information on which pru- 
dence would undertake a hasty change in our policy even were the authority 
of the Executive competent to such a decision. 

You desire that, in this defect of power, Congress may be specially convened. 
It is unnecessary to examine the evidence* or the character of the facts which 
are supposed to dictate such a call, because you will be sensible, on an attention 
to dates, that the legal period of their meeting is as early as, in this extensive 
country, they could be ftilly convened by a special call. 

I should with willingness have executed the wishes of the inhabitants of 
Augusta, had peace or repeal of the obnoxious Edicts or other changes pro- 
duced the case in which alone the laws have given me that authority ; and so 
many motives of Justice and interest lead to such changes that we ought con- 
tinually to expect them. But while these Edicts remain the legislature alone 
can prescribe the course to be pursued. Th. Jefferson. 

Voted unanimously, as the sense of this meeting that the representative of 
the town [Samuel Howard] attend the General Court at the approaching ses- 
sion of the Legislature in November next, give all the aid in his power to the 
important business that 8hall come before that honorable body,— particularly 
in the selection and appointment of suitable electors of President and Vice 
President of the United States. 

January 16, 1809. Voted and chose a committee of nine [Solomon Vose, John 
Davis, George Crosby, Thomas Bowman, Peter T, Vose, Samuel Cony, Henry 
W. Fuller, William Brooks, Samuel Howard] to draft and report a set of 
resolutions; and also a memorial to the Legislature of this Commonwealth; 
and the report of the committee being read, was accepted, 85 to 23. 

Embargo Resolutions, 

The Constitution of the United States, as well as of the Commonwealth, 



Additional 


taxpayers, 1819 


Asa 


Babcock, 


David 


Babcock, 


Robart 


Brinbv, 


Jam98 


Black, jr., 


Elitha P. 


Barstow, 


Gould 


Babb, 


Nathan 


Church, 


Rnfiu 


Church, 


George 


Church, 


John 


Clark, 


James 


Cross, 


Ellas 


Cobb, 


Joseph 


Cnmmings, 


Annaoias 


Cottle, 


Elisha 


Child, 


John 


Button, 


Roland 


Freeman, 


Thomas E. 


Gage, jr., 


James 


Grant, 


Caleb 


Gordon, jr., 



Samuel 

Susannah 

William 

Jeremiah 

Solomon 

Alexander 

Isaiah 

Arza 

Samuel 

Washington 

Elijah 

Edward 

Silas 

John 

Thomas 

Wm. F. 

George W. 

Levi 

Nathaniel 

Josiah 



Longfellow, 

Heath, 

Hoskins, 

HiU, 

Hanson, 

Hawes, 

Howara, 

Hayward, 

Ingraham, 

Jewett, 

Ingraham, 

Lock, 

Leighton, 

Mason, 

McCausland, 

Moros, 

Morton, 

Paj^9, jr., 

Philbrick, jr., 

Parker. 



Charles 

Thomas 

Edward 

David 

Caleb 

John 

Daniel 

David 

Josiah 

James 

Moses 

John 

William 

Charles 

Daniel 

Allen 

Benjamin 

Timothy 

PaulD. 



Pinkham, 

Ricker, 

Robbins, 

Bobbins, 

Robbins, 

Robbins, 

Savage, 3d, 

Savage, 

Shedd, 

Safford, 

Smart, 

Smiley, 

Trask, 

Vanghan, 

Witham, 

Wing, 

Worth, 

Woodward, 

Woodbridge. 



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176 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



guarantees to the people the right of meeting in a peaceable manner to con- 
salt apon the common good and to petition for a redress of grievances ; and 
whenever the republic is in danger the exercise of this right becomes a duty 
. of the tlrst magnitude. A degree of watchAilness and jealousy of our rulers 
is a virtue in republicans, and is the only check to prevent encroachments upon 
the rights of the people. The awftil crisis has arrived when it becomes neces- 
sary for the friends of our independence to make a firm and decided stand ; 
when it becomes all-important to throw aside minor considerations and unite 
for the common good, when a sense of common danger draws us together to 
meet the approaching storm ; and when we are impelled by the duty we owe 
ourselves and our posterity to speak of the conduct of our rulers in the lan- 
guage of IVeemen. Therefore: Resolved, (1) That the restrictions and impo- 
sitions on our trade and commerce are too great and ruinous any longer to be 
borne, and that the great distress of our country demands immediate relief. 
(2) That to the ruinous policy in the rejection of the British treaty is justly 
attributable the calamitous condition of our country and its impending ruin ; 
that circumstances justify a suspicion that the hand which moves and con- 
trols the machine of State is foreign, distant, generally unknown, whose in- 
fluence is contagion and whose touch is death. (S) That from the exposition 
of all the public documents, there Is not sufficient cause to warrant a war with 
Great Britain ; that she is fighting not only for her own rights and liberties, 
but for the preservation and security of the brave Spaniards and of every 
other oppressed people on earth. (4) That we view with Indescribable horror 
the raising a standing army of fifty thousand men in time of peace, with the 
unprecedented power in the President of appointing its officers, without any 
ostensible object ; while we have too much reason to fear its real one is the 
destruction of our republican form of governmeutt which has cost our fathers 
so much blood and treasure in the acquisition, and to which we are so strongly 
attached from inclination, feeling and habit, and which appears designed to 
prepare the way for Monarchy, which has been unquestionably proved to have 
long been the favorite and chosen system of the man [James Monroe] who for 



Additional taxpayers, 1820 


Mark 


Andrews, 


George 


Brackott, 


Samuel 


Brackett, 


Luke N. 


Barton, 


Nathaniel 


Brown, 2d, 


Mary 


Bolton, 


William 


Ballard, 


Nathan 


Brooks, 


Jonathan 


Belden, 


George 


Brownell, 


Thomas 


Burgess, 


Win. S. 


Craig, 


John 


Crosby, 


William 


Clark, 


Gershom 


Clark, 


William 


Chamberlain, 


Samuel 


Cross, 2d, 


Thomas 


Clark, 


William 


Dillingham, 


William 


Dorerty, 


Robcjrt 


Bennison, jr.. 


EUjah 


Elmes. 



James 

Jacob B. 

Ebenezer 

Fhilena 

Halloway 

Jesse 

Thomas 

Peter 

Benjamin 

Oliver 

David 

Moses 

Henry 

James 

Nathaniel 

Simeon 

Ephraim 

Amaziah 

Thomas 

Amos 

John 

Charles 



Eames, 

Flwcg, 

Fuller, 

Foster, 

Farnham, 

Green, 

Goldthwait, 

Gilman, 

Giibreth, 

Hall, jr., 

Hawes, 

Hawes, 

Hatch, 

Gordon, 

Lancaster, 

Leighton, 

Leighton, 

Moore, 

Nickerson, jr., 

Quinby, 

Savage, 

Swanton. 



Edward 

Joel 

Holden 

Stutely 

John 

Comelins 

Benjamin 

Eleazer 

David 

Folly 

Asa 

Alvin 

James 

Rofas C. 

Allen 

Mathias 

Nathan 

John 

Daniel 

WUliam 

Timothy 

Rheuben 



Savage, jr., 

Savage, 

Sanford, 

Springer, jr., 

Shead, 

Smith, 

Savage, 

Smith, 

Sawtelle, jr.. 

Smart, 

Trask, 

Trask, 

Trench, 

V086, 

woeKo, 

Whitney, 

Whitney, 

WilUams, 2d, 

Williams, 

Wiggin, 

Yeaton. 



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THE TO^VN or AUGUSTA. 



177 



the noxt four years Is to govern the destinies of the nation. (6) That no 
friend to the liberties of his country will accept a commission in an army that 
is to rivet chains on his countrymen, destroy the inestimable names of Citizen 
and Civilian and render America a military despotism. (6) That we view with 
the most painfhl apprehensions the additional Embargo law which has Just 
passed both houses of the national legislature,— a law which threatens all we 
hold dear in society ; which no longer permits us an asylum at our firesides 
from pillage and murder; which totally destroys even the coasting trade; con- 
solidates the Union; is subversive of the first principles of civil liberty; and 
which if carried into execution with all its contemplated oppression will bring 
on a civil war, and must inevitably terminate In a separation of the States. 
(7) That with our brethren of Hallowell, we view with equal detestation the 
lawless and wanton acts committed by the hirelings of power in the pretended 
execution of the duties of their office ; and that the channel of direct informa- 
tion is so often impeded or diverted from its course by those who occupy the 
Post-oliice department. And whereas we have heretofore petitioned Congress, 



Additional taxpayers, 1822 


WiUon 


Arnold, 


Cvm3 


Arnold, 


Robert 


Brindley, 


William A 


Brooks, 


E.Theodore Bridge, | 


David 


Bnnker, 


Moses 


Bunker, 


Thomas 


Burgess, jr.. 


Amo 


Bittues, 


John 


Boynton, 


John 


Babcock, 


Neal 


Bean, 


Samuel 


Blake, 


Oliver 


Brackett, 


Daniel 


Baker, 


John 


Bassford, 


Charles 


Cony, 


Elias 


Craig, jr., 
Cottle, 
Church, jr.. 


Charles 
John 


Moody 


Chase, 


Jacob 


Chase, 


Huldah 


Coffin, 


Bob /t H. 


Cony, 


John 


Cony, jr., 


Anson 


Chmch, 


Harvey 


Chase, 


John 


Dearborn, 


William 


Doe, 


William 


Davenport, 


Isaac 


Decker, 


Joseph 


Davis, 


Ezra 


Emeiy, 


Ard 


Emery, 


William 


Foster, 


Cony 


Foster, 


Neheiniah 


Flagg, 


Benjamin 


Follett, 


Brian P. 


Fletcher, 


Georf<e 


Furbish, 


Davis 


Guild, 


Moses 


Grant. 



Daniel 

Edmond 

Arthur 

Dennis 

Moses 

Charles 

Lewis B. 

Henben 

George W. 

William 

LeviB. 

Theodore 

Asa 

Jonathan 

Charles 

Daniel 

Winslow 

Ira 

John 

H. W. 

Simeon 

John 

Jonathan 

Adam 

Alexander 

John K. 

Masa 

Ephraim 

Joseph B. 

Albert 

William 

Eli 

Ithiel 

Benjamin 

Richard 

Joel 

John 

David 

Edmond 

Stephen 

Jacob 

Ichabod 



Goodwin, 

Getchell, 

Getchell, 

Getchell, 

Grant, 

Hamlen, 

Hamlen, 

Hamlen, 

Haskell, 

Hunt, 

Huntoon, 

Hayes, 

Holt, 

Holt, 

Horn, 

Hewins, 

Howard, 

Hall, 

Heath, 

Inf^raham, 

Irish, 

Kimball, 

Knowles, 

Keaton, 

Kiff, 

Kelsey, 

LawBon, 

Leighton, jr., 

Ladd, 

Leavitt, 

lingtist, 

Leeman, 

Lewis, 

Lane, 

Lane, 

Mason, 

McCausland, 

Munsey, 

Merry, 

Mosier, 

Merrill, 

Nutter. 



Barnabas 

Seth 

William 

Benjamin 

Jesse 

John 

Daniel 

AbigaU 

Joseph 

Richard 

Winthrop 

Josephus 

George 

Christopher 

John 

Nathaniel 

Columbus 

Isaac W. 

AbelB. 

Henry 

William 

William 

Robert 

John 

Ephraim E. 

Charles 

Nelson 

Ebenezer 

James 

Zilpha 

Gideon 

Abiarzer 

James 

Joseph 

Silas L. 

Joseph 

Jewett 

Levi 

Moses 

John L. 



Packard, 

Pitts, 2d, 

Partridge, 

Parker, 

Parker, 

Packard, 

Packard, 

Ranlet, 

Robinson, 

Robinson, 

Robinson. 

Rockwood, 

Rigby, 

Ripley, 

Rowe, 

Ranick, 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Shad wick, 

Shadwick, 

Sawyer, 

Sawyer, jr.. 

Smart, 

Springer, 

Swan, 

Swanton, 

Savage, 

Tyler, 

Thwing, 

Williams, 

Wing, 

Whitney, 

White, 

Wallace, 

Wait, 

Waterhouse, 

White, 

Warren, 

Wells, 

Young. 



12 



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178 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



bat without eflfect, therefore resolved (8) that a committee be appointed to 
draft a Memorial to the Legislature of this Commonwealth, unfolding to them 
our distress and misery, and assuring them of our determination to defend the 
cause of liberty and real republicanism ; praying them to adopt such meas- 
ures that Massachusetts may again, as in the days of '75, dash in pieces the 
shackles of Tyranny and Oppression, and open the door to Freedom. Resolved 
that these proceedings be signed by th^ Moderator and Town Clerk and pub- 
lished in the Kennebec Gazette. 

Memorial to the Legislature. 
To the Honorable Senate and the Honorable House of Representatives of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled January, 
1809. 
The inhabitants of Augusta with diffidence approach the presence of their 
Rulers. Inconsiderable in consequence and interior in situation, it has seemed 
peculiarly proper that they should rather imitate than emulate their brethren 
of the commercial seaboard towns in expressions of patriotism and confidence 
in their State Legislature. The momentous crisis, however, of our public 
affairs, paramount to all considerations of etiquette, irresistably impels them 
to the adoption of a Constitutional right for a redress of grievances, une- 
quivocal in their nature and incalculable in their extent. 



Additional taxpayers, 1823* 



Amaziah 


Baker, 


Winthrop 


Hayes, 


Augustine 


Ansel 


Baker, 


Sylvanns C 


. Hearsey, 


John 


Nathan 


Backus, 


James 


Hewins, 


Thomas 


James 


Barnard, 


John 


Holmes, 


AbiffAil 
David 


William 


Black, 


Alvan 


Holt, 


Thomas 


Black, 


Sherbnm 


Huse, 


Josiah 


Edward 


Black, 


Jesse 


Healey, 


Jonathan 


Benjamin 


Branch, jr., 


Ebeneser 


Jones,. 


James 


John C. 


Brooks, 


Erastus 


Jones, 


Salmon 


G3orK3 


Browning, 


Rolan 


Josseiyn, 


Amos 


David 


Bunker, 


Abial 


Jones, 


Levi 


Robert T. 


Brook, 


Alvan 


Keith, 


Robert F. 


William 


Cunningham^ 


William 


Knight, 


John 


WiUiam 


Cun'ingh*m,jr 


Joseph 


Knowles, 


John 


Waitei 


Cain, 


Saarchwell 


Lane, 


Daniel D. 


Joshua 


Carr, 


Reuel W. 


Lawson, 


Amos 


Robert H. 


Carey, 


David B. 


Lvman, 


Elisha 


William 


Clark, jr.. 


Elijah 


Littlefield, 


Jacob 


Lavi 


Cochran, 


Nathaniel 


Lovering, jr., 


Stilman 


Jacob 


Danforth, 


John 


Martin, 


Hugh 


Levi 


Danforth, 


Tristram 


McCausland, 


Enoch 


Bilai 


Danforth, 


John 


Murray, 


Israel 


Asa 


Dearborn, 


John 


Morrill, 


G(3org3 W. 


Henry 


Dearborn, 


John 


Nason, 


James 


Robert 


Duren, 


Henrv W. 


Nichols, 


Richard H 


. Honry 


Doe, 


Charles E. 


Norton, 


Samuel 


William N 


. Farwell, 


Ald3n 


Packard, 


Daniel 


Thomas 


Foster, 


Sarah 


Page, 


John 


Jonathan A. Freeze, 


Benjamin 


Packani, 


John 


Reaben 


Gardiner, 


Frederic 


Pishon, 


John 


Eliza H. 


Gardiner, 


Eliphalet 


Perkins, 


Asa 


Charles 


Goodwin, 


Benjamin 


Perkins, 


John 


Virgil 


Guild, 


Lyman 


Perry, 


Ssdate 


John 


Goodwin, 


Benjamin 


Palmer, 


James 


Ira 


Hatch, 


Amos C. 


Partridge, 


David 


John 


Hawes, 


Stephsn 


PoUard, 


Joseph 


Elijah 


Hawes. 


Walter 


Pinkham. 


Henry 



Richardson, 
Randall, 
Randall, 
Ranlet, 
Robbins, jr., 
Robbins, 
Rogers, 
Revice, 
Richmond, 
Rollins, 
Savage, 
Savage, 
Scriggins, 
Sabins, 
Smith, 
Spiller, 
Springer, 
Stanwood, 
Stone, 
Smiley, 
Steams, 
Thomdike, 
Tavlor, 
Taylor, 
, Vose, 
Verrv, 
Waldron, 
Ward, 
Ward, jr., 
Whita, 2d, 
White, 
Whiting, jr., 
Whitney, 
Wiggin, 
MMlber, 
Webb, 
Young. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



179 



With submission amounting almost to criminal apathy, we have suffered 
privations and restrictions, never before expected of or endured by a ft'ee peo- 
ple. We have seen our commercial consequence mouldering into ruin, and 
permitted the sacrifice of almost the whole capital of our fortunes. Our em- 
poriums exhibit nothing but the sickly, spasmodic estate of the American na- 
tion ; and we are at a loss which most to admire, the moderation and forbear- 
ance of the people, or the cruel and unnecessary exactions of their rulers, but 
now that even the means of subsistence is at hazard, and the sacred asylum of 
our dwellings no longer held inviolable, silence would be crime, and resist- 
ence may become a virtue of the first magnitude. 

With mingled emotions of pride and regret, we reflect on the blessings we 
enjoyed in the just and dignified administration of the immortal Washington. 
Our national character rose to the highest point of elevation ; civil and re- 
ligious lil>erty was considered the birthright of an American, and a spirit of 
commercial enterprise was aroused and maintained, productive of public 
wealth and individual prosperity ; but the fUU tide of philosophical experi- 



Additional taxpayers, 1825 » 



John 


Austin, 


John 


Allen, 


Caleb P. 


Bailey, 


Nathan 


Backus, 


Edmand 


Black, 


JohnC. 


Blackman, 


Charles 


Booker, 


Nathaniel 


Branch, 


Stephen 


Branch, 


John 


Brackott, 


Ehen 


CaldweU, 


Alfred 


Clark, 


James 


Clark, 


Benjamin S 


. Clark, 


WiUiam H 


Clark, 


Samnel 


Chamberlain, 


Samuel 


Choate, 


Widow 


Cheever, 


David 


Cnmmings, 


Samuel 


Cmmmet, 


P. 


Crummet, 


B. 


Cmmmet, 


Francis 


Cross. 
Canmngham, 


Samuel 


Jonathan 


Davenport, 


Samnel 


Davis, 


Aaron 


Day, 


SpUier 
Hartwell & 


Dewey, 


c Eveleth, 


Kns^ell 


Eaton, 


Josiah 


Fairfield, 


Moses H. 


Famham, 


Omar 


Fletcher, 


James 


Flai?^, 


Eban 


Fuller, 


James 


Folsom, 


Nathaniel 


Folsom, 


Elijah 


Foote, 


Amos 


Oale, 


Lanriston 


Guild, 


Edmund 


Getchell, jr. 



John T. 

Joshua B. 

David 

Watson F. 

Sarah 

LlbbeuB 

James M. 

Thomas 

Ebsn 

Ruth Lee 

Asa 

Hogh 

W. 

Eliab 

William M. 

James 

Ward 

Robert 

Stephen 

Alfred 

William 

Banjamin 

Andrew 

Brooks & 

James S. 

Abraham C. 

Nathaniel 

Amos B. 

Thomas H. 

Thomas 

Moses 

Francis 

Miss 

Reuben 

Nathaniel 

Daniel 

Benj. A. 

David 

Daniel 

Thomas 

Elisha 



Gilpatrick, 

Hartford, 

Hawes, 

Hallett, 

Haines, 

Hayward, 

Ingraham, 

Jones, 

Jenkins, 

Jones, 

Kemp, 

Kelley, 

Lane, 

Lyon, 

Ladd, 

Lloyd, 

Locke, 

Lewis, 

Ladd, 

Lawson, 

Little, 

Lawrence, 

McKenney, 

M3ans, 

McOrath, 

Mitchell, 

Nichols, 

Nichols, 

Nason, 

Nickerson, 

Niles, 

Norris, 

Orne, 

Partridge, 

Partridgs, 

Piper, 

Palmer, 

Packard, 

Pike, 

Phillips, 

Presoott. 



Judith 

Williams & 

William 

Susannah 

Newton 

Elisha 

James 

William 

Samnel 

Luther 

William 

Lucinda 

Jonathan 

Benjamin 

Joseph • 

Nathaniel 

Charles 

Benjamin 

Parker & 

Stephen 

Joseph 

Elbndge G. 

William 

David 

Ebenezer T. 

James 

Edward 

Israel 

Oliver 

Jonathan 

Elias 

Edward 

Ephraim 

Thomas 

Edward J. 

John 

Thomas 

Lawson & 

Oliver C. 



Prescott, 

Redington, 

Robinson, 

Rockwood, 

Reynolds, 

Robbins, 

Russell, 

Robbins, 1st, 

Scribner, 

Severance, 

Shorey, 

Swanton, 

Sturgis, 

Stackpole, 

South wick, 

Steadman, 

Town, 

Tappan, 

Thwing, 

Tilton, 

Tolman, 

Wall, 

Wade, 

Wall, 

Warren, 

Wigffins, 

Williams, 

Wilbur, 

Welch, 

White, 

Wight, 

Welch, 

Wadsworth, 

Wads worth. 

White, 

Webber, 

Whittier, 

Williams, 

Young. 



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180 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



ment arrested our high career, and has almost obliterated the name of America 
A*om the catalogue of nations ; oar national honor is at the point of derision ; 
our treasury, both in capital and resource, exhausted; foreign commerce an- 
nihilated, and home trade gone to decay ; a standing army raised in a time of 
peace to enforce the laws of a republican government; the voice of complaint 
and distrust vociferated ft-om Georgia to Maine, and we have little in the pro- 
spective but national bankruptcy and military despotism. 

The meeting of our national legislature we had fondly anticipated as the 
period of these our unnecessary trials ; and that the trident of commerce 
would again have gladdened our western shores. In the supplicating language 
of distress, we describe our grievances, fUll in the belief that our prayers 
would not have proved unavailing ; but this our confidence has been our folly ; 
from hope we have passed to disappointment and ttom disappointment to de- 
spair, almost beyond hope ; and we are compelled by imperious necessity, in 
the Aice of Heaven to declare, that our confidence in the present administra- 
tion of the national government is at an end ; and that they seem fatally de- 
termined to drive us to the dreadful alternative of yielding up our Republican 
form of Government and submitting to the basest tyranny and oppression, or 
seeking safety and protection in an Union and solemn compact of the Northern 
States. 

We view with utter abhorrence and detestation the measures pursued by an 
Imperial Majority in our National Legislature ; new and more arbitrary re- 
strictions are imposed upon ns, and though the cup of degredation and dis- 
tress was already ftill to the brim, the point of the bayonet is to take the place 



Additional taxpayers, 1828. 



Fla«g & 


Abom, 


John 


Gale, 


Thomas L. 


Frederic 


Abom, 


Luther 


Gordon, 


Comfort 8. 


RoUey 


Asplnwall, 
Al&n, 


Oliver 


Hewlns, 


Allen J. 


Lemuel 


WiUiamH 


. Hatch, 


Luther C. 


George 


Allen, 


David 


HiU, 


Alfred 


Perkins & 


Ames, 


Henry B. 


Hovey, 


Hiram 


Silas 


Alden, 


Daniel 


Holway, 


Moses H. 


William 


Burgess, 


Rufns 


Haskell, 


Edward 


William 


Bridge, 


William 


Higgins, 
Holmes, 


Thomas 


David 


Briggs, 




Isaac 


Dudley P. 


Bailey, 


Ephraim 
Virgil H. 


Hackett, 


Levi 


Jeremiah 


Bumnam, 


Hewes, 


Alfred 


Alexander 


Black. 


Robert 


Hall, 


Luther 


Gustavus A. Blake, 


Mary 


Hatch, 


John 


Charles H. 


Beck, 


Bovd 


Howard. 


Thomas 


John 


Brinkman, 


William 


W54 


Asa 


Benjamin 


Britt, 


Eli 


Charles 


John 


Bodwell, 


James 


Nathaniel 


Henry A. 


Brooks, 


Alexander 


Kincade, 


Hiram . 


James S. 


Ballard, 


David 


Knowlton, 


WUlard 


Humphrey 
Elijah 


Burgess, 


William 


Kimball, 


Daniel 


Burgess, 


Thomad 


Lambard, 


David 


Cyrus 


Briggs, 


Allen 


Itaac 


William 


Burden, 


William 


Lambard, 


Sumner 


Robert 


Beattie, 


Elijah M. 


Lancaster, 


William 


Richard 


Bugden, 


Silas 


Leavett, 


Jefferson 


Elisha 


Barrows, 


Benjamin S. Leigh ton. 


Harlow 


Pike & 


Caldwell, 


Nathan 


Leighton, 


Issachar 


Nason & 


Chandler, 


Smithson 


Leighton, 


Job 


Osgood 


Carleton, 


Thomas B. 


LitUe 


David 



Pollard, 

PuUen, 

Paine, 

Pettenglll, 

Redington, 

Rockwood, 

Ripley, 

Robinson, 

Rines, 

Reed, 

Rogers, 

Reynolds, 

Reynolds, 

Sanford, 

Spaulding, 

Safford, 

Sanford, 

Sabins, 

Smith, 

Snell, 

Stickney, 

Sanborn, 

Stone, 

Stone, 

Starret, 

Soule, 

Spaulding, 

Snell, 

Swift, 

StiUson, 



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THE TOWN or AUGUSTA. 



181 



of the cheerful, willing obedience of a tree people ; the constltation we had 
vainly concluded interposed a barrier against a standing army in a time of 
peace ; but the instructive lesson of experience has taught us that constitu- 
tions and laws, precedents and doctrine, form no adequate security against 
the inordinate desire of power in ambitious men. 

We have long seen with deep concern the blind and ruinous predilection of 
our Democratic Administration In favor of one belligerent to the prejudice of 
another ; the smallest errors of Great Britain have been magnified into the 
most outrageous aggressions, while to France there has been a marked, mean, 
cowardly and cringing disposition, a justification of the basest measures, and 
a blind system of favoritism unworthy the rulers of a great and ft-ee people ; 
and we tremble lest the liberties and Independence of America are to be im- 
molated at the shrine of the Mighty Tyrant of Europe [Napoleon Bonaparte], 
whose Insatiable ambition and thirst of power disturb the peace and happi- 
ness of every State, pervert the sacred name of liberty, and tlireaten to ed- 
tablish an universal system of usurpation and tyranny. 

And what, under heaven, is the security of America against the enormous 
strides of the mighty Mammoth of Europe? The wooden walls of the British 
nation. Yes, impressive truth; remove this barrier, and America becomes a 
Colony to Imperial France. On the issue of the unequal contest in which 
Great Britain is now engaged, depends the welfare and existence not only of 
this country, but every civilized society upon earth. 

With deepest concern we recognize that a Standing Army, ftiUy adequate to 



Additional 

William 

Mary 

Amos 

Edsrar M. 

Andrew 

Jason H. 

Samuel 

EUas 

Elijah 

Martin 

Daniel 

Gabriel 

Ovren 

Jonathan 

Joseph 

Zebalon 

William A, 

Nathaniel 

James 

Lewis 

James 

Jacob 

Thomas 

Nicholas 

Frederick 

Levi 

John 

JohnC. 

George 

Enodi 

Joshna £. 

WilUam 



taxpayers, 25^5,— concluded. 



Chase, 

Church, 

Chorch, 

ChurchUl, 

Clark, 

Cony, 

Cony, 2d, 

Craig, 2d, 

Clark, 

Carrol, 

Campbell, 

Cotee, 

Clark, 

Clay, 

Dummer, 

Davis, 

Drewj 

Doe, jr., 

Dick man, 

Frencli, 

Foster, 

Foye, 

Fargo, 

Flai?g, 

Fuller , 

Foye, 

Foye, 

Foster, 

Finn, 

Fnrbosh, 

Gage, 

Godfrey. 



George A. 

John 

Jefferson B. 

Widow A, 

Eben 

Daniel 

Stephen 

Widow I. 

George W. 

William 

W. C. 

Thomas 

Wm. C. 

David 

Nathaniel 

Nathaniel 

Isaac 

Francis 

Thomas 

James R. 

Greenlief 

Thomas 

James 

Widow 

John A. 

William 

John A. 

George W. 

Elisha 

Rnfns 

John 

James N. 



Longfellow, 


Lather 


Snell, 


Jonas D. 


Sannders, 


Lyon, 


Nathan 


Thomas, 
TwltcheU, 


Lyon, 
Libbey, 


Daniel 


Arbert 


Trask, 


Libbey, 


Thomas 


Town, 


Lovejoy, 


Bridge & 


Vose 


Mason, 


John 


Walker, 


Morton & Co., 


Benjamin 


Wade, 


Moore, 


Joseph 


Wall, 
Ward, 


Mitchell, 


Joshua 


McGill, 


Barnard & 


ZT 


Meserve, 


Ezra 


Morgan, 


John 


White, 


Morrell, 


Albert 


Woodward, 


McGraw, 


White & 


Williams, 


Munsey, 


' Greenleaf 


White, 


Nichols, 


William 


White, 


Paine, 


Charles 


Wheeler, 


Palmer, 


Ephraim 


Walton, 


Page, 


Patrick 


Wallace, 


Parker, 


William L. 


Wheeler, 


Paine, 


William 


West, jr.. 
Woods, 


Pettengill, 


Henry 


Pettengill, 


Wm. 


WiUey, 


Pierce, 


Freeman 


Weeks, 


Pitts, 
Perkins, 


Solomon 


Wells, 


Otis 


Whitney, 


Parker, 


Thomas 


Young. 


Paine, 






Pratt, 






Pope. 







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182 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



rivet the chains of despotism, is now to be the portion of America. We view 
it as the portentioQs precurser of the requiem of our liberties. It is iu vain 
to talk of fk-eedom, where the arbitrary will and daring assumption of power 
in our rulers are to be justified and enforced at the point of the bayonet. Our 
case Is indeed critical in the extreme; but, thank heaven, the remedy Is yet in 
our power; the National Government was created and instituted for our use 
and benefit ; if perverted or misused we have only to recall our agency, re- 
assume our inherent and unalienable rights and authority, and institute some 
other fiction more congenial to our interests and national honor. We indulge 
the hope that whatever differences have hitherto subsisted in the minds of the 
inhabitants of the Northern States upon abstract questions or political senti- 
ment will be absorbed and lost in the general danger; and that a spirit of 
unanimity will pervade and animate every rank and description of persons. 
Common interest should now induce us to unite for the preservation of Lib- 
erty, Independence, and everything dear to us as Americans. 



Additional t€uepay era, 1830. 



Doe 


Alden, 


Benjamin 


Currier, 


James Z. 


Willard 


Axtell, 
Arnold, 


Henry 


Conch, 


Ambrose 


Samael 


Jefferson 


Cleveland, 


Loten 


John 


Arnold, jr.. 


Charles C. 


Cummings, 


Joseph 


Charles 


Allen, 


John 


Clark, jr., 
Clark, jr.. 


Nathan 


Jacob H. 


Arnold, 


Joel 


John 


Asa 


Axtell, 


Alfred D. 


Churchell. 
Dashwood, 


Jonah 


John 


Barret, 


Charles P. 


Renel 


Shubael 


Baker, 


Thomas 


Dickman. 


Isaiah 


James W. 


Bradbury, 


Constantine Dickman', 


Edward 


James 


Brick, 


Gustavus A. Dickman, 


Partridge 
Bezaleei C. 


John 


Barrows, 


Joseph H. 


Dillingham, 


James 


Bridge, jr., 


John M. 


Doe, 


George 


Samael 


Blake, 


Simeon 


Doe, 
Decker, 


Moses 


Horatio 


Bridge, 


John C. 


Jacob 


Samuel 


Babcock, 


Ralph 


Dacker, 
Dillingham, 


Benj. 


Stephen 


Babcock, 


Hannibal 


Amaziah 


Daniel 


Bailey, 


Pitt 


Dillingham, 


Solomon 


Isaac 


Bailey, 


Lemuel 


Davenport, 


Moses 


Geor^H. 


Brown, 
Bodwell, 


Ammi 


Dennison, 


John H. 


David 


Abner 


Dennison, 


Lemuel 


John 


Bolton, 


George 


Dunn, 


Drew, 


Phebe 


Baker, 


Joseph D. 


Emery, 


Burrey 


Micah 


Barrows, 


JoelR. 


Ellis, 


Israel 


Aaron N. 


Bnrgess, 


Calvin 


Edson, 


Andrew 


Widow 


Blackburn, 


William 


Ford, 


John 


Oliver 


Beale, 


John 


Fisher, 


Danfoith P 


Frederic A 


. Bell, 


Sumner 


French, 


Cornelius 


John W. 


Bangs, 


Daniel 


Foster, 


JarvisA 


John 


Brown, 


Robert 


Fisher, 


Nathaniel 


Samuel G. 


Bnms, 


John 


Fifleld, 


Squier 
Thomas 


William F 


. Brown, 


Mason C. 


Farrar, 


George 


Burgess, 


R. M. 


Ford, 


Charles 


Peter A. 


Brinsmade, 


Aaron K. 


Frederick, 


Elon 


Michael M 


. Brean, 


Sanford, 


Gale& 


Daniel 


Benjamin 


Cross, 


Samuel 


Gilley. 


Daniel 


Churchell, 


Sumner W. Getchell, 


William 


George 


Conv, 


Zebulon 


Grant, 


John H. 


Ellas 


Crai'g, 3d, 


Charles C. 


Grant, 


Elkanah 


Stephen 


Crosby, 


Antoine 


Guior, 


Norcross 


Hannah 


Clark, 


RoweU M. 


Grant, 


Andrew 


Hiram 


Craig, 


Abbot 


George, 


Stephen 


Edwin 


Craig, 


Calvin 


Green, 


Bracket 


Otis 


Clark, 


Thomas B 


. Hayden, 


Eben 


Henry 


Chadwick, 


John 


Hawkins. 


William 



Humphrey, 
Hayward, 
Hall, 
Haskell, 
Hunt, 
Hartwell, 
Heath, 
Howard, jr., 
Hayward, 
Hamlen, 
Hill 

Hnssey, 
Haley, 
Hntchings, 
Hooper, 
Holway, 
Howard, 
Huges, 
Ingraham, 
Ingraham, 
Jones, 
Kingsley & 
Lynch, 
Leavitt, 
Lewis, 
Ladd, 

. Livermore, 
Lane, 
Lawson, 
Lovejoj^, 
Lyon, jr.. 
Little, 
LitUe, 
Lyon, jr.. 
Lane, 
Lock, 
Lewis, 
McGrath, 
Miller, 
Means, 
Murray, 
Mayhew, 
Marston, 
Marston, 
McLaughlin. 



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THE TOWN OP AUGUSTA. 



183 



We earnestly solicit the early attention of yoar Honorable Bodies to the 
alarming condition of oar public affairs, and the common distress of oar Coun- 
try. Too severe and extensive are the grievances complained of to be much 
longer endared ; and never was the saving help of legislative interference more 
absolutely necessary. We would not presume to dictate the path of duty ; but 
look with unshaken confidence to the wisdom and patriotic exertions of oui 
State Legislature for the adoption of measures and remedies commensurate 
to the evils and dangers of this awful crisis. If our condition admits of no 
relief, no amelioration; if a weak or wicked Administration of our National 
Government has so for precipitated us into ruin that we think it better to go 
on than recede, and we are to be driven to the last point of desperation, the 
calamitous consequences are known only to Him **who measures years and 
days and fortunes." In every event, however, of public exigency we owe to 
you, the Guardians of our Constitution and rights, the most unequivocal de- 
claration of our determined resolution of support, with our lives and fortunes; 
and that we will resist with firmness every attempt that may be made, f^om 
whatever quarter, whether foreign or domestic, to subvert our Constitution, 
our liberties and independence, or perish in the attempt. 

Solomon Vose, Samuel Cony, 

John Davis, Henry Weld Fuller, 

George Crosby, Samuel Howard, 

Thomas Bowman, William Brooks. 

Peter Thatcher Vose. 

AddiHonal taxpayers^ 2 ^^0,— concluded. 



Nathaniel 


McLaughlin, 


Jacob 


Benjamin 


Morey, 
Mitchell, 


Elias 


Charles 


Edward 


Bradford 


McFarland, 


William 


James 


Nye, 


Benjamin 


Jacob N. 


Noyes, 


Jonathan 


William 


Norton, 


Robert 


Joseph 


Nichols, 


Salmon 


Thomas 


Ordiome, 


Mark 


Shubael 


Pease, 


James 


James 


Partridge, 


Riley 


Mary 


David 


Allen 


Partridge, 


Timothy 


Howard & 


Pettengill, 


Hiram 


Frederick 


Perkins, 


John C. 


Asa 


Paine, 


Ira 


Benjamin 


PettengiU, 


Micah 


George 


Page, 


Thomas 


William 


?1SW' 


John 


Springer, 


Robert 


Stephen A. 


Page, 


Joseph J. 


Wheeler, 


Perkms & 


Henry 


Nathaniel 


Paine, jr.. 


Daniel 


George W. 


Perkins, jr.. 


Samnel 


Theodore P. Paine, 


Mary 


Lieut. 


Piper, 


Robert 


Daniel 


Proctor, 


David 


Alvan 


Robinson, 


Isaac 


Daniel 


Rose, 


Henry 


Charles 


Ripley, 
Rotnnson, 


Eben 


Edmund 


Miss 


George 


RoUins. 


Nicholas 



Rideont, 


Frederic 


Spencer, 


Rideont, 


Samuel 


Smith, 


Rowse, 


John 


Shattuck, 


Robbins, 2d, 


Renel 


Townsend, 


RandaU, 


Nathaniel 


Townsend, 


Rogers, 


Edward 


Town, 


Rollins, 


Joel 


Thomes, 


Rockwood, jr. 


James 


ToUer, 


Rideont, 


Tucker & 


Turner, 


Rideont, 


Henry 


WUliams, 


Rideont, 


Robert 


Wood, 


Ross, 


Israel 


Webber, 


Shepard, 


Joseph 


Wight, 


Safford, 


Charles 


Webber, 2d, 
Woart, jr.. 


Stuart. 
Spauiding, 


WiUiam 


Henry 


Winslow, 


Safford, 


William 


Woodward, 


Sewall, 


Caleb 


Wilson, 


Sherman, 


Brown, 
Samnel 


WilUams & 


Sherman, 


Wood, 


Sager, 


William K 


. Weston, 


Sager, 


John 


Wheeler, 


Savage, 


Isaac D. 


Wing, 


Smart, 


Lewis 


Wells, 


Smart, 


Charles F. 


Wingate, 


Scribner, 


William 


Wendenbnrg 


Sanford, 


Samnel 


Whittemore, 


Sanford, 


David 


Young, 


Sawyer, 


John 


Young, 


Sawyer, 

Smith, 

Shaw. 


Joseph M. 


YQun^. 







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184 HISTORr OP AUGUSTA. 

The several embargoes "^ together with the war of 1812-14, 
bore grievously on Augusta, in common with their disastrous 
effects on many other towns within the District of Maine. All 
of the seaboard states were injuriously affected by the govern- 
ment's unpopular policy ; and none more so than the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. Party spirit grew intense in some 
parts. The town of Castine voted " thanks to Captain Samuel 
A. Whitney, for his manly and patriotic conduct in withdraw- 
ing his guns from the cutter in the service of the United States 
to enforce the embargo laws."® If this was not a passionate ex- 
hibition of the spirit of rebellion — such as deluged the land 
with blood fifty-two years later — what was it? 

A large proportion of the men then engaged in business in 
Augusta were interested in ship-building amd navigation, and 
the necessary operation of the embargo was destructive of their 
business and property ; their ships instead of making profitable 
voyages lay decaying at the wharves, and financial distress and 
in many cases bankruptcy followed ; business declined, credit 
was impaired, and from 1807 until 1814, there was a steady, 
visible decline in the business of the town. Not a vessel was 
built here in 1813 ^ and in that year every store excepting one 
was closed, and the burden of traflSo which formerly centered 
in Augusta had become directed to other places. Few if any 
dwellings or other buildings were erected by private individuals. 
The town-house only was built in 1810-*11. Large and nu- 
merous piles of manufactured lumber ready for shipment cum- 
bered the banks of the river, and there gradually deteriorated 
into a condition of little value. In 1817, the shipping owned 
in Augusta did not exceed one hundred tons, and the stock in 
trade was estimated at $10,940 ; while during the years 1808, 

7 The earliest embargo of the United 1813, but it was repealed four months later. 

States was laid by Congress in 1794, for This one prohibited all exports whatsoever, 

sixty days, upon all vessels in the porta of and even stopped the coasting trade ; fisher- 

the republic. The second was laid Decem- men were required to give bonds not to 

ber 22, 1807, and continued in force until violate the act. 

1809. Another was laid April 12, 1812, but 8 History of Castine, by George Augustus 
it was superseded by the declaration of war Wheeler (1875), pp. 78, 79. 
against England, June 18, 1812. .The 9 List of vessels built in Augusta and Hal- 
fourth and last one was laid December 19, lowell, 1781-1899. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 185 

1809, and 1810, the former exceeded one thousand tons and the 
latter was rated at something over $100,000. In September, 
1814, the war closed, and presently the long season of depres- 
sion was succeeded by a business revival. ^^ 

Voted that the foregoing resolutions be signed by the moderator [Joseph 
North] and town clerk [Henry Sewall], and published in the Kennebec Gazette, 

January 18, 1810. Voted unanimously, that it is not expedient, that the 
petition of Jesse Robinson and others, should be granted,— the prayer of 
which is, that a certain portion of this town and of the towns of Hallowell, 
Winthrop, and Readfleld, may be set off and erected into a separate town ; and 
that the representative of the town [Samuel Howard] be instructed to oppose 
the measure." 

May 7, 1810. Voted that the town will purchase of Mr. Lewis Hamlen the 
materials of the old meeting-house, at the sum of $175. 

Voted that a committee of seven be appointed to enquire upon what terms 
a piece of land can be obtained, on which to place a town-house, and report 
at a future meeting; and that Noah Woodward, Reuel Howard, Lewis Hamlen, 
Bei^jamin Whitwell, and John Davis, be the committee. 

(South Parish Records. December 16, 1809. Whereas the Court of General 
Sessions of the Peace within and for the county of Kennebec in accepting the 
road [laid out by the town iu 1783,] from Kennebec river by the old meeting- 
house to Winthrop, did except and exempt certain buildings standing on said 
road flrom being nuisances and from liability to indictment as such, so long as 
they should be made use of and considered as public buildings ; and whereas 
the parish have completed and dedicated the new meeting-house and therefore 
have no further use for the building which till lately they have Improved for 
the purpose of public worship, and which this last mentioned building was one 
of those excepted and exempted as aforesaid, therefore, voted unanimously 
that we will no further use said last mentioned building for the purpose of 
public worship orfor any other public purpose whatever, and that we no longer 
consider it as a public building, pp. 141-142.) 

June 18, 1810. Voted that the town will purchase the piece of land near the 
pound on the Winthrop [road], as offered by Judge North, for $50, for the 
purpose of erecting thereon a town-house. 

Voted to raise a committee to erect the town house on the piece of land, to 
be purchased of Judge North, in as cheap a manner as can be done ; that Lewis 
Hamlen, Reuel Howard, George Read, and Joshua Gage, be this committee; 
and that said committee be authorized and directed to take a deed of said land 
in behalf of the town, from Judge North. 

The work of constructing the Town-house was begun in the 
summer of 1810, and completed in the fall of 1811. The new 

u Daniel Williams* MS. year. See lecord of Deoember 25, 1811. 

. u This movement to form a new town The petition of Jesse Robinson referred to 
was held in abeyance until the following was not presented to the Legislature. 



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186 HISTORY or AUGUSTA. 

building was occupied the firattime by a town meeting December, 
25, 1811. It continued to \ye the usual place for the town meet- 
ings for thirty-seven yeai's. It was sold bj' auction in 1848 to 
Ai Staples for $105, and since that time has been in private own- 
ership. Cost of the town-house : 

Paid Joseph and Hannah North for land, $50.00 

Lewis Hamlen for the old meeting-house, 175.00 

Sundry persons for materials and labor ,*' 976.11 

$1201.11 

The following named were the persons who ftirnished materials and labor : 
Daniel Ames, Will B. Johnson, 

William Babcock, Joseph Ladd, 

Ephraim Ballard, Jr., Samuel Livermore, 

Jonathan Bond, Nason and Smith, 

James Bridge, James F. Norris, 

Ephraim Burges, Jr., Gershom North, 

Eveleth & Child, Joseph North, 

Isaac Cowan, Benjamin Pettengill, 

Cyrus Guild, Joseph Ranlet, 

Lewis Hamlen, Robinson and Crosby, 

Daniel Hartford, DeLafayette Bowell, 

Samuel Hovey, Enoch Rowell, 

Beriah Ingraham, John Sonle, 

Stephen Jewett. Charles Williams. 

Dec. 25, 1811. Voted unanimously, that it is the sense of this meeting, that 
it is not expedient for the town of Angusta to be divided as prayed for in a 
late petition of William Richards and others, but that the lines thereof 
remain as they now are. Voted that the selectmen be a committee to draft a 
remonstrance to the General Court against the proposed division aforesaid, to 
be preferred at the next session. 

The history of this attempt to form a new town from portions 
of four adjacent towns is best given by the original papers in the 
archives of the Commonwealth at Boston. The project was 
spiritedly antagonized particularly by the people of Augusta and 
Hallowell. The initiatory petition and the remonstrances pre- 
sent the names and indicate approximately the places of residence 
of a large number of citizens in the year 1811, and give inter- 
esting contemporary glimpses of leading men in both the villages 
of Augusta and Hallowell, and of the relative size of the hamlet 
at the Cross-Roads. 

uSalectmen*8 orders, 1810 and 1811. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 187 

The text of the Hallowell remonstrance is a composition of 
ait and humor and delicate raillery not often discoverable in 
documents connected with prosy town affairs ; and it is no cause 
for astonishment that the honorable senate and house of repre- 
sentatives did not grant the prayer of the petitioners. The pres- 
ent town of Manchester (incorporated under the name of Ken- 
nebec in 1850,) corresponds in territory nearly to that of the 
proposed but never realized town of Naples. 

Petition for a New Toton. 
To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth: The Subscribers Inhabitants of part of the towns of Hallowell, Au- 
gusta, Read field and Winthrop, In the County of Kennebec, respectfully represent 
that they labour under many Inconveniences in their present situation In the 
aforesaid towns; many of your petitioners having to travel six or seven miles 
to attend town meetings, publick worship, and military duty ; that in the 
opinion of your petitioners many advantages would result to them if the follow- 
ing tract of land with the Inhabitants thereon residing (being a part of the 
several towns above mentioned) were incorporated into a town by the follow- 
ing lines, to wit : Beginning at the northwest corner of Augusta, and thence 
eastwardly on the north line of said town to the east line of lot No. 190 ; thence 
southerly on the west line of the great Gore (so called) to the south line of 
the north parish in Augusta; thence easterly on said south line to the north- 
east corner of lot No. IS; thence southerly between the second and third 
miles to the south line of Augusta; thence south southwest to the south line 
of Hallowell great lot No. 22d in Hallowell ; thence west northwest on said 
south line to Cobbosee great pond or stream ; thence across said pond to the 
southeast comer of lot No. 1 in WInthrop; thence westerly on the south line 
of said lot so far as to strike a continued line by the east side of No 19 ; thence 
northerly on a line to the northeast corner of No. 19, to Readfleld line ; thence 
eastwardly on said Readfleld line to the southwest comer of lot No. 28 ; thence 
northerly on the west lines of lots Nos. 28, 121, and 122 to the south line of lot 
No. 240 ; thence north northeast to the north line of Readfleld ; thence east- 
terly on said Readfleld line to the first mentioned bounds. Your petitioners fhr- 
ther represent that near the center of the aforesaid vicinity is a small but 
rapidly increasing village'^ f^om which publick roads in almost every direction 
extend through the most fertile and populous parts of the aforesaid vicinity ; 
that in the opinion of your petitioners good order and harmony so essential to 
the well being and prosperity of all civilized society would be essentially pro- 
moted by the incorporation aforesaid ; that the establishment of a Post-office 
at the aforesaid village would be of great importance to a large portion of 
your petitioners, which cannot be obtained without the incorporation 
aforesaid; that no essential injury or inconvenience could arise to any portion 
of onr felloAV-citizens from said incorporation. For these reasons and many 
other considerations which might be mentioned, your petitioners, beiog im- 

u Then generally known as Hallowell Cross Roads. 



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188 



raSTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



pressed with ftall confidence that yoar honors are desirous to promote the 
welfare and happiness of every portion of your constituents and fellow-citizens, 
humbly request that your honors would incorporate into a separate town by 
the name of Naples, — all that part of the aforesaid towns described as 
aforesaid, or otherwise varied as you in your wisdom may deem expedient, 
v^th the privilege of drawing ft-om the several towns such proportion of the 
ministerial lands or ftinds belonging to the same for the support of the minis- 
ters of the gospel in said towns, which your petitioners may be entitled to, and 
also that they may enjoy all the lights, privileges and immunities, usually 
granted to towns at the time of their incorporation, and $Ds in duty bound will 
ever pray. 

HalloweU May 22, 1811. 

Wm. Richards, *♦ 

Thomas Eastman, 

Josiah Prcscott, 

Micajah Dudley, 

John Comings, 

Sam'I Weston, 

Ebenezer Hewins, 

John Bond, 

Eliab Bell, 

Nathaniel Hill, 

Thomas Parker, 

Greorge Waterhouse, 

John Morrill, 

John B. Stevens, 

John Day, 

Lemuel Capen, 

Francis Day, 

Parsons Smith, 

William Winslow, 

Bei\j*n Merrill, 

Joseph Ham, 

Samuel Merrill, 

Wm. Ham, 

Samuel Comings, 

Jabez Gould, 

Elisha Parker, 

David Lothrop. 



Thomas White, 
Benjamin Packard, 
Solomon Eastey, Jr., 
Joel White, Jr., 
Moses White, 
Aaron Eastey, 
Samuel Richards, 
John Richards, 
John Wads worth, Jr., 
John Wadsworth, 
Daniel Stevens, 
Daniel Day, 
Sewel Winslow, 
Isaac Waterhouse, 
Samuel Floyd, 
Sam*l Stevens, 
Nath*l Therstain, 
Thomas Allen, 
Loten Lyon, 
Jotham Allen, 
Abraham Pinkham, 
Jesse Robinson, 
Henry D. Morrill, 
Samuel Comings, Jr., 
Nath'l Comings, 
Ephraim Burgess, 
Abraham C. Lane. 



John Fifleld, 
Abiel Smith, 
George White, 
Job Swift, 
Nathaniel Wing, 
Phinehas Wood, 
Oren Bralnard, 
Asa Connor, 
Jonathan Hains, 
Walter Powers, 
John Briggs, 
William Briggs, Jr., 
Alpheus Lyon, 
Elon Lyon, 
Alpheus Lyon, Jr., 
John Kimball, 
Ebenezer Packard, 
Benjamin Monk,^* 
Richard Hilton, 
John Knowles, 
Timothy Goldthwait, 
Timo. Goldthwait, jr., 
David Mangin, 
Daniel Newman, 
BenJ*n Allen, 
Matthew Randall, 
Ambrose Case. 



Remonstrance of Augusta by its Selectmen. 
To the Honourable Senate and House of Representatives, of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, in General Court assembled : 



^* In the cemetery at the village of Eaat 
Winthrop is a mossy slab of marble bear- 
ing the epitaph: "Wm. Richards, Esq., 
departed this life May 5, 1824, aged 61 
years. Firmly believing he should be 
raised again with the likeness of Him wh^ 



is the Resurrection and the Lif^." Adja- 
cent is a oompanion slab with the inscrip- 
tion : "Mrs. Joanna, wife of Wm. Ricfa- 
aMs, Esq., died May 25, 1843, JEt. 80." 

13 He lived on what is now known as 
Monk's hill, which took its name from him. 



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THE TOWN OP AUGUSTA. 189 

The memorial of the Inhabitants of the Town of Augusta In the County of 
Kennebec, by their selectmen for this purpose especially authorized and In- 
structed, respectfully shcweth that they have been notified of the petition of 
William Richards and others praying that a part of the territory, with the In- 
habitants thereon, within the limits of this town, may be set off and incor- 
porated into a town by the name of Naples. In this petition they perceive, 
with regret, a disposition in their neighbors, and in a few of their townsmen, 
to interrupt and change the limits of this town without an adequate motive. 

At the solicitation of a large majority of the Inhabitants, resident in that 
part of this town described in said Richards' and others' petition, a general 
meeting has been called and held at which the annexed vote was adopted ex- 
pressing the opinion and wishes of the Inhabitants on the subject, and in con- 
formity with this vote are the interest and wishes of nearly all the Inhabitants 
in that section of the town proposed to be taken off. Under these circum- 
stances your memorialists feel it their duty respectfully to remonstrate against 
the granting of the prayer of said petition, so far as regards the town of Au- 
gusta and its Inhabitants, and to shew the following causes, which with many 
others have induced this memorial. The town of Augusta is the Shire of the 
County ; and has within a few years been set off f^om the town of Hallowell ; 
its present extent of territory and population are by no means too great for 
the convenient discharge of municipal duties, and for defhiying our necessary 
expenses ; the nnmber and means of its Inhabitants, united, are but feeble, 
compared with the heavy burthens devolving on them in their attempts to im- 
prove and increase our houses of public worship, school houses, town house 
and other objects of public convenience, and to provide for and relieve the 
poor of our own town, as well as unfortunate debtors who fk'om time to time 
are confined ioT the Commonwealth gaol. 

The town and parish have recently expended a large sum in erecting and 
completing a meeting house ^^ and town house, which have been placed in the 
most cenlfral and convenient situations for the Inhabitants of the town in its 
present form, not anticipating any division of it for many years to come, and 
should that part of the town described in said petition be separated ft'om us, 
it will leave these buildings on the border of the Town, and in situations by 
no means suited to the convenience of the remaining territory. 

Whenever the number of our Inhabitants shall be sufficiently large to re- 
quire a division of the Town it would seem that the convenience of the In- 
habitants and good policy would suggest and require that the river Kennebec 
should form the dividing line, leaving on each side about an equal extent of 
territory. 

In addition to these causes your memorialists would ask the attention of the 
Legislature to the f&ct that of five thousand acres of land petitioned to be 
taken off, the owners and occupants of only seven hundred are in favour of 
the separation, leaving three-fourths of the Inhabitants on the territory op- 
posed in interest and inclination to the measure. 

Your memorialists therefore submit to the wise consideration of the Legis- 
lature, whether under all circumstances it be expedient and proper that the 

u The South Parish meeting-house. 



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130 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



prayer of the petition aforesaid should be granted so far at least as relates to 
this town and its Inhabitants ; whose interest, accommodation and wishes are 
in direct opposition to the measure. Lewis Hamlen, 

Joshua Gagr, 
Pitt Dillingham. 
Selectmen of the town of Augusta. 
Augusta, Maine, December 30th, 1811. 

Hemonstrance of Citizens of Augusta. 

To the Honourable Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled : 

The subscribers, Inhabitants of the Town of Augusta and resident on that 
part of the territory in said town described in the petition of William Rich- 
ards and others, praying that part of the towns of Hallowell, Augusta, Kead- 
field and Winthrop may be incorporated into a separate town, respectfully 
represent that there are but thirty-four families and heads of families residing 
on that part of the territory in Augusta described in said Richards' and others* 
petition, of whom your memorialists are the greater part, who having ma- 
turely considered the reasons and advantages suggested in the petition to in- 
duce a new incorporation, and the Inconveniences and disadvantages which 
would result to the subscribers from such incorporation, feel it their duty to 
remonstrate against the granting of the prayer of said petition, and respect- 
fully shew the following reasons : 

First. The subscribers reside from two to four miles distant from the Town- 
house in Augusta where the town bu2<tlness is uniformly done, and where your 
memorialists usually go to market, purchase their necessary articles of living 
and transact other business which they find convenient to attend to when they 
go to town meetings, trainings, &c., whereas If they should be incorporated as 
petitioned for, most of them will be obliged to travel further than they now 
are, to attend town meetings, &c., and to go to a place where thq^ have no 
other business or concerns to Invite them. 

Secondly. Your memorialists have contributed to the expenses recently In- 
curred in erecting and completing a large and expensive house of public wor- 
ship, and a Town-house in Augusta, Avhere it is most convenient to go to meet- 
ing and where they now have a right to be accommodated, and have very 
lately aided In the settlement of a minister ^^ in this town with whom we are 
well pleased. Should we now be set off to a new and distinct town these 
privileges and benefits will be lost to us. 

Thirdly. Our distance ftom the usual places of military trainings and com- 
pany meetings is not greater at present than we think it must be should the 
new Incorporation be granted as prayed for, and we are confident it is now 
more convenient for us to perform those duties than It would be if we were 
set off to the new town. 

Fourthly. We are situate within three and four miles of the Post-ofllce in 
Augusta, to which we can every day in the course of our business conveniently 

17 Rev. Benjamin Tappan. 



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THE TOWN OP AUGUSTA. 



191 



go or send for papers and letters, but should they be diverted to the con- 
templated new office it would be difficult for any of us to send or get letters 
and papers unless we should go there on purpose ; and lastly, we are unable tO 
discern any advantages or conveniences which would result to us f^om the pro- 
posed incorporation, but we do perceive many and important disadvantages 
and inconveniences which would follow and remain to be suffered by us from 
such a measure. And as we are now as well accommodated as we probably can 
be, and certainly better than we could be by the proposed incorporation, we 
cannot but hope and rely that your honours will not grant the prayer of the 
petition of said Richards and others, at least so far as regards the subscribers 
and the territory on which they reside. Augusta, December 27, 1811. 



Lewis Hamlen, 
Salmon Rockwood, 
Levi Page, 
Cyrus Guild, 
David Craig, 
Lot Hamlen, 
Rufhs Haskell, 
Thomas C. Gage, 
William Briggs, Jr., 



Stephen Page, 
James Page, Jun., 
James Page, 
Levi Page, 2d, 
Timothy Page, 
Jonathan Colliss, 
John Temple, Jr., 
Timothy Goldthwait, 
William Goldthwait. 



Timo. Goldthwait, jr., 
John Briggs, 
Bemsby Caldwell, 
Stephen Caldwell, 
David Sanford, 
Isaac Cottle, 
Elezer Tyler, 
Ebenezer Tyler. 



Bemonstrance of Citizens of Ilallowell, 

To the honorable Senate and to the honorable House of Representatives, in 
General Court assembled : 

Your petitioners, who belong to the town of Hallowell, are desirous in conse- 
quence of an attempt to dismember this town, and to cut off your petitioners 
or else their property from the said town and throw the same into the proposed 

town of Naples ; request that this honorable Court will have the goodness to 

Additional taxpayers, 1 831 . 

Proprietors, Augusta Hotel, Cyrus Gordon, George Nelson, 

Danus Alden, John Gorden, Hiram Nickerson, 

Johnson K. Alien, David Gibson, Simeon Norris, 

Francis Allen, Lather Gorden, jr., Lomuel Nichols, 

Darius Babcuck, Dorcas Gllley, Nathan Oliver, 

James Hrackett, William Gasim, Dean Osgood, 

Benjamin Burbank, Benjamin Holmes, Hugh Owen, 

Elisha Barrows, jr., Joseph Hoskins, Samuel Palmer, 

Ira W. Brown, Ambrose 8. Hammond, John Pope, 

George Briggs, William Hastings, Richard F. Perkins, 

George Black, John H. Hartwell, 2d, John H. Paine, 

Oliver Barret, Isaac Hend3rson, Isaac Porter, 

James Blaisdell, Moses Hatch, George P. Robinson, 

Carrier Brown, Paul Ham, Benjamin Ross, 

Joseph Bigelow, John Ham, George Rogers, 

Asa Bartlett, IchabodH. Ham, Osbom Rines, 

Thomas Bartlett, Robert F. Hall, Paal Stevens, 

Debnry Churchill, Henry C. Hamlen, Jesse Severance, 

Winthrop Cottle, George £. Haskell, Hiram Sanborn, 

Mark Crockett, Thomas Hamilton, John C. Stewart, 

Benjamin Cross, jr., Isaiah Hamlen, William M. Saunders, 

Wm. H. Clark, jr., Charles Hickson, John Souie, 

David Craig, Clark Jewett, Jonathan Sanford, 

Charlotte Clark, Alvah Josselyn, Calvin Spanlding, 

Jeremiah Chandler. David Jordan. Wm. G. Straw. 



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192 



HISTORY or AUGUSTA. 



receive the following as their protest against the said measure ; referring to 
the unanimous remonstrance of said town of Hallowell, passed on the 21st in- 
stant in town meeting, for general reasons on this subject; and meaning only 
humbly to shew by this protest, that the said measure is against their wishes, 
their interest, or their convenience, as individuals. 

And your petitioners will ever pray. 

December, 1811. 

Proprietors of portions of the 
land, to be set off, who reside 
in other parts of Hallowell or 
elsewhere. 
Benjamin Vaaghan, 
Charles Yaughan, 
J. Merrick, 
P. Yaughan, 

Sam'l Carr, Agent for Doctor E. Weld. 
John Megroth, 

Charles Yaughan, Attorney, to Samuel 
Yaughan. 



Residents on the land proposed to be 
set off. 

William Yaughan by his Attorney, P- 

Yaughan. 
John Hesketh, 
Stephen Stantiall, 
Ralph Blake, 
Ebenezer Laughton, 
Levi Wilson, 
Noah Parkman, 
Levi Thing, Junior, 
Harlowe Harris, 
Daniel Hains, 
Paine Wingate, 
Eliab Bell, 
Amos George, 
Daniel Magoon, 
£11 B. Magoon. 

Petition and Bemonstrance of InhahUanta of Hallowell, 
To the Hon*ble the Senate and the Hon'ble the House of Representatives, in 

General Court assembled. 
The petition and remonstrance of the Inhabitants of the Town of Hallowell, 

humbly shew : 



Additional 

PhinehasM 

Jeremiah 

Levi 

Jefferson 

Samuel H. 

Stephen 

Edmund G. 

James S. 

Barnabas 

Stephen E. 

Ariel 

Isaac 

Isaac 

Abraham 

Darius 

Susan 

Robert 

Randall 

Clinton 

Franklin 

Molly 

William 



taxpayertf 1831 
.Chase, 
Coffran, 
Cowan, jr., 
Cleveland, 
Button, 
Deering, 
Doe, 
Dingley, 
Davis, 
Drew, 
DoUoff, 
Emery, 
Foster, 
Fowler, 
Fowler, 
Fisher, 
Fletcher, 2d, 
Fish, 
Fowler, 
Gage, 
Getchell. 
Gorden. 



,— condnded. 
John 
Isaac 
Jacob 
Thomas 
David 
Noble, 
Pliny 

Elbridge G. 
James 
Williams, 
Collins 
William 
Nathaniel 
Joseph 
Samuel 
Samuel 
Robert D. 
David 
Nason, 
William 
Stephen 
James W, 



Kazneau, 

Kingsley, 

Kimball, 

Kennedy, 

Kiucade, 

Kittredge & 

Lyon, 

Lincoln, 

LawBon, 

LawBon & 

Lovejoy, 

Little, 

Lovejoy, jr., 

LawsoD, 

Lord, 

Morse, 

Mosher. 

Marshal. 

Moody & 

Moore, 

Mayo, 

North. 



Moses 

Henry B. 

John 

Henry 

Thomas O. 

Mann, 

Giiman 

Richard 

Eben 

Oliver 

Daniel 

Ellas S. 

Jeremiah 

Milliken, 

Stephen 

Ammi 

Benjamin 

James W. 

Turner 

James W. 



Smart, 

Smith, 

Sprague, 

Shattuck, 

Saunders, 

Tappan & 

Turner, 

Tobey, 

Trask, 

West, 

Woodward, jr. 

Whitney, 

Wardwell, 

Webster & 

WiUey, 

West, 

Whitehouse, 

Young, 

Wyman, 

Watchers. 



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THE TOWN or AUGUSTA. 193 

That pursDant to an order of notice which was directed to be published by 
your Honorable Court, the inhabitants of the said town of Hallowell were 
duly convened on the twenty-first day of December, 1811, and to.ok into consid- 
eration the petition of William Richards and others, to which the said order 
of notice referred ; praying that a certain division of the said town of Hal- 
lowell may form a part of a new incorporation by the name of Naples; and 
voted unanimously^ that in their opinion it would be injurious to the interest 
of the town to have the prayer of the petition granted. 

1. It does not appear that the petitioners suffer any inconveniences which 
are not generally felt by the remote parts of all towns. The place where the 
town-meetings are held is as nearly central as possible ; and to it the peti- 
tioners have an excellent rpad. 

2. The militia companies are arranged according to common usage ; and as 
several of the petitioners belong to the troop of horse or company of Artillery, 
they are subject to less than common inconvenience. 

3. As to public worship they suffer no peculiar hardship. A few years ago 
the incorporation of a religious society took place in the vicinity of the 
petitioners, whose house of worship is about a mile distant ft'om them. They 
availed themselves of the provision of that Act; and disconnected themselves 
flrom the central part of the Parish of Hallowell; and since the establishment 
of the aforesaid society, no tax has been required or received from any of the 
petitioners for the support of publick worship at the old meeting-house. 

4. The petitioners have the convenience ot four Post-offices within five miles 
of their little village; and have the further benefit of travellers constantly 
passing towards them all. However, if the General Government can perceive 
any adequate advantage to induce them to grant the petitioners the accommo- 
dation of another, the inhabitants of this town will offer no objection.** 

6. Nothing can be discerned in the mere circumstance of two roads crossing 
each other where the petitioners reside to justify their claims; because there 
is a shorter road ft'om Farmington laid out, accepted, and partly made, which 
will cross the Winthrop and Augusta road about a mile to the eastward of 
their settlement. The completion of that road will impoverish the present 
village; and anew settlement being formed at the new Fork, another appli- 
cation for a similar object may be expected to follow. 

B. If a collection of twenty contiguous families in any part of a town affords 
a pretence for a separate incorporation, the peculiar structure of this town 
will expose it to a ftirther dismemberment. 

7. The town of Hallowell was originally laid out ten miles square : But the 
incorporation of Augusta took away more than three-ttfth parts of that area. 
To which it may be added, that in most cases where a town has been laid out 
on both sides of the Kennebec, subsequent convenience has caused the River 
to be made a ftiture boundary. Whenever the population of the eastern part 
of the township requires that division to be set off, the obvious convenience of 
such an arrangement will prevent opposition to it ; and whenever that incor- 
poration takes place the dimensions of the town of Hallowell will be reduced 

IS The Post-office of Hallowell Cross Roads, was established January 1, 1818, 
with Jesse Robinson, postmaster. 

13 



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194 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



to three and a half miles by five miles ; or little more than eleven thousand 
acres. The anticipation of this certain event affords an unanswerable objection 
to the prayer of the petition ; for if the bounds designated therein are under- 
stood, it is intended to cut off about half its present extent on the western 
side of the river. 

8. By granting the prayer of the petition, by far the most important avenue 
to the village of Hallowell will be placed under the control of another town ; 
and so important has this avenue been regarded, as to induce the Selectmen 
to expend upon it for many years, more of the taxes paid by other inhabitants 
than equals the whole amount of the taxes paid for the same object by the 
petitioners. And thus after having engrossed our land, the petitioners would 
be able to control our trade. 

9. Nor can we perceive the grounds upon which the petitioners assert the 
"rapid growth of their flourishing village," whether we regard its trade, pro- 



Additional taxpayers f 1832. 

Cornelius Allen, 

Joel Allen, 

Alexander Baboock, 

Theodore S. BaUard, 

Freeman R. Baker, 

John Battles, jr., 

OliToi S. Beale, 

Erastas Bartlett, 

Dole, Brinsmade & 

PascaLl S. Bronsdon, 
Burgess, 
BnrgesB, 
Berry & Co., 
Berry, 
Chandler, 
Chick, 
Chid, 
Chisam, 
Churchill, 



Ephraim 

Gorham 

Ira 

Stephen A. 

John 

Hiram 

James L. 

William H. 

Samuel C. 

Harrison G. Clark, 

Aaron Clark, 

Benjamin C. Clark, 

Benjamin Colcord, 



Wiley 

Mark 

John 

Abner 

Seward B. 

William 

Loring 

Bailey, 

David B. 

A/J^lliam 

Joseph P. 

Hannah B. 

George 

William 

Alfred 

Samuel W. 

Nathaniel C. Dutton, 

Abiel Fish, 

Henry Flint, 

Hozea Foye, 

Henry W. Fuller, jr., 

Abigai Gage, 

Partridge & Gale. 



Crawford, 

Crockett, 

Crosby, 

Coombs, 

Coombs, 

Cutler, 

Cashing, 

Clapp & 

Davenport, 

Davis, 

Dillingham, 

Dillingham, 

Dillingham, 

Do3, jr., 

Do3, 

Drew, 



Stephen 

John C. 

Abiel L. 

Benj. 

Thomas B. 

Isaac F. 

Benj. N. 

Abner G. 

James 

Elisha 

Moses E. 

Charles H. 

Samuel 

Jonathan 

Hiram H. 

John 

T. A. 

Sumner 

Widow 

James 

John 

Henry A. 

John 

John 

Moses C. 

James 

Daniel 

Albert G. 

Alva J. 

Hannah 

Roby K. 

Patrick 

John 

Joseph 

Joseph 

Joseph G. 

William 

Tucker, 

Benjamin 

Samuel 

Josep hW. 

George 

Moses 

John R. 

Foxwell F. 

AbelB. 



Gale, 

Garland, 

Getchell, 

GstcheU, 

Gibbs, 

Gllley, 

Guild, 

Gutterson, 

Hall, 

Hallett, 

Hamlen, 

Hamlen, 

Herrin, 

Hibbard, 

HiU, 

Holt, 

Holway, 

Hopkins, 

Howard, 

Howlette, 

Hussey, 

Jones, 

Jewett, 

Kayford, 

Kellam, 

Keith, 

Knight, 

LawBon, 

Libbev, 

Littlefield, 

Linnell, 

Maboney, 

Marston, 

Marston, 

McLaughlin, 

Moodv, 

Malhali, 

Morton & 

Newman, 

Palmer, jr., 

Patterson, 

Perkins, 

Pollard. 

Percival. 

PettengiU, 

Pierce. 



Jonathan H. 

John 

Samuel C. 

Allen 

Asa 

Samuel 

David 

Daniel 

Elijah 

Samuel E. 

Robert 

Martha L. 

Charles 

Luther 

Joel 

Jacob 

Daniel C. 

Thomas 

Alfred 

David 

Thomas 

Nicholas 

Charles F. 

John 

Ammi M. 

John W. 

James 

Isaac N. 

Stephen 

Stephen 

Elbridge 

-Jflunes 

Joseph 

Sereno S. 

Thomas 

David L. 

George 

James W. 

William 

Charles 

Charles J. 

Jeremiah 

Salmon 

David 



-Pierce, 

Pitts, 

Pratt, 

Putnam, 

Redington, jr. 

Richards, 

Robinson, 

Rumney, 

Robinson, 

Remick, 

Sager, 

Smith, 

Snell, 

Snell, 

Spanlding, 

Stanwood, jr., 

Stanwood, 

Stevens, 

Spears, 

Sinclair, 

Sewall, jr., 

Slater, 

Town, 

Trask, 

True, 

Thorns, 

Thurston, 

Tucker, 

Tucker, 

Tozier, 

Towle, 

Umphrey, 

Underwood, 

Webster, 

Whitten, 

Wilson, 

Wilson, 

Williams, 

Washburn, 

Waterhouse, 

Wingate, 

Wyman, 

Willey, 

Young, jr. 



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THE TOWN OF AUGUSTA. 



195 



perty or population. At this time there Is bat one store (and that in a langnid 
state), where a few years ago there were three, in active employment. It ap- 
pears from the records of the town that in the year 1804 it consisted of thirteen 
families and foar singlemen, and that in the year 1811, it contained within the 
same space seventeen families and six singlemen. And it fhrther appears by 
the said records, that they paid last year (1811) a property tax to the State of 
seven dollars and sixty-eight cents and no more. 

We cannot therefore suppress our astonishment, that a small village, ap- 
parently declining in business and in wealth can have attempted to persuade 
your honorable Court to cut off for their imaginary convenience A'om the town 
of Hallowell, upwards ot seven thousand Acres of its best land, not one-seventh 
part of which belongs to the said petitioners. 

And your Petitioners will ever pray. 

A true copy of record, As certifies, John Sewall, Town Clerk. 

There are several other documents relating to this matter which are not 
copied here, viz : 

(1) Order of hearing on W. Richards* petition, to be published In the 
American Advocate, printed in Hallowell. June 13, 1811. 

(2) Protest of committee chosen at town meeting of Readfield, llth of 
November, 1811. After giving reasons against the incorporation of the proposed 
new town, the protest concludes : — "N. B. the division as above proposed 
would divide one of our Military Companies about In two equal parts and 



Additional taxpayers, 1833. 
Oeorge W. Allen, 
Dexter Arnold, 

John Avery, 

Samael Bolton, 
Renel Brackett, 

William Brackett, 
George Berry, 

A. K. Bryant, 

Edwin W. Carter, 
John T. Carter, 
Henry Caldwell, 

P. Coleton, 

Hiram Coy, 

Stephen Crosby, 
Gershom CroBS, 
Robert A. Cony, 
John A. Chandler, 
Alfred Davis, 

Simon Dearborn, 

Carleton Dole, 
John L. Dntton, 
William A. Dalton, 
Isaiah £mery, 

William T. Folsom, 
Samuel Farrar, 
Benjamin Field, jr., 
Ebenezer H. Famham, 
Johnson W. Foster, 



Edward 

SethB. 

William 

Ira 

Joseph F. 

Nathaniel 



Fenno, 

Goodwin, 

Goff, jr.. 

Gray, 

Gannett, 

Green. 



John 

John 

Robert 

Samuel K. 

L. H. 

John H. 

Levi 

Moses 

William H. 

Joseph S. 

John 

Charles W. 

Joseph D. 

Harvey 

Eliab 

Lot 

Jared 

Philip 

James H. 

John E. 

Snmner 

Bennet 

Charles 

Edward A. 

Philip 

Thomas K. 

Rafus K. 

Caleb 

Gardiner 

Asa 

Dennis 

Isaiah 

Caleb 

Gilbert 



GUman, 

Greenleaf, 

Hutchinson, 

Hodgkinson, 

Hamlen, 

Hnssey, 

Johnson, Ist, 

Kenniston, 

Kittredge, 

Leavitt, 

Lampson, 

Leighton, 

Lord, 

Lowell, 

Lyon, jr., 

Myrick, 

McFarland, 

Mayers, 

Mariner, 

Mariner, 

Marston, 

Mooers, 

Mellon, 

Nason, 

Norcross, 

Noble, 

Page, 

Packard, 

PhUlips, 

Phillips, 

Partridge, 

Piercs, 

Philbrook, 

Pullen. 



James > 

Benjamin F. 

William 

Moses 

Dudley 

William 

Daniel 

Benjamin 

James 

John 

George W. 

Ephraim 

Mark 

Albert 

Gilman 

Samael S. 

Samuel 

Samuel E. 

Shubael 

David E. 

James A. 

David 

Samuel 

Benjamin 

John 

Stephen 

Edward I. 

John M. 

Davis 

Evi 

George G. 

Widow 



Riggs, 
.Riggs, 
Rice, 
Rackliff, 
Robey, 
Rollins, 
Robinson, 
Rust, 
Rines, 
Shaw, jr.. 
Shepherd, 
Smith, 
Springer, 
Stackpole, 
Sleeper, 
Smith, 
Steward} 
Smith, 
Seely, 
Towle, 
Thompson, 
Townsend, 
Trask, 
Trask, 
Turner, 
Vamev, 
White', 
Webster, 
WiUey, 
Wills, 
Wilder, 
Whiting. 



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196 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

said Company in the present state is not too numerons." Signed by John 
Hubbard, Luther Sampson, Samuel Currier, Levi Johnson. December 23d, 
1811. 

(3) Remonstrance of Town of Readfleld, forty-flve signers, headed by John, 
Hubbard. December 23d. 1811. 

(4) Remonstrance of Reuben Brainerd and twelve others of Winthrop. 
December, 1811. 

(5) Winthrop, signed by Alexander Belcher and Joseph Metcalf, Selectmen. 
January 8th, 1812. 

(6) Report of committee. Reference to next session. February 8th, 1812. 

(7) Leave to withdraw on petition of William Richards. June 12th, 1812. 

September 10, 1814. Voted that a committee be appointed to take into con- 
sideration the alarming situation of the country ; and George Crosby, Joshua 
Gage, John Davis, Thomas Rice, Pitt Dillingham, Williams Emmons, and 
Joseph Chandler, Esquires, were chosen. The committee, after withdrawing 
a short time, returned and reported the following votes, which were adopted 
unanimously by the town, viz : Voted that the selectmen of the town be era- 
powered and directed to procure forthwith, two hundred pounds of powder, 
such quantity of materials for tents, and such number of camp-kettles and 
small arms, as in their Judgment may be necessary and proper. Voted, also, 
that the sum of 9500 be raised and appropriated, to deftly the expense which 
may arise f^om the foregoing vote. Voted that John Davis, Joseph Chandler, 
George Crosby, Henry W. Fuller, and Jesse Robinson, Esquires, be a com- 
mittee of safety and correspondence.** 

May 20, 1816. On the following question, to wit: Shall the Legislature be 
requested to give its consent to the separation of the District of Maine iVom 
Massachusetts proper, and to the erection of the said District into a separate 
State? Votes given in for the question, 245; against it, 24. The whole num- 
ber of qualified voters were 348. 

September 2, 1816. The freeholders and other inhabitants of the town duly 
concerned in town meeting, did elect John Davis, Esq., and Hon. Nathan 
Weston, Jr., Esq,.**' delegates to meet in convention on the last Monday of 
September, instant, at the meeting-house, near the College in Brunswick. 

On the question : Is It expedient that the District of Maine shall be sep- 
arated from Massachusetts and become an independent State? Upon the 
terms and conditions provided in an act entitled, '*An act concerning the sep- 
aration of the District of Maine from Massachusetts proper." Votes given in 
for the question, 258 ; against it, 39. 

March 3, 1817. Voted to authorize the' selectmen to purchase a hearse for 
the use of the town. 

19 Ssptember 19. In September, 1814, See the Chapter on the military history of 
the war with England still continains?, oar the to>vn in the second volume of this work, 
town was filled with troops from abroad ^^ Selectmen's order No. 47, dated Jane 
and our own citizen soldiers ander the 1, 1818, "in favor of Nathan Weston, Jan., 
command of General Sewall went to the fdr his sen-ices as Delegate to the Brans- 
relief of their neighbors at Wiscasset who wick Convention [1816] , as per accoant on 
were threatened with an invasion by the file, $26.'* Order No. 113, dated January 
British forces at the month of the Sheepscot 10, 1820, in favor of John Davis, for same 
river. (MS. of Daniel Williams, 1830.) service, ^26. 



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THE TOWN OP AUGUSTA. 197 

May 1, 1817. Voted to raise the sura of two haodred dollars in addition to 
the sum raised for the current expenses of the Town to enable the selectmen 
to furnish seed to such persons as cannot get it for themselves, upon their 
giving security, that it shall be sowed or planted, and paid for after harvest.'* 

March 2, 1818. Voted that in order to prevent the practice of coasting or 
sliding on the public streets in this town, it is expedient for the town to raalte 
and establish the following by-law, viz : That each and every person who shall 
coast or slide with a sled, sleigh, plank, or board in either of the following 
streets in the town, viz: the street leading ftrom the ferry way [town landing] 
to Captain Joshua 6age*s house [Rines* hill], the street leading from the 
Court-house to Water street [Court street hill], the street leading from the 
gaol to the river [Winthrop-hill], and the street leading from the meeting- 
house to the Kennebec bridge [Bridge- hill], — shall forfeit and pay the sum of 
one dollar for each and every breach of this by-law, to the use of the poor of 
the town. 

April 6, 1818. Voted that the subject of James Weston keeping a private 
school in the town-house, be referred to the selectmen, who were authorized 
to act in behalf of the town. 

April 5, 1819. Voted that the selectmen together with the town agent, be 
authorized and empowered to sell the whole or any part of the lot of land 
granted to the town by the Plymouth Company, called the ministerial lot, on 
such terms as they may think most for the interest of the town, and in behalf 
of the town to execute, acknowledge and deliver a deed or deeds thereof. •• 

May 3, I8l9. Voted that the upper room of the town house be granted for 
the introduction and accommodation of a Lancasterian School, ^ about to be 
established in this town. 

July 26, 1819. On the question : Is it expedient that the District of Maine 
shall become a separate and independent State, upon the terms and conditions 
provided in an act, entitled *'An act relating to the separation of the District 
of Maine from Massachusetts proper, and forming the same into a separate 
and independent State?" The whole number of votes given in were three 
hundred and forty-two, at which two hundred and ninety-three were in favor 
of the separation, and forty-nine votes were against said separation. 

September 20, 1819. Pursuant to proclamation of His Excellency John 
Brooks, Governor [etc.], the freeholders and other inhabitants of the town of 
Augusta, qualified to vote for senators, assembled in town meeting and did 
then and there elect the Hon. Daniel Cony, the Hon. Joshua Gage, and the 
Hon. James Bridge, delegates to meet delegates from other towns within the 

^ May 1. The coldness of the sammer tem of instruction was brought to this 

of 1816 had deprived the fanners generally country in 1818 by Joseph Lancaster (1771- 

of a sufficient amount of ripened grain for 1838), an Englishman and a professional 

sowing and planting the following spring ; educator. The distinctive feature of his 

hence the action of the town in furnishing method was mutual instruction, the more 

needed assistance. advanced scholars of a school serving as 

22 See vote of town-meeting, March 10, monitors and teachers to the younger pn- 

1783, and note. pils,— the whole school being under the di- 

38 May 3, 1814. The Lancasterian sys- rection of a principal. 



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198 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

District of Maine, in convention at the Coart-house in Portland in the County 
of Camberland, on the second Monday of October next [to form a State Con- 
stitQtion]. 

December 6, 1819. At a legal meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Au- 
gusta, holden for the purpose of giving in their votes in writing, expressing 
their approbation or disapprobation of the constitution prepared by the con> 
▼ention of delegates, assembled at Portland on the second Monday of October 
last,*^ pursuant to *'An act relating to the separation of the District of Maine 
f^om Massachusetts proper, and forming the same into a separate State ;** the 
whole number of votes given in were counted in open meeting of the town, by 
the selectmen who presided at said meeting, and were eighty-one , of which 
eighty were in favor of the constitution prepared by the convention as afore- 
said, and one was opposed to said constitution. 

April 3, 1820. The inhabitants gave in their votes for a Governor, and the 
same were received, sorted, counted and declared in open towm meeting by 
the selectmen who presided, and in presence of the town clerk, who formed a 
list of the persons voted for, and made a record of them as follows, viz : For 
William King, 152; for Daniel Cony, 9S; for Samuel S. Wilde, 2; forReuel 
Williams, 2; for Robert C. Vose, 2; for Daniel Williams, 2; for Nathaniel 
Bodwell, 5 ; for Theophilus Ladd, 1 ,* for Daniel Hartford, 1. 

M The Maine Constitutional Convention. Reported by Jeremiah Ferley. Editions of 

1820 and 1894. 



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CHAPTER VIII. 
OBSEQUIES OF WASHINOTON. 



It is not easy to-day after the passing of a century to appre- 
ciate fully the profoundness and universality of the sorrow that 
fell upon the people of this country when the great Washington 
died at Mount Vernon, his home on the bank of the Potomac, 
December 14th, 1799.i 

The masterly general who had led the revolutionary armies to 
victory and made good the Declaration of Independence, and 
whose career in the civil service of the new republic was no less 
illustrious, was deeply enshrined in the hearts of his grateful 
countrymen and was regarded with filial reverence throughout 
the land. He had been the mighty staff upon which the people 
leaned amid the dreadful gloom of war during the birth throes 
of their pqlitical liberty. President Adams issued a proclama- 
tion recommending that the birthday of his lamented predeces- 
sor — February 2 2d — be devoted to memorial obsequies in all 
of the States of the Union. 

The intelligence of the country's bereavement reached the re- 
mote hamlet of Augusta by due course of mail on the 1st day 
of January, 1800 ; the inhabitants were deeply impressed by 



1 The impnsgion of this afflictive event is 
without a paraliei in the annals of Amer- 
ica. It was spontaneons and unaffected 
grief, which nothing, but the loss of the 
Father of his Ck>nntr7, conld have excited. 
The Senate and House of Representatives 
in Congress resolved, that a marble monu- 
ment be erected by the United States, in 
the Capitol, at the city of Washington, and 
that the family of General Washington be 
requested to permit his body to be deposited 
under it ; and that the monument be so de- 



signed, as to oonmiemorate the great events 
of his military and political life. *^ Agree- 
ably to other resolutions and recommenda- 
tions of Congress, a funeral oration was 
delivered by one of its members (Major- 
general Lee), in honor of the memory of 
general Washington, before both houses ; 
and the people of the United States wore 
crape on the left arm, as mourning, 
thirty days." — American Annali, by Ahiel 
IlolmeSt Cambridgey 1805 ^ Vol, ll^pa^e 
500. 



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200 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



the melancholy event, and, moved by the spirit of the hour, the 
voters met in public meeting on the 6th of February to take 
formal action in consonance with the president's prochimation. 
At this meeting there were chosen Henry Sewell, Peter T. Vose, 
George Crosb}^ Samuel Coleman, William Brooks, James 

Additional taxpayers, 1834, 



Thomas 

Joseph 

William 

David 

Amos 

Greenleaf 

Daniel 

William 

Gideon 

Ira 

Oeorae 

E. H. 

S. 

Virf^il 

Carlton S. 

Joseph S. 

Joseph 

Holway 

Oliver 

Charles N. 

George 8. 

Caleb 

Henrv L. 



Atheam, 

Anthony, 

Allard, 

Atkins, 

Adams, 

Barrows, 

Bnswell, 

Brings, 

Barton, 

Berry, 

Borgess, 

Bryant, 

Barrister, 

Ballaid, 

Bragg, 

Berry, 

Barrett, 

Brown, 

Bishop, 

Bates, 

Carpenter, 

Carter, 

Carter, 



Emerson F. Carter, 
Ebenezer Caldwell 
Henry K. 
Joseph L. 
Thomas C. 
Caroline 



Pnllen, 

Moses 

Joshaa 

M. A. 

Jedediah 

Benjamin 

Nathan 

Lewis O. 

William 

F. G. 

Richard 

James 

Morrill 

Syivanns 

Charles 

Eben 

Martha 

Dennis 

Lewis 

Jonathan 

Mary 

Charles F. 

Jonah 

William N, 

David 

Eben 

John 

John 



\yaiuwon, 

Chadwick, 

Chase, 

Chick, 

Chadwick, 

Clark & 

Cummings, 

Coombs, 

Chandler, 

Cates, 

Castis, 

Crowell, 

Cowan, 

Colley, 

Cooke, 

Chick, 

Coburn, 

Corson, 

Caldwell, 

Carroll, 

Clark, 

Curtis, 

Conway, 

Davenport, 

Dearborn, 

Datton, 

Dutton, 

Dnnn, 

Dow, 

Doe, jr.. 

Doe, 

Eldridge, 

EUery. 



William 


Fellows, 


Margaret 


North, 


Alvan 


F^banks & 


Isaac 


Newcomb, 


Wyman, 


B.8. 


Newhall, 


Barnabas 


French, 


Joseph S. 


Page, 


George 


Fish, 


Isaac 


Pray, 


Pollard, 
Leonard 


Flagg & 


Tilly 


Pray, 


Farrington, 


Sarah 


Piper, 


Henry A. 


Fairfield, 


Simon 


Pratt, 


Kichaid 


Furbush, 2d, 


B. 


Philbrook, 


Lewis 


Gordon, 


Harrison N.Pike, 


Arthur L. 


Getchell, 


Angalus 
Isaiah 


Pease, 
Robbins, 


Thompson, 


Goodrich & 


Renel 


Goodwin, 


Greenleaf 


Rockwood, 


Charles 


Go wen. 


J. M. 


Ramsey, 


William H 


. Goddard, 


W. 


Randall, 


RoscoeG. 


Green, 


Benjamin 


Remsell, 


Jesse 


Gordon, 


Seth 


Rines, 


James 


Howlett, 


Greenleaf S. Rogers, 


Joseph 8. 


Hamlen, 


Samuel S. 


Rogers, 


Joshna L. 


Heath, 


AsaC. 


RandaU, 


Isaac 


Horn, 


Lemuel F. 


Rich, 


William R 


. Humphreys, 


Eben 


Ryerson, 


Ellis, 


Howard k 


Albert 


Stevens, 


Joshua B. 


Hartford, 


Joseph 


Stanley, 


Lemuel S. 


Hubbard, 


Joshua 


Southwick, 


Turner 


Huntoon, 


Levi 


Smart, 


Athniel 


Hammond, 


Simon 


Scates, 


Benjamin 


Hodges, 


L. C. 


Swett, 


John 


Hoyt, 


Obadiah 


•Sawtelle, 


Samuel 


Hutchings, 


Charles 


Shaw, 


Thomas 


Hobart, 


John 


Sanborn, 


Theodore S 


. Ingraham, 


Dean 


Swift, 


George W. 


Jones, 


Daniel A. 


Sparhawk, 


Eben 


Jenkins, 


Wm. R. 


Smith, 


Philip C. 


Johnson, 


Zachariah 


Springer, 


Austin 


Jackson, 


Ladd, 


Tappan & 


Michael 


Kazneau, 


Thomas 


Townsend, 


John 


Kendrick, 


William 


Thompson, 


John 


Lancaster, jr.. 


Isaac 


Thompson, 


Joseph 


Lampson, 


Bradbury 


Thomas, 


Taber 


Lyon, jr.. 


Stillman 


Thorp, 


Jonathan 


Laughton, 


Samuel 


White, 


Jonathan C 


.Low, 


ElbridgeG 


. Wyman, 


Loyal 
John S. 


Lovejoy, 
Leighton, 


Trufant, 
Daniel 


Wingft 
Waldron, 2d, 


Joseph E. 


Ladd, 


Daniel 


Weston, jr.. 


Warren 


Loud, 


Elbridge G. Woodside, 


Sewall 


Lancaster, 


Calvin G. 


Whitney, 


George W. 


Macomber, 


Hiram 


Wilson, 


Ezra 


Morey, 


C. C. 


Wilcox, 


John H. 


Moore, 


Rufus 


Whitten, 


Pliny 


Moore, 


Abner 


Woodsum, 


John 


McDonald, 


S. W. 


Widdington, 


John 


McDada, 


Levi 


Wyman, 


James T. 


McCobb, 


Jason 


Young, 


Thomas C. 


Noble, 


Hiram 


Yeaton, 
Yates & 


George W. 


Nichols. 


Presoott, 



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OBSEQUIES OF WASHINGTON. 



201 



Bridge, and Benjamin Whitvvell, to be a committee of arrange- 
ments for the appropriate observance of February 2 2d, com- 
memorative of the transcendent career of the departed patriot. 
The committee performed its allotted service vigorously and 
well, and elaborate preparations were made for the ceremonies 
of the occasion. Benjamin Whitwell was selected as the orator ; 
a procession was to be the leading featui*e. Upon the arrival 
of the 22d, the inhabitants assembled from all parts of the 
town and from the neighboring towns, at the meeting-house 
which was located on what is now Market Square, where the 
procession was formed in the following order. 



Additional 

Abial D. 

DanieL 

Foxwell 

G^rge 

Oliver 

Jeremiah 

Angnstus 

James 

Catharine 

Henry D. 

William 

A. K. 

R. W. G. 

David M. 

William H< 

M. 

R. and E. 

E. and D. 

William 

Daniel 

Ethel 

Silas 

William J. 

James 

Silas 

Charles F. 

Francis 

Stephen 

Thos. B. 

William H. 

William M. 

Alonzo 

JohnH. 

Nehemiah 

Benj. O. 

8. H. 

Daniel A. 

Isaac 

Samnel L. 

Simeon 

Jeremiah 

Bnmham C. 

Sumner 

Oreenleaf 

William S. 



taxpayers f 1835. 

Bacon, 

Bailey, jr., 

Beck, 

Blake, 

Blood, 

Bragg, 

Brick, 

Brooks, 

Brown, 

Bnsh, 

Burgess, 

Bryant, 

Brown, 

Carson, 
. Chisam, 

Clark, 

Cony, 

Cony, 

Connor, 

Cottle, 

Cummings, 

Curtis, 

Condon, 

Clongh, 

Danforth, 

Dalton, 

Davis, 

Deering, 

Dickman, jr.. 

Doe, 
, Durrill, 

Dexter, 

Eveleth, 

Ellis, 

Field, 

Fairbanks, 

Fairbanks, 

Gage, 

Getchell, 

Goodwin, 

Goodwin, 
, Greeley, 

Green, 

Hallowell. 

Haskell. 



Joseph 
Brian 
Cyril 

Alexander 
Dillingham, 
John 
H. R. 
Lucius P. 
Benj. F. 
Norcross, 
Isaac H. 
Samuel 
Robert 
John 
James 
Henry 
Samuel 
Berry, 
Henry 
Rufus 
John 
Joseph 
Athiel 
James 
Zeno 
Charles 
Elijah 
William 
Lewis D. 
Thomas 
Samuel 
Edmund D. 
Rainsford 
Moses 
Edward P. 
William A. 
Gilbert H. 
William 
Stephen 
Jefferson B, 
Vassal D. 
Joseph 
WiUiam 
Warren 
M. A. 



Ham, 

Hall, 

Hartwell, 

Hatch, 

Hatch k 

Harvey, 

Hemenway, 

Hayward, 

Horton, 

Humphreys & 

Hunt, 

Hawes, 

Hutchinson,jr. 

Hubbard, 

Humphrey, 

Jackson, 

Jackson, 

Jenkins & 

Johnson, 

Kendrick, 

Kinsman, 

Knowlton, 

Knowles, 

Keegan, 

Kelley, 

Lancaster, 

McFarland, 

Maxwell, 

Moore, 

Murphy, 

McDavid, 

Norcross, 

Norcross, 

Noble, 

Norton, 

North, 

0*Reilley, 

Orrak, 

Packard, 

Pierce, 

Pinkham, 

Piper, 

Place. 

Pullen, 

Pullen. 



Edmund 

Phinney, 

Eben 

James S. 

Michael 

Andrew L. 

WUliam R. 

Joseph 

John 

Aaron 

George 

Emellne 

Joseph 

William 

Jacob 

Samuel P. 

Bradbury C. 

Jonathan 

Thomas 

William 

Harrison 

William M. 

Benj. 

Giles 

Gowjng, 

Buckley, 

Reuel 

Knowlton, 

Luther I. 

Daniel 

Wm. S. 

El bridge 

Perkins, 

Asa 

Joseph W. 

Joseph H. 

Deering, 

George 

James 

Lemuel H. 

Micah 

William 

E. D. 



Pray, 

Dennis & 

Packard, 

Pitts, 

Powers, 

Perkins, 

Prescott, 

Remick, 

Richards, 

Richardson, 

Robinson, 

Rock wood, • 

Rollins, 

Sawin, 

Saunders, jr., 

Shaw, 

Shaw, jr., 

Shaw, 

Smith, 1st, 

Spears, 

Stone, 

Stratton, 

Stickney, 

Tarbell, 

Thomas k 

Thomas & 

Townsend, 

True & 

Wall, 

Wills, 

Wills, 

Wiggins, 

Wheeler & 

Wilbur, 

Williams, 

Williams, 

Wing & 

Winslow, 

Woodward, 

Woodward, 

Woods, 

Woods, 

Willey. 



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202 



HI8TOBY OF AUGUSTA. 



1. A Military Escort (under command of a vetenin non- 
commisMioned officer). 

2. Thirteen Young Ladies^ representing the thiileen Colo- 
nies. Their eoBtame or uniform consisted of a white dress, 
black mantle, white scarf fastened on the right shoulder with a 
black and white rosette ; tied under the left arm, with long ends 



Additional tazpayer$, 1836. 



Wm. H. 


Allen, 


BohanC. 


Grean, 


John W. 


Arnold, 


Dudley 


Greeley, 


AlMon K. 


' Arnold, 


Sylvanns A. Hammond, | 


Sidney 


Arnold, 


Othniel 


Hammond, 


James M. 


Axtell, 


ElUha 


Si^ii^' 


Joseph 


Bailey, 
Baldwin, 


Thomas H. 


Cyrus 


William C. 


Havward, 


Solon 


Beale, 


Randolph 
Wm. H. 


Heath, 


Jonathan 


Bennet, 


Heath, 


Eliab 


Blake, 


Jonas G. 


Holcomb, 


William 


Bassford, 


Wm.E. 


Harry man, 


John 


Barnes, 


Samuel B. 


Hodgkins, 


^ohn 


Barker, 


Samuel 


Homans, 


Heman L. 


Blood, 


Sanford 


Howard, 


Israel 


Bloodgood, 


EbenH. 


Hunt, 


Nathaniel 


Briggs, 


Nathaniel 


Hutchins, 


Henry D. 


Buck, 


William 


Hussey, 


Ira 


Buck man, 


Philip 


Hubbard, 


Samuel G. 


Bums, 


Dam Co., 


Kennebec, 


Kbenezer G 


. Brown, 


John 


Keagan, 


IraH. 


Bamham, 


Samuel 


KeeS, 


Anslem 


Carey, 


Simon 


Keith, 


James 


Carson,! 


Amasa 


Kelley, 


James 


Cates, 


Thomas 


Lambard, 


Nelson 


Carter.^ 


Lewis 


Leffman, 


William 


Campbell, 


Larkin M. 


Leland, 


Benjamin 


Church, jr., 


Joseph F. 
William 


LawBon, 


Hiram 


Churchill, 


Lawson, 


Wm. M. 


Clark, 


Prince B. 


Lewis, 


Wra. L. 


Clark, 


Walter 


Libby, 


John 


Colbum, 


Nathaniel 


Littlefield, 


Jonathan 


Cochran, 


Joseph 


LowSll, 


Abel 


Cole, 


Harvey 


Miller 


Crowell, 


Collins 


Lovejoy, 


Nathaniel 


Cross, 


Ezra 


Lyon, 


George W. 


Dearborn, 


William 


Lyon, 


Charles S. 


Dextor, 


Johnson 


Lunt, 


David 


Dimn, 


John 


Marshal, 


David 


Dyer, 


James 


Mason, 


S. W. 


Eiliot, 


Abner 


McDonald, 


James 


Elliot, 


John 


McGraw, 


Kzekiel 


Elliot, 


DaniBl 


McGraw, 


Benjamin 


Emerson, 


John 


Moses, 


Joseph J. 


Eveleth, 


Isaac H. 


Moore, 


CaldweU, 


Eveleth & 


Albert 


Mills, 


John 


Ilfield, jr.. 


Silas S. 


Morey, 


William 


Farley, 


Hamlen, 


Nason k, 


James 


Fairbanks, 


William S, 


Nason, 


Elijah 


Farnham, 


Baile;^, 


Nason & 


Wm. P. 


Fowler, 


Nath'l 


Nason, 


John 


Gardiner, 


Luther 


Oliver, 


Jesse 


Gav, 


David S. 


Page, 


John 


Gilley, 


Georjfe 


Parcherft Co., 


Charles 


Gordon. 


Henry 


Palmer. 



Joseph A. 

William T 

SylTanns C. 

William B. 

Samuel P. 

Phinney & 

Daniel 

Hiram 

Richard D. 

Norcross, 

William 

Rust, 

Edward 

Charles 

Jabez 

Charles 

Isaiah 

John 

J. M. 

Thomas 

James 

Edward 

Thaddeus 

Geo. W. 

John 

Mercy 

Wm. 

Albert 

Fanny 

Robinson, 

Archibald 

Charles 

Keziah 

Peleg 

Joseph H. 

Ezra I. 

Henry F. 

Stephen 

James F. 

Henry 

James 

James 

George 

wmiam 

Uriah 

Mark 

WiUiam 

Josiah P. 

Miss 

Joseph 

Nancy 

James W. 



Pbrkina, 

Pierce, 

Phinney, 

Pierce, 

Raisted, 

Packard, 

Proctor, 

R«ed, 

Rice, 

Richards & 

RoweU, 

Safford & 

Savage, 

Savage, 

Sawin, 

Sawyer, 

Sawtelle, 

Shaw, 

Smiley, 

Smith, 2d, 

Smith, 

Southwick, 

Snell, 

Stanley, 

Staine, 

Stackpole, 

Stevens, 

Stinson, 

Springer, 

Smith & 

Thompson, 

Wade, 

Wadsworth, 

Wall, 

Wall, 

Wateon, 

Webster, 

Weeks, 

Weeks, 

Wellman, 

Wildes, 

Williams, 

Wing, 

Woods, 

Woods, 

Wyman, 

Wyman, 

Yates, 

Young, 

Young, 

Young. 



jr.. 



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OBSEQUIES OF WASHINGTON. 



203 



falling to the bottom of the dress; black beaverhat, turned up 
at the sides. 

1. Jane Black, dau. of James and Abigail (Pollard) Black. 

2. Esther Bond, daa. of Thomas Bond ; she was b. Jan. 13, 1784, and d. Oct. 
10, 1810, unmarried. 

3. Hannah Bond, dau. of Thomas Bond; she m. in 1811, Angastus Alden, 
lawyer, who lived in Augasta for awhile and d. in Hallo well in 1850. 

4. Ann Child, dau. of James Child. She d. at Calais. 

5. Paulina Cony, fourth dau. of Dr. Daniel Cony ; she m. in 1809, Nathan 
Weston, Jr. ; she d. Sept. 11, 1857. 

6. Sarah Cony, third dau. of Dr. Daniel Cony ; she m. in 1807, Reuel Wil- 
liams, and d. Oct. 17, 1867. 



Additional 




. 








Charles A. 


Allen, 1 


Isaiah M. 


Furbush, 
GUpatrick, 


Hazen 


Osgood, 


Abraham C. Arnold, | 


John T. 


James H. 


Patterson, 


John C. 


Anthony, 


Cyrus 


Guild, jr., 


Bethnel 


Perry, 


Joseph R. 
William 


Abbott, 


Benjamin 


Gaslin, 


Luther 


Packard, 


Anderson, 


David L. 


Gupta, 


Dennis, 


Piper & 


Horace 


Bowditch, 


John E. 


Gardner, 


Joshua D. 


Pierce, 


Charlotte 


Brown, 


William 


Green, 


Joseph 


Pray, 


Joseph 


Baker, 
Blanchard, 


John 


Gray, 


Zenns 


Perry, 


Charles 


William B. 


HartweU, 


Isaac 


Perry, 


John 


Bamet, 


John 


Hastings, 


John C. 


Pickard, 


Samael 


Babcock, jr., 


LibbeuB 


Hayward, 


Daniel T. 


Pike, 


Jacob 


Britt, 


Ezra 


Hawkes, 


Joseph S. 


Powers, 


William R 


Bolton, 


Perez 


Hanilen> 


James 


Porter, 


Daniel 


Beedy, 


Jonathan 


Hedge, 


Marcus 


Read, 


Noah 


BickneU, 


Henry 


Hobbs, 


WiUiam 


Rice, jr.. 


Sumner S. 


Brick, 


Moses H. 


Harlow, 


Columbus 


Richardson, 


John W. 


Brown, 


John 


Hoxie, 


George 


Safford, 


Martha L. 


Curtis, 


Hartshome Harrington, 


Hendrick 


Smart, 


Henry A. 


Caldwell, 


Ebenezer 


Hunt, 


Purington, 


Southwick& 


James 


Cross, 


George 


Haley, 


Addison 


Stlnchfield, 


Thomas 


Colby, 


Beniah P. 


Ingraham, 


Gilman 


Smith, 


William 


Caldwell, 1st, 


Cary 
William T 


Jones, 


Joseph H. 


Smith, 


Thomas 


Chandler, 


Johnson, 


George W 


. Sylvester, 


Levi 


Collins, 


Jacob 


Kaznear, 


Thaddeus 


Snell, jr.. 


Watson 


Carr, 


John 


Keene, 


Benjamin 


Simpson, 


John E. 


Carlton, 


William 


Kennedy, 


Thomas 


Saunders, 


Russell B. 


Campbell, 


J. W. 


Kilbume, 


James 


Safford, 


B. 


Carter, 


John D. 


Lord, 


William 


Saunders, 


Abner 


Coombs, 2d, 


Silas 


Leonard, 


John D. 


Smith, 


Samael 


Cole, 


Joseph L. 
Charles S. 


Lemalphe, 


Stanwood, 


Thompson & 


Joseph 


Crommet, 


Leeman, 


William 


Thomas, 


Francis 


Davis, jr.. 


LeviG. 


Leeman, 


James 


Tremble, 


Rachel 


Dick man, 


George 


Longley, 


Samuel 


Thompson, 


John C. 


Day, 


RufusH. 


Longley, 


Joseph S. 


Thompson, 


Asa 


Decoster, 


W. R. 


Lougee, 


Perkins, 


Vamey& 


F. W. 


Dearborn, 


Mrs. Betsey Mclntire, 


Joseph 


Woodward, 


James 


Dealy, 


Benjamin 


Melvin, 


Jeremy 


Wyman, 
WiUey, 


Edward H 


. Edes, 


Dr. Wm. 


McLellan, 


Charles 


James 


Elliot, 


Albert G. 


Mauley, 


Simon 


WiUey, 


Leonard 


Ellis, 


Thomas 


Miller, 


George 


White, 


Samuel 


Folsom, 


Patrick 


McPhelemy, 


J. 


Wiggins, jr., 


Daniel C. 


Fuller, 


Stewart 


MiUs, 


Willard 


Wolcott, 


Foxwell C 


Fletcher, 


John 


McDavid, 


Daniel C. 


Weston, 


E. A. 


Fairbanks, 


Francis 


Nickless, 


Daniel L. 


Wyman, 


Nancy E. 


Fairbanks, 


William 


Nutting, 


Nathan 


Webster, 


Joel 


Femald, 


Hiram 


Norcross, 


James 


Walton, 


Aaron L. 


Folson, 


Thomas 


Neal, 


Harvey 


Young. 


Jeremiah 


Furbuflh. 


Daniel 


Ormsby. 







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204 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA, 



7. Hannah Craig, dan. of Elias Craig of Augusta and subsequently of Fay- 
ette; she m. in 1809, Bartholomew Nason, and d. Oct. 16, 1832. 

8. Esther Gould, dau. of Capt. Benj. Gould of Newburyport, Mass. ; she m. 
in 1806, Henry W. Fuller; Chief Justice Melville W. Fuller of the United 
States Supreme Court is a grandson ; she d. July 26, 1866. 

9. Sarah Hamlen, dau. of Theophllus Hamlen; shem. In 1811, Joseph Ladd. 

10. Abigail Sewall, dau. of Henry Sewall; she m. in 1809, Eben Dutch of 
Augusta. 

11. Betsey Soule, dau. of John Soule, innholder; she m. a Mr. Thurlow. 

12. Hannah Page. dau. of Ezekiel Page; she m. in 1806, Frederic Wingate, 
and d. March 28, 1864. 

13. Sarah Williams, dau. of Capt. Seth Williams; she m. in 1815, Charles 
Williams of Augusta, and d. March 28, ld44. 

3. A While Standard (encircled with black and representing 

an urn with the initials G. W., borne by two lads, Charles 

Sewall and W. Coleman). 



Additional taxpayerSf 1838, 
Horace A. Andrews, 
Jonathan S. Barrill, 
Chandler fieale, 
Joseph L. Beck, 
James Bicknell, 

John Blanchard, 

Benjamin P. Blair, 
Samuel G. Burgess, 
Arthur Blish, 

Sarah Branch, 

James 8. Brackett, 
Abraham Brackett, 2d, 
Bradford T. Carter, 
Elbridge G. Caswell, 
Jeremiah Chandler, 
William Chamberlain, 
Phineas W. Chadwick, 
John F. Child, 
Lnther A. Church, 

Clark, 

Cleavland, 

Cooley, 

Cooke, 

Crantz, 

Doe, 

Dunn, 



John 

Elias 

Horace S. 

John H. 

Frederic C 

Josiah 

Richard 

William H. Duttoh, 

Daniel Eaton, 

John Eason, 

Russell F. Ellis, 

Clifford, Emerson & 

Ephraim C. Fairfield, 



James 
Leonard 
N. D. 
John 
Luther 
Adams 
Andrew D. 
Caldwell, 
William H. 
Hadley & 
Solomon 
Reuel 



Foster, 

Glidden, 

Gordon, 

Gorman, 

Gordon, jr., 

Godfrey, 

Hall, 

Hamlen & 

Haskell, 

Hollis, 

Hall, 

Hawes. 



Chisam, 

Levi 

John 

Ambrose 

Solomon T. 

Sylvester, 

L. M. 

Edward " 

Moore, 

James 

Daniel 

Elizabeth 

H. A. 

John A. 

Cyrus 

Henry H. 

Daniel 

Jeremiah 

Leonard k 

L. W. 

Almon H. 

David 

David 

Stephen 

Moses 

Joseph 

Mrs. 

Henry 

Jason 

Bartlett, 

Jayne 

John 

John 

Samuel 

John 

Charles 

Andrew L. 

U.L. 

Henry A. 

Benjamin 

John S. 

Jonathan 

James G. 

Almira 



Hawes k 

Hicks, 

Hilton, 

Hovey, 

Honghton, 

Josselyn k 

Jndkins, 

Judkins, 

Johnson & 

Keene, jr., 

Keene, 

Kimball, 

Kitteridge, 

Kllbume, 

Knapp, 

Knowles, 

Ladd, 

Lamson, 

Lovejoy, 

Lithgow, 

Lyon, 

Lynn, 

Lynn, jr., 

Mayers, 

Marshall, 

Mason, 

Mellen, 

Morrell, 

Moore, 

Morton k 

Morse, 

Mnlliken, 

Nason, jr., 

Nesbit, 

Page, 

Parker, 2d, 

Parker, 

Pettengill, 

Petteugill, 

Philbrick, 

Philbrick, 

Pierce, 

Prescott, 

Prescott. 



Deane 


Pray, 


Isaac 


Pressey, 


Samuel 


Randall, 3d, 


James W. 


»i 


Leighton, 


Wall, 


Riggs k 


John H. 


Rice, 


Elbridge 


Rideout, 


Elijah 


Robinson, 


Roxanna 


Rockwood, 


Nicholas H 


.Roberts, 


A.D. 


Sawver, 


Jonathan 


Safford, 


Wm. M. 


Sannders, 2< 


Hannah 


Sanford, 


Charles 


Sherman, 


EbenB. 


Sibley, 


Samuel 


Snow, 


Joseph 


Southard, 


Eleazer H. 


Smith, 


J.W. 


Smith, 


Augustus C. Smith, 


Martin 


Smith, 


WUliam A. 


Springer, 


Nathaniel 


Stevens, 



David 

John C. 

Robert 

Albert 

Allen 

Leonard 

John 



Starrett, 
• Stewart, 
Studley, 
Stone, 
Taber, 
Taylor, 
Vamey, 



Caroline G. Vose, 
Clement I. Ward, 
John Warren, 

Levi Warren, 

Horace Waters, 
Reb3cca G. Webster, 
Sullivan H. Weston, 
George M. Weston, 
Francis J. Weeks, 
David I. Whittier, 
Deering, Wing k 
Rowse, Wingate. 



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OBSEQUIES OP WASHINGTON. 



205 



4. The Male Youth of the Town Schools^ followed by two 
Schoolmasters. 

5. Company of Infantry^ Militia (Captain Cass ; with 
muskets reversed, marching by the left in inverted sections). 

6. Martial Music (drums muffled, instruments draped in 
mourning). 

7. Company of Artillery^ Militia (Captain Bowman; with 
small aims reversed, marching by the left in inverted sections). 



A iditional taxpayers f 1840, 



Joseph R. 


Abbott, jr., 


R. E. 


Lyman 


Abbott, 


Charles 


James 


Abbott, 


Charles 


Thomas 


Adams, 


John N. 


Paul S. 


Adams, 


Edward B 


Robert 


Annable, 


Susan B. 


Colambas 


Arnold, 


Samuel 


William 


Atkins, 


Francis 


Joseph C. 


Aspinwall, 
Aikins, 


Samuel 


Edward H 


McCobb 


James 


Aiken, 


Theodore 


Ephraim 


Anderson, 


George 0. 


Nathaniel 


Acton, 


Abraham 


Lincoln 


Baker, 


Bowman 


Thomas S. 


Bartlett, 


William 


Lory 


Bacon, 


Abel 


Charles H. 


Ballaid, 


Orchard 


Willard 


Bailey, 


James 


Cyrus 


Baldwin, 


Horatio 


Abial D. 


Babcock, 


Charles 


Lewis 


Batchelder, 


Lewis 


Huntington Battles, 


John 


Samuel 


Bennett, 


Noah 


Arthur W. 


Berry, 


Elizabeth 


Thomas H 


Beck, 


Benj. F. 


Amo A. 


Bittnes, 


Thomas 


Henry 


Blake, 


Benj. S, 


John 


Blake, 


John 


Sarah 


Bowman, 


William 


Chandler 


Branch, 


Burrill G. 


SethP. 


Bragdon, 


James 


Warren 


Brown, 


John 


Joseph P. 


Burbank, 


A. B. 


John M. C 


. Burbank, 


Wm. M. 


Nathaniel 


Bassel, 


John 


Francis 


Bntson, 


Thomas 


Joseph 


Burton, 


Levi 


John 


BurriU, 


Daniel 


Charles 


Brown, 


Jacob G. 


Matthew 


Butterlleld, 


William 


Nathaniel 


Bacon, 


Augustus 


William 


Brownell, 


James 


Elias 


Brow^nell, 


Patrick I. 


WMlllam 


Blake, 


James S. 


Ashur 


Bums, 


Daniel 


AlvanS. 


Babcock, 


Wm. S. 


Greenleaf 


Brown, 


Joseph 


Laon 


Bushee, 
Chadwick. 


Moses 


Daniel 


James 0. 



Clark, 

Clark, 1st, 

Clark, 2d, 

Clifford, 

Cony, 

Cony, 

Crommett, 

Crowell, 

Cummlngs, jr. 

Cushing, 

Carter, 

Crawford, 

Capers, 

Cooper, 

Crossman, 

Cain, 

Cook, 

Conner, 

Caswell, 

Caswell, 

Card, 

Cain, 

Carson, 

Chandler, 

Chandler, 

Church, 

Church, 

Chapman, 

Chase, 2d, 

Davis, 

Davis, jr., 

Dow, 

Duren, 

Doe, 

Doe, 

Dulon, 

Davis, 

Dav, 

Da'v, 

Day, 

Douglass, 

Devine, 

Devine, 

Davis, 

Daley, 

Daley, 

Delainaire, 

Deshon. 

Eaton. 



A.T. 

Thomas H. 

James 

John 

Enoch 

Robert 

Peter 

Jeremiah 

Thomas 

Benj. A. G. 

Abner 

Eli 

Jas. O. L. 

Ephraim 

Catherine 

Parker 

William 

Sumner W. 

Wm. H. 

Jeremiah 

Daniel 

Caleb 

Henry 

Stephen D. 

S.P. 

Henry 

Samuel 

Samuel 

William M. 

Leonard 

Hugh 

Abraham 

Michael 

Margaret 

Francis A. 

James Y. 

Henrv 

John'N. 

A. H. 

John R. 

Jane 

Samuel L. 

Franklin A. 

John 

Lorenzo D. 

Daniel 

Stephen 

Alfred 

Nehemiah 



Ellis, 

Ellis, 

Emery, 

Emery, 

Emerson, 

Ewers, 

Feran, 

Fisk, 

Fuller, 

FuUer, 

Fogg, 

French, jr„ 

Foster, 

Fogg, 

Fitzpatrick, 

Fletcher, 

Gav, 

Getchell, 

Getchell, 

Goodrich, 

Goldthwait, 

Gordon, 

Griffin, 

Gilly, 

Gardiner, 

GuUifer, 

Gill, 

Gill, jr., 

Godfrey, 

Grant, 

Galiker, 

Gil bear, 

Gillev, 

Hamlen, 

Hall, 

Hadley, 

Harris, 

Hartwell, 

Hayward, 

Haley, 

Howard, 

Harris, 

Hewins, 

Heath, 

Hewett, 

Hilton, 

Higgins, 

Hiscock, 

Hilt. 



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206 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



8. The Kennebec Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons j of 
Hallowell (insignia in mourning, two tapers burning and one 
extinguished). 

9. Orator (Benjamin Whitwell). 

10. Clergy (Rev. Daniel Stone and Rev. Eliphalet Gillet of 
Hallowell). 

11. Judges of Courts. 12. Civil Magistrates, 13. Laio- 
yers and Physicians. 14. Committee of Arrangements. 15. 
Selectmen. 16. Military officers (xwMmfovm). Yl.FireCom- 
pany. 18. Citizens. 

At the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon, to the strains of 
solemn martial music and amid the booming of minute guns 
fired by a detachment of artillery, the several bodies — feminine, 
military and civic, — moved afoot in imposing procession to the 
town landing, and thence across the river by the w-inter road 
on the ice to the eastern side ; there it marched in sentimental 
review before Fort Western whose genesis was associated with 
the war in which the immortal deceased gallantly engaged dur- 
ing the early years of his military career. After this act of 
homage — rendered ostensibly to the old fort for what it had 
been, but incidentally to a few families living in that aristocmtic 



Additional 

Joseph A. 

WUliam H, 

Issacher 

Nathan 

Thomas 

Josiah 

Benjamin 

Oliver 

A. and H. 

Charles 

Benjamin 

Edmund 

Michael 

Patrick 

Comfort S. 

Greenleaf 

Ishial T. 

Tracy C. 

Sherbnme 

Daniel 

Reuel 

Samnel 

James 

William 

Henry 8. 

Charles W, 

Levi 



ttugmyeraf 1840,- 

Homan, 
. Hovey 

Holmes, 

Hovey, 

Homans, 

Humphrey, 

Huntington, 

Hall, 

Hunter, 

Hume, 

Holmes, 

Hickey, 

Hickey, 

Hiland, 

Hussev, 

Haskell, 

Holmes, 

Howes, 

Heath, 

Hilton, jr., 

Jacobs, 

Judkins, 

Johnson, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Jones, 

Johnson, 2d. 



, — continued. 



Peter 


Jenness, 


Jonathan 


Patrick 


Kelley, 


Israel 


James 


Keene, 


Samuel 


John 1. 


Kilbume, 


William 


Mitchell 


King, 


Daniel 


Stephen S. 


Knowles, 


T. B. 


John 


Kincaid, 


Hugh 


Thomas I. 


Knox, 


John 


Michael 


Kivvick, 


Antoine 


Franklin B 


.Ladd, 


Hu^h 
Michael 


Sarah 


Ladd, 


James L. 


Lambard, 


Swaney 


Leonard 


Landers, 


William 


Dorothy 


Lambard, 


Abner 


Hannah P. 


Lambard, 


Samuel 


Wm. A. 


Larrabae, 


John 


Silas S. 


Lemont. 
Leonard, 


James C. 


Solomon 


John M. 


Watson, 


Little & 


WiUiam 


Jene 


Lines, 


Hiram 


Ephraim 


Leighton, 


Nathaniel 


William 


Leary, 


Lewis P . 


Charles 


Lovejoy, 


Ansel 


John 


Lothrop, 


Crowell 


Charles 


Lothrop, 


Edward 


Zachariah 


Longlev, 
Lynn, jr. 


John F. 


Joseph 


JohnF. 



Lowe, 

Lovett, 

Livermore, 

Lynch, 

Lynch, 

Levery, 

McKibb, 

Mclntire, 

Murray, 

Meldony, 

Mahony, 

McGraw, 

Manning, 

Mason, 

Marriner, 

Marshal, 2d, 

Marson, 

McLaughlin, 

McLaughlin, 

McCausland, 

Meigs, 

Mead, 

Merchant, 

Merchant, 

Merrill, 

Miller, 

Miller, jr. 



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OBSEQUIES OP WASHINGTON. 



207 



precinct of the village,^ — the procession reorossed the river 
via the Kennebec bridge whose gates for this occasion by the 
courtesy of the shareholders were opened toll-free ; the route 
of inarch continued down the road to Market Square — the place 
of l>eginning ; here the parade ended, and the thirteen fair alle- 
gorical maidens in uniform followed by the less attractive resi- 
due of the procession, filed into the meeting-house to participate 
in the indoor exercises. The pews and galleries and aisles were 
soon filled by an orderly and expectant throng of more than a 
thousand people, and many desired admission who could not be 
gratified. The Meeting-house itself was di-aped with emblems 
of mourning. 

The services began with a funeral anthem ; Rev. Daniel Stone, 
the South Parish minister, offered prayer ; this was followed by 
the " sadly pleasing melody'* of human voices singing an appro- 
priate hymn ; next, the orator of the day pronounced the 
eulogy, which "exhibited in a masterly manner the moral, 
political and religious features of the departed Washington ;" ^ the 
Rev. Eliphalet Gillett, offered prayer, and the exercises closed 
with a benediction by Parson Stone. The congregation then 
dispersed ; the militia companies re-formed and according to the 
tactics marched off by the jight with unmuffled drums beating 
to the music of the President's March. 



* The present Bowman street which 
crosses the ancient fort yard between the 
fort house and the site of its southwestern 
flanker, had not then been made. The road 
leading from the ferry landing was east- 
ward of the fort and a section of it is still 
preserred under ihe name of Howard street 
— ^between Williams and Cony streets. The 
citizens who then lived in the ylcinity of the 



fort and near whose residences the proces- 
sion passed, were: Thomas Bowman (in 
the fort), John Brooks, William Brooks, 
Daniel Cony, Samuel Howard, Arthur 
lithgow, Henry Sewall, Peter T. Vose, 
Robert Williams. 

» Diary of Henry Sewall. The eulogy 
was printed in a pamphlet by Peter £des. 



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CHAPTER IX. 

THE PURRINTON TRAGEDY. 

There never was a local event that filled the people of Augusta 
with greater horror than the Purrinton tragedy. A respected 
citizen of amiable qualities and of apparently serene life, suddenly 
became a ferocious homicidal maniac, and after dealing deadly 
blows to every member save one of his large family ended in his 
frenzy by his last act his own wretched life. The tidings of the 
awful deed reached the villagers and spread from household to 
household throujajhout the town and to the neicchborins: towns 
ere the twilight of the sad summer morning had wholly faded. 
The citizens shuddering suspended their usual labors ; the 
farmer dropped his scythe in the unfinished swath, the ti-ader 
abandoned his store to the care of hisyouthful clerk, the mechanic 
and artisan laid down their working tools ; — all hastened to the* 
public resorts to learn the grewsome details of the dreadful 
crime ; or wended their way in groups and straggling proces- 
sions northward over Andros hill ^ to the fearful scene of the 
butchery. The intensity of the public emotion admitted no de- 
gree of compassion for the poor crazy wretch whose hand had 
wrought the catastrophe and whose body unlike those of the 
other victims was excepted from Christian burial, in accordance 
with the spirit of an ancient colonial law,^ and the prevailing 

1 Andros bill, so named for George any time be foand by any jury to lay vio- 
Andros, wbo first lived upon it as early as lent bands on themselves, or be wilfully 
1797, and who died in 1808. guilty of their own death, every such per- 

2 An act against self-murder. This Court, son shall ba denied the privilege of being 
considering how far Satan doth prevail buried in the common burying place of 
upon several persons within this jurisdic- christians, but shall be buried in some 
tion to make away themselves, judgeth that common highway, where the selectmen of 
God calls them to bear testimony against the town where such person did inhabit 
such wicked and unnatural practices, that shall appoint, and a cartload of stones laid 
others may be deterred therefrom ; Do upon the grave as a brand of infamy, and 
therefore order ^ that from henceforth, if as a warning to others to beware of the like 
any person, inhabitant or stranger, shall at damnable practices.— Co/ony Lawa^ 1660. 



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THE PURRINTON TRAGEDY. 209 

sentinient of the time. For weeks and months and years the 
tragedy remained vivid in the remembrance of the community, 
and decades elapsed before it ceased to be the sombre subject 
of oft repeated comment. 

The perpetrator of the deed which in its diabolism has never 
yet been surpassed in the histoiy of Maine, was James Purrinton, 
a new-comer and a comparative stranger in the town ; he had 
removed the year previous (1805) from Bowdoinham to Augusta 
and settled on a farm situated about two and one-half miles from 
the village, on the Belgrade road. His * father had deceased 
leaving him a handsome inheritance, and he was considered by 
his acquaintances "a rich and independent farmer.** He was 
forty-six years old, and had a wife, an amiable woman of forty- 
five, a native of Bath, whose maiden name was Betsey Clifford ; 
their children were : 

Polly, aged 19 years, Anna, aged 10 years, 

James, aged 17 years, Nathaniel, aged 8 years, 

Martha,^ aged 15 years, Nathan, aged 6 years, 

Benjamin, aged 12 years. Louisa, aged 18 months. 

It is said that Purrinton was a man of grave countenance and 
reserved manners, and obstinately tenacious of his opinions ; that 
his mind dwelt much on religious subjects, that he was changeful 
in his beliefs but finally adopted the doctrine of univei-sal sal- 
vation ; that he was kind and aflectionate in his family and a 
good neighbor ; he was observed at times to be elated or de- 
pressed as his affairs were prosperous or otherwise ; he was great- 
ly diistressed because of a prevailing drought, and expressed a 
fear that his han''est would be small, his cattle starve, and his 
family suffer from want. On Sunday, three days before the 
massacre, Purrinton having sharpened a knife, stood before a 
looking-glass in the presence of one of his daughters, apparantly 
preparing his throat for its use ; this so alarmed her that he 
calmly replied to her terrified questions and laid the knife aside ; 
the mother, upon her return home from public worehip, being 
informed of the incident and that her husband had written a 

> Martha was remoyed on a bier to the Comer) where she painfally lingered until 1 
honse of Jonathan Ballard (at Ballard's her death July 30th. 

14 



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210 



HI8TOBT OF AUGUSTA. 



letter previous to sharpening the knife, was filled with the most 
alarming apprehensions, search was made among the family 
papers and a letter found addressed to his brother, in which was 
written : *•! am going on a long journey ;" the letter gave di- 
rections as to the disposition of his property and the education 
of his children, and enjoining the brotiier"to be sure to give 
them learning if it takes all, — divide what is left, for I am no 
more." This letter so overaime the wife that she was wi^tched 
and inconsolable ; the husband endeavored to allay her fears by 



Additional taxpayers, 1840,- 


- concluded. 


Nathaniel 


Mitchell, 


James W. 


Emery 


Moulton, 


A. G. 


Isaac H. 


Moore, 


Erastns 


Samael 


Morrell, jr.. 


B. F. and J. 


Cornelius B. Morton. | 


Lewis P. 


William 


Moore, 


Orren 


John 


Morgan, 


Rebecca 


Renben 


Moore, 


John B. 


Moses 


Morrell, 


James 


Benj. F. 


Morse & Co., 


Edward 


Edmund 


Merrow, 


David G. 


Isaac 


Mason, 


Joshua 


Andrew 


McCriUis, 


Josiah 


Albert 


Mills, 


John 


Wallace 


McKenney, 


Renben 


Hiram 


Miirriner, 


Smith 


Josiah 


McFarland, 


Benj. C. 


Peter 


Ma<?uier, 


Benjamin 


John 


Murphy, 


Timothy 


Joshua 


Neal, 


Patrick 


Mrs. 


NeweU, 


Isaac M. 


John H. 


Norcross, 


Gill man 


Moody 


Norcross, 


Alphonso 


William 


North, 


Chas. W. 


Ha%en 


Osgood, 


Isaac 


D. V. B. 


Ormsby, 


David • 


Olive 


Partridge, 


Alfred 


Henry 


PW, 


David 


John C. 


Page, 


Samnel 


Wm. A. S 


Paine, 


George 


Samnel 


Patterson, jr.. 


John B. 


Ebenezer 


Packard, 


Lemuel 


Sidney 


Packard, 


Ansel 


Bdnjamin 


Perkins, 


Simuel 


James B. 


Perkins, 


Joseph 


Nathaniel 


Perkins, 


Joseph 


OrviUe 


Peck, 


Sylvester 


Shubal 


Pease, jr.. 


Alonzo 


Daniel 


Pease, 


Charles 


Jonas 


Proctor, jr.. 


Chest 3r 


J.G. 


Phinnev, 


Benjamin 


James P. 


Philbrook, 


Henry S. 


Charles 


Prescott, 


Lemu3l 


Barnard 


Porter, jr., 


Chestar S. 


Chas. 


Plummer, 


Horace 


David 


Pollard, 


Charles H. 


John 


Pouler, 


Waldren 


Samnel 


Pike, 


Brian 


Samnel 


Rackliff, 


Tillin'?hast 


Marcus y. 


Reynolds. 


WiUiam H. 



Remick, 
Reed, 
Richards, 
.Rto8, 
Ripley, 
Ring, 
Roberts, 
Rowse, 
Rogers, 
Rowse, jr., 
Robinson, 
Rollins, 
Rollins, 
Rollins. 
Randall, 
Rowe, 
Robinson, 
Ricker, 
Rabbit, 
Rooney, 
Sargent, 
Sanborn, 
Sawtelle, 
Safford, 
Safford, 
Safford, 
Sawyer, 
Savage, 
Scribner, 
Scates, 
Shaw, 
Sherman, 
Shorey, 
Shaw, 
Shaw, 
Simonds, 
Simonds, 
Smiley, 
Simmons, 
Spencer, 
Span, ding. 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Sparhawk, 
Stackpole, 
Springer, jr., 
Stacy. 



Nathan 

Moses M. 

James S. 

Henry P. 

Warren 

John 

Daniel 

Elijah D. 

James 

Charles 

Alexander 

Hiram 

Ai 

Wm. R. 

Dorr, 

Benjamin 

Joseph 

John 

Mary 

Elias 

B.N. 

Brown 

Edward B. 

James 

William 

William H. 

George 

Wm. 

Wm. 

Geo. F. 

Leander 

Martin 

James N. 

John F. 

Sewall 

Reuel 

William 

A. R. 

William H. 

John 

Thomas 

David W. 

Sarah 

John 

Joseph 

Isaac 

Jesse 

Simuel 

Nathan 



Stanwood, 

Swan, 

Stevens, 

Stevens, 

Stone, 



lend 
Savage, 
Sullivan, 
Stratburg, 
Shaw, 
Savage, 
Staples, 
Smith & Co., 
Severance & 
Stickney, jr., 
Stilcott, 
Sweeney, 
Savely, 
Taylor, jr., 
Thorns, 
Thurston, 
Thome, 
Tibbetts, 
Tibbetts, 
Titcomb, 
Turner, 
Trask, 
TarbeU, 
Talbot, 
Trask, 
Ward, 
Wad3, 
Wade, 
Watson, 
West, 
Weeks, 
Webb, 
Wheeler, 
Wheeler, 2d, 
White, 
Whitney, 
Wheeler, 
WiUey, 
Wilson, 
Wight, 
Wilson, 
Wooster, 
Woodwiurd. 



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THE PURRINTON TRAGEDY. 211 

the positive assurance that he did not meditate suicide, but at 
the same time informed her that he had a presentiment that his 
death was near. These manifestations of the taint of insanity that 
was hereditary in his family did not awaken in the wife a thought 
of the real impending danger ; with no apprehension of the terri- 
ble paroxyism that was soon to seize him, the mother and chil- 
dren retired to rest as usual on the evening preceding the fatal 
morning of July 9th. 

The local newspaper grapliically summorized the ghastly 
details of the tragedy, and published them on a broadside, dole- 
fully illustrated with jack-knife cuts of eight closed coffins, and 
broad mourning rules. 

It is tnidition that the cart was tipped backward and the 
coffined body contemptuously dumped into the grave. It is 
also tradition that during the night following the burial the body 
was disinterred and carried to Brunswick for the benefit of the 
medical school connected with Bowdoin College.^ The burial of 
the mother and children was in one capacious grave dug in the 
easterly part of the cemetery, near the powder-house ; no perma- 
nent memorial was erected over it, and all knowledge of its 
precise location is now lost. 

Elias Craig (1756-1837) , the coroner, immediately summoned 
a jury of inquest which was composed of the following named 
citizens : 

Ephralm BiUard, Jr. (1779-1829.) KendaU Nichols. (1768-1829) 

Samuel Bond. (1782-1809.) Ezsklel Page. (1746-1830.) 

James Child. (1762-1840.) Jonathan Perkins. (1779-1855.) 

John Eveleth, foreman. (1772-1848.) Shubael Pitts. 

Theophilus Hamlen. (1766-1842.) Oliver Pollard. 

Caleb Heath. Frederic Wingate. (1781-1864.) 

{Bro<»dnde published by Peter Edee of the local newspaper.) 
Horrid MurdkrI 
Augusta (Kennebec), July 1 1, 1806. At an early hour on Wednesday morning, 
July 9, the Inhabitants of the town were alarmed with the dreadful Information, 
thatCapt. James Purrlnton, of Augusta, in cool blood, had murdered his wife, 
six children, and himself, — his oldest son, with a slight wound, escaped, and 
his second daughter was found desperately wounded, and probably supposed 

* It is more probable that the friends of and remoTed the body for ro-borial at Bow- 
the anfortnnate family secretly disinterred doinham with theur kindred. 



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212 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

dead by the father. Between the hours of 2 and 3, a near neighbor, Mr. Dean 
Wyman, was awakened by the lad who escaped with an incoherent account of 
the horrid scene Arom which he had Just fled; he with a Mr. Ballard, another 
neighbor, instantly repaired to the fatal spot, and here, after having lighted a 
candle, a scene was presented which beggars all description, — in the outer 
room lay prostrate on his face, and weltering in his gore, the perpetrator of 
the dreadAil deed — his throat cut in the most shocking manner, and the bloody 
razor lying on a table by his side. In an adjoining bed-room lay Mrs. Purrin- 
ton in her bed, her head almost severed ftom her body ; and near her on the 
floor, a little daughter about ten years old, who probably hearing the cries of 
her mother, ran to her relief from the apartment In which she slept, and was 
murdered by her side. In another apartment was found the two oldest and 
the youngest daughters, the first, aged 19, dreadfully butchered ; the second 
desperately wounded, reclining her head on the body of the dead infant 18 
months old, and in a state of horror and almost total insensibility. In the 
room with the father lay in bed with their throats cut, the two youngest sons, 
the one eight, the other six years old, — and in another room was found 
most dreadfully mangled, the second son, aged twelve ; he had fallen with 
his trousers under one arm, with which he had attempted to escape ; on the 
breastwork over the flre-place, was the distinct impression of a bloody hand, 
where the unhappy victim probably supported himself before he fell. The 
whole house seemed covered with blood, and near the body of the murderer 
lay the deadly axe. From the surviving daughter we have no account of this 
transaction; her dangerous situation prevents any communication, and but 
faint expectations are entertained of her recovery. From the son, age 
seventeen, we learn the following: That he was awakened by the piercing 
cries of his mother, and involuntarily shrieking himself, he leapt f^om his bed 
and ran towards the door of his apartment ; he was met by his father with an 
axe in his hand (the moon shone bright) who struck him, but being so near 
each other, the axe passed over his shoulder and one corner of it entered his 
back, making a slight wound ; his father then struck at him once or twice and 
missed him ; at this moment his younger brother, who slept in the same bed 
with him. Jumped from it and attempted to get out at the door; to prevent 
this the father attacked him, which gave the eldest an opportunity to escape. 
Daring this dreadful conflict, not a word was uttered. From the appearance 
of the wounds generally, it seems to have been the design of Furiinton to dis- 
sever the heads from the bodies, excepting the two youngest, whose throats it 
is supposed were cut with a razor. The oldest daughter and second son had 
several wounds, the probable consequence of their resistance. We have no evi- 
dence to lead us satisfactorily to the motives for this barbarous and unnatural 
deed. Capt. Purrinton was forty-six years of age, and had lately removed 
ftom Bowdoinham to this town — an independent farmer, with a handsome 
estate, of steady, correct, and industrious habits, and of a good character and 
fair reputation, and strongly attached to his family. He had been heard lately 
to say, that he felt much distressed at the unpromising appearance of his 
farm ; that he should be destitute of bread for his family, and hay for his 
cattle, and dreaded the consequences. The Sunday before his death, it is said, 



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THE PURBINTON TRAGEDY. 



213 



he wrote to his brother, and informed him that on the reception of the letter 
he should be dead, and requesting him to take charge of his family. In the 
letter was a death*s head marked out, and it was sealed with black. It was 
fonnd on Monday by his wife, and gave her the greatest alarm and uneasiness. 
This her husband perceiving, and learning the cause, he attempted to console 
her by assurances that he had no Intention of committing suicide, but that he 
had a presentiment of his approaching death. Capt. Purrinton was a warm be- 
liever in the doctrine of universal salvation, though it is not said of him, that 
he was a bigoted maniac or a religious enthusiast. His whole conduct the day 
preceding and during the last and bloody scene of his life, seems marked with 
the Qtmost coolness and deliberation. Towards the close of that day he ground 
the fatal axe, and when the family retired to bed, he was left reading the bible. 
The jury of inquest have brought him In guilty of wllftil murder on his wife 
and six children, and that as a felon he did kill and murder himself. We do 
not recollect that the annals of Massachusetts can furnish a transaction so 
distressing. 

The ways of Providence are dark a)id mysterious! yet Ood is just! and man^ 
weak man, must tremble and adore ! 

After the Coroner's Inquest had executed its office, the selectmen took charge 
of the dead. Their remains In eight coffins were conveyed to the meeting- 
house. 

Mrs Purrinton and her children were placed in the body of the meeting-house ; 
arranged in a row, the mother at the head and the smallest child at the foot, 
Capt. Purrinton in the porch. 

Their fUneral took place yesterday afternoon, attended by an immense con- 
course of people. 

The public services at the Meeting-house were solemn and pertinent — 
commenced by a Funeral Anthem. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Stone.* Sermon by 
Rev. Mr. Taylor." A Prayer by Rev. Mr. Merrltt.^ 

The bodies of Mrs. Purrinton and her children were Interred in the common 



6 Rev. Daniel Stone, the pastor (1795- 
1809) of the South Parish Church. 

* Rev. Joshua Taylor was bom in Prince- 
ton, N. J., February 5, 1768. In 1797, 
when the Methodists oonstitated Maine a 
district with three drcaits for denomina- 
tional work, Mr. Taylor was appointed the 
presiding elder, and also preacher in charge 
of the Readfield district ; he was engaged 
in itinerant work and chanced to he in 
AngoBta or in its neighborhood at the time 
of the tragedy ; he was a brave, strong and 
faithful evangelist, and although at that 
time the invading Methodists with their 
gospel of a full salvation through the atone- 
ment, were cordially (if not on-Christianly) 
hated by the rigid Calvanists, Mr. Taylor 
was tolerated by the latter to preach on an 
occasion bo onprecedentedly monmfnl and 



gloomy and impressive as was this one. 
Mr. Taylor sabsequently located in Cnm- 
herland County, and died in Portland, 
March 20, 1861. 

7 Rev. Timothy Merritt, horn in Bork- 
hamstead. Conn., in 1775, and died in Lynn, 
Mass., in 1845 ; he entered the Methodist 
Episcopal Ministry in 1796, and in 1797 
began his labors in Maine, working suc- 
cessively on several circuits until he located 
in Bowdoinham in 1803, wheie he remained 
until 1817. The Purrinton family having 
recently been in the field of his ministra- 
tions at Bowdoinham,was the special reason 
of his presence on this melancholy occa- 
sion ; he delivered to his congregation in 
Bowdoinham, Jnly 20, 1806, a discourse on 
the tragedy, which was printed in a pamph- 
let by Peter Edes. 



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214 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

barying ground; Capt. Parrinton in the highway acyoining the same, and the 
deadly axe and razor buried with him. 

They were attended to their graves by a nameroas and respectable procession, 
which was arranged by John Davis, Reuel Williams, and H. W. Fuller, Esqrs., 
appointed and acting as Marshals on the occasion. 

The procession moved over the bridge and through the principal streets, 
to the place of interment, in the order following. 

Senior Marshal. The Coroner, and Inquest. Eev. Mr. Haskell.** Rev. Mr. 
Stone. The Corpse of Mrs. Purrinton, and her six children, according to 
their ages, supported by bearers attended by pall-holders, followed by the 
surviving son. Other relations. Selectmen. Clergy. Sheriff of the County. 
Judges of Courts. Military Officers. Magistrates. Citizens. Marshals. 

A cart bearing the body of Capt. Purrinton, closed the procession. 

The Church service was performed at the grave over the bodies of Mrs. 
Purrinton and children by the Rev. Mr. Haskell, in a very solemn and impressive 
manner. The procession then retuimed to the meeting-house, where the 
solemnities of the day were closed by another and an appropriate prayer by 
the Rev. Mr. Gillet.* 

8 Rev. Samuel Haskell, Rector of St. « Rev. Eliphaiet OUlet, was the pastor of 

Ann's Church (name changed in 1819, to the Old Soath Parish Church, Halloweil 

Christ Church) in Gardiner, from 1803 (1794-1848). 
until 1809, when be removed to New York. 



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CHAPTER X. 
MUSTER AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 



The annual muster and inRpection and review was a popular 
feature of the early military system of the Commonwealth, and 
was continued in Maine after the Separation (1820) until re- 
pealed under Governor Anderson in 1844. With the passing of 
the old militia system whose beginning was with the Indian 
wars and which in the order of providence finally developed the 
victorious continental ami}', — went the yearly time-honored 
festival. No other event in the cycle of the seasons was so gen- 
erally the favorite of the people ; they came from near and from 
far to attend it. The courts suspended that dignified judges 
and their jurors, and the lawyers and their clients, might wit- 
ness the pageantry and participate in the diversions of the day ; 
clerical gentlemen conspicuous in black broadcloth and white 
chokers with their grave deacons and the male members of their 
flocks were there ; the countiy 'Squire wended his way thither 



Additional taxpayera, 1^44, 



Asa 


Ames, 


John 


Billings, 


Stephen 


George 


Agry, 


Charles A. 


Bird, 


Lewis 


Rafas H. 


Abbot, 


Ebenezer 


Blake, 


Jndah A. 


Ephraim J. 
Martin 


Allen, 


Josiah B. 


Blackman, 


Wm. H. 


Arris, 


Eunice 


Blackman, 


Samuel T. 


James 0. 


Adams, 


R.T. 


Bosworth, 


Wm. O. 


Nathaniel 


Acton, 


J.I. 


Bosworth, 


Daniel 


Harrison 


Annable, 


Chas. 


Bowker, 


John H. 


Colbom, 


Anthony & 


Esther 


Bodwell, 


Benj. C. 
Andrew L. 


Joseph 


Allen, 


Elbridge 


Burbrick, 


Theodore C 


. Allen, 


David 


Bronson, 


Benj. F. 


Lather 


Austin. 


Rice, 


Bradbury & 


Anna 


Freeman W.Albee. 


Horace 


Bridge, 


Wm. C. 


Geo. M. 


Bra^g, 


Jacob 


Britt, jr., 


James 


Jepheth 


Bra«g, 


Asa 


Bums, 


George F. 


Freeman 


Barker, 


Daniel 


Bennett, 


Thomas 


Ephraim 


Ballard, 3d, 


Samuel 


Beal, 


Albion 


SaUy 


Ballard, 


Columbus 


Bunnell, 


Frank 


Samuel K. 


Bailey, 


Abigail 


Caldwell, 


Alfred 


Erastns 


Bessey. 


Joseph H. 


Clapp. 


John 



Chase, 

Cfaurlong, 

Chadwick, 

Chapman, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Cony, 2d, 

Church, 

Church, 

Chase, 

Caldwell & Co. 

Child, 

Clough, 

ClasBon, 

Cook, 

Connor, 

Coombs, 

Cross, 

Colbum, 

Cross. 



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216 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



on horseback, the village doctor in his high-wheeled gig; and 
the local aristocrat beneath the canopy of the more luxurious 
one-horse-shay. The fanners and mechanics and youth of the 
surrounding country, wearing their best suits of homespun, 
started from their homes at daybreak in clumsy wagons and 
lumbering carts or afoot, to be early at the appointed rendez- 
vous for the excitements of the great holiday. Like the Olym- 
piads which measured the time of ancient Greece, the general 
muster made the calendar for the locality where it was held ; 
"before muster," and " after muster," constituted the two grand 
diviijions of the year as well to the populace as to the militia — 
which latter experienced the culmination of its annual bloodless 



Hassey, 

Huntington, 

Hutchinson, 

Hodges, 

Hallowell, 

Johnson, 

Johnson, 

Johnson, 2d, 

Johnson, 

Judd, 

Jenkins, 

Knowles, 

Knowies, 

Keisa, 

Kennedy, 

Kimball, 

Kennedy, 

Kidder, 

Keye*, 

Kempton, 

Kempton, 

KimbaU, 

KimbaU, 

Lambard, 

Littlefield, 

Lincoln, 

Littlefield, 

Leighton, 

Leighton, 

Leighton, 

Lord, 

Lunt& 

Laughton, 

Lainson, 

Mitchell, 

Merrill, 

Marr, 

Mahoney, 

Manley, 

Manley, 

Marriner, 

Maul, 

Marshal. 



AddUional 


taxpayers, 1844,— continued. 




Charles 


Currier, 


Albert 


Folsom, 


Smith 


Sarah B. 


CroweU, 


Samuel C. 


Gage, 


Urial 


John 


Dorr, 


William 


Gage, 


Chandler 


James S. 


Davis, 


William 


Garrison, 


Ephraim 


Josiah 


Dana, 


Joel 


Gardiner, jr.. 


Edmond 


Dana, jr., 


Paul 


Getchell, 


Si^ 


Henry 


Duren, 


Gidding, 


Samuel 


George 


DearDom, 


Joseph 
Stephen 


GiUey, 


Samuel 


Asa 


Gilley, 


Israel G. 


Joshua 


Dearborn, 


Daniel S. 


Goldthwait, 


Sylvester 


George W. 


Delano, 
Dillingham & 


Chandler 


Goldthwait, 


Libbeus 


Bicknell, 


Elizabeth 


Goldthwait, 


Henry H. 


Zebidee F. 


Daley, 


Davis 


Golder, 


John 


John 


Davidson, 


Leonard 


Goss, 


Gove 


John 


Dunn, 


Beubdu 


Greenlief, 


Nathaniel 


Beni. H. 
Ben]. G. 


Davenport, 
Eveleth, 


Samuel 


Guild. 
Gould, 


Samuel 


John M. 


John 


LucadaS. 


Edwards, 


Henry 


Green, 


S. W. 


John 


Estes, 


Samuel 


Griffin, 


Stephen S. 


Jere D. 


Estes, 


William 


Harris, 


Joseph 


Olive 


Ellis, 


Albert B. 


Hall, 


Jonathan 


Fifield 


Estes, 


»p"* 


Hall, 


X^harles 


Solomon 


Estes, 


Hall, 


Apphia 


Francis M. 


Folger, 


Nathaniel 


HaU, 


Sarah F. 


Ziba 


Fletcher, 


Hollis, 


Hadley & 


Lewis 


Marlboro P. Faught, 


Mary 


Hartford, 


A. B. 


Samuel 


Famham, 


John H. 


Hartford, 


Asa 


Elbridge C 


. Fassett, 


JaneH. 


Hartwell, 


Charles 


Charles 


Freeman, 


Erastus 


Haskell, 


Edward 


Charles 


Field, 


Jacob 


Hanks, 


George 


George 


Fisher, 


Jacob 


Hanks, jr., 


Mark 


George 


Finn, 


Edson 


Hanks, 


Kilbum, 


John 


Fly, 


Ziba 


Hanks, 


Leander B. 


Frances 


Fly, 


Amasa 


Hewins, 


Joseph S. 


Orrin 


Fly, 


Benjamin 


Hilton, 


Nath'l C. 


William 


Foster, 


Isaac W. 


Hilton, 


Enoch 


Henry A. 


Foster, 


Jesse 


Holden, 


H. S. P. 


Willis N. 


Foster, 


William 


Hodgkins, 


Florence 


Lra 


Foster, 


George B. 


Hoyt, 


EliF. 


Esther G. 


Fuller, 


Charles 


Heard, 


James S. 


Caleb 


FuUer, 


Valentine 


Holt, 


David N. 


Eveleth, 


Fairbanks & 


John 


Holmes, 


John 


David 


Folsom. 


Wm. 


Hume. 


Levi 



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MUSTER AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 



217 



campaign in the exercise of passing in review before the high- 
est available dignitary of the State. 

The organization of the militia consisted of companies of 
infantry in citizen's dress (better known as " string- beaners") , 
light infantry in uniform, cavalry, artillery, and riflemen ; these 
were organized into regiments, brigades, and divisions. The 
company enrolments of eligible, able-bodied citizens between 
the ages of twenty-one and forty years, were made at the May 
trainings, followed by panides for drill and discipline several 
times during the vernal season. It was autumn when they as- 
sembled in regiments, brigades and divisions, for the general 
muster. The fife and drum for the infantry and riflemen, and 
the bugle for the cavalry and artillery attuned to martial airs 
made music quite as thrilling and spirit-stirring as the modern 
brass bands. The division, brigade and regimental oflSeers 
wearing the Bonapartean wind-cutting chapeaus surmounted by 
lofty plumes, and on their shoulders glittering epaulettes, were 
proudly mounted on prancing and gaudily caparisoned horses. 
The light infantrymen wore coats of blue ; the artillery-men's 

Additional tctxpayera, 1844, — oontinned. 
C. D. Manuel, 

WUUam H. Mason, 



John H. 

John 

Enoch C. 

Isaac 

Stately 

Franklin 

David 

John G. 

Zebulon 

Geo. H. 

Richard 

Hartford 

Asahal H. 

Caleb 

Seth 

James 

James B. 

E.G. 

Lorenzo D. 

John 

Henry 



Marshall, 

Means & Son, 

Moody & CJo., 

McFailand, 

McFarland, 

Merrow, 

MUler, 

MitcheU, 

Morse, 

Murray, 

Moody, 

Merrow, 

Merchant, 

Nash, 

Nntting, 

Nason, 

Norris, 

Norris, 

Newoomb, 

Newell, 

Norcross, 



William G. Norcross, 
Adnah L. Norcross, 



Simeon 
John A. 
William 
Anson 



Orff, 
Perkins, 
Perkins, 
Paul, 



YalantineS. Palmer, 
Lewis Packard, 

Orrin Parker. 



John 


Perly, 


George L. 


Paul 


Pease 


Henry 


Mansfield 


PettingiU, 


Thomas 


Th:)mas 


Peasly, 


Evander 


Alden W. 


Philbrick, 


John G. 


Calvin 


Philips, 


Wm. B. H. 


John 


Philbrick, 


Wm. C. H. 


William 


Philbrick, 


Sarah S. 


Nathaniel 


Philbrick, 


Philip W. 


Albert 


Pinkham, 


Joshua 


Andrew J. 


Pitts, 


Joseph 


James C. 


Pitts, 


John 


Darins 


Place, 


Elbndge 


Lyman A. 


Pond, 


Thomas 


Poole, 


Charles 


Barrett E. 


Potter, 


Nathaniel 


Daniel F. 


Potter, 


James 


George F. 


Potter, 


James 


Gideon 


Powers. 


Ward 


Jonathan B. Pinkhain. 


Estate of W 


Greenwood 


Prescott, 


Daniel 


Levicns 


Rawkins, 


John M. 


Isaac H. 


Randall, 
Ramsdell, 


Benjamin 


David 


John 


Isaac 


Ray, 


Abisha 


Samuel 


Randall, 


Isaac 


Luther W. 


Reed, 


Isaiah M. 


John N. 


Richards, 


Mrs. Sarah 


William T. 


Richards, 


Benjamin 


Mrs. 


Robinson, 


Elias B. 


George M. 


Robinson, 


John 


Jeremiah 


Robinson. 


George L. 



Robinson, 
Robinson, 
Robinson, 
Bobbins, 
Robbins, 
Robbins, 
Robbins, 
Rockwood, 
Ross, 
Robbins, 
Roberts, 
Roby, 
Robinson & 
Scribner, 
Savage, jr., 
Sabins, 
Safford, 
Saunders, 
Savage, 
. Saunders, 
Savage, jr., 
Savage, 
Savage, 
Sawyer, 
Soule, 
Shurtleff, 
Sherman, 
Sherman, 
Shaw, 
Shaw, 

Shaw, jr., 2d, 
Sleeper. 



Digitized by 



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218 HISTOBT OF AUOUSTA. 

were of the revolutionary color faced with red, and the rifle- 
men were attired in suits of green, — which color was supposed 
to permit the wearers to lie in ambush amongst the verdant 
foliage unobserved by the enemy. To each regiment of infantry 
was usually attached a company of artillery and another of cav* 
airy. \^'hen the several bodies were brought upon the field and 
formed in column with flags and cannon and sabres and muskets, 
the exhibition was very imposing and exciting to the assembled 
beholders. 

The local champ de Mars or muster-ground of the Eighth 
Division was situated l>etween the villages of Augusta and 
Hallowell in a field or common that formed a part of what was for 
many years called Hinkley's Plains.^ Its southerly border 
began at a point two or three rods northerly from the present 
Hallowell soldiers* monument, and extended to the river. 
Between the muster-ground and the present Amos Wilder field, 
stood the dwelling-house of Xorcross, and a few rods easterly 
of that was a barn-like structure built and used for public the- 
atrical shows. The muster-ground lay east of the highway and 
extended northerly until interrupted by bad land and bushes 
near the Augusta line ; its easterly limit was the river. The 
cut for the railroad had not then been dreamed of. 

At its south-cast corner it adjoined the town burying-ground, 
which then extended half way from the river to the highway. 
The ten'itory west of the highway opposite was slightly im- 
proved pasture land and with the muster-field belonged to the 
esUite of Thomas L. Winthrop of Boston. A considei-able por- 
tion of the spot devoted to the parade and evolutions of the 
troops and the principal features of the muster, has gradually 
been covered by the graves of the passing generations of the 
people of Hallowell. 

On the slightly elevated terrace some sixty rods northerly 

1 Thomas (1736-1821 ) , Shnbael, Jimior, former came previons to 1772 ; Shabaol, Jr., 

James and Aaron Hinkley— natives of and James were taxed in 1773, and Aaron 

Brunswick, and sons of Shnbael Hinkley, was here in 1782. Some of these brothers 

Senior (1707 1798), — were early settlers. and sons and other descendants lived near 

Thomas and Shnbael, Junior, twins, were the sontherly end of the tract which took 

bom Dec. 7, 1736, 0. S., Dec. 18, N. S., the from them the name of Hinkley's Plains. 



Digitized by 



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MUSTEB AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 



219 



from where now stands the memorial to Governor Bodwell, the 
general and regimental officers established their headquaiters in 
a large field tent, — or marquee. The troops being quartered 
elsewhere than on the field — in taverns and barns and sail- 
lotlts— during the night, reported for duty on the field at a 
seasonable hour in the morning. The boundary of the martial 
field was officially fixed and a line of pacing sentinels duly 
posted to keep it intact. 

Outside of the guard-line and often restlessly surging across 
it was the great concourse of spectators dmwn hither from all 
the country round. It was an heterogenous multitude, intent 
on extracting from the occasion all of the entertainment there 
was in it. On the outskirts and by the i^oad^ides were carts, 
and booths and counters galore, for the sale of gingerbread, 
and cakes and sweetmeats, and of the delectable antidotes for 
the constant thirst of topers of common degree, called gin- 
sling, and black-strap and grog. It was looked upon as appro- 
priate for everybody to he good-natured and merry and as not 
in bad form for a few exhilarated Tam O'Shanters to feel — 

♦ ♦ ♦ •*Gloriou8, 
O'er aU the iUs of life vlctorioas I" 

The days of fervid temperance oratory and prohibitory laws 

Additional taxpayerBt 1844^ — concluded. 



Isaac 


Sherman, 


Joel 


Taylor, 


Joab 


Wilson, 


Harrison O 


. Smith, 


Thomas 


Towle, 


J. S. 


Whitney, 


William H 


Smith, 


Wm. G. 


Tibbetts, 


Albert 


Whitney, 


Orrin 


Smith, 


Thomas 


Tibbetts, 


James M. 


WUliams, 


Horatio 


Smith, 


John T. 


Tobey, 


Greenlief A. Wilber, Dr., 


George M. 


Smith, 


George 


Thing, 


Franklin 


Wingate, 


Reuben C. 


Smith, 


Samuel 


Titcomb, jr.. 


Jesse 


Wilson, 


Issachar 


Snell, jr.. 


Chandler 


Tuttle, 


Franklin 


Wilson, 


Sarah 


Snell, 


Joshua S. 


Turner, 


Lombard, 


Wills & 


Mary 


Southwick, 


Thomas 


Tibbetts, 2d, 


Thomas 


Winter, 


Thomas 


Southard, 


Amaziah 


Tinkham, 


Josiah 


Whlttier, 


James 


Springer, 


Samuel 


Trask,2d, 


Newell 


Woodward, 


Thos. A. 


Springer. 
Sparhawk, 


Zeotlus 


Trask 


Wm. H. 


Woods, 


Ambrose 


Hiram 


Trask, 


Asaph 


Works, 


Leonard 


Stanley, 


Lyman 


Trask, 


Samuel J. 


Winter, 


Page, 


Staples & 


Wharf As* 


[i,Vo8e, 


Ezekiel 


Ware, 


Stephen 


Scruton. 


William 


Wing, 


John 


Yeaton, 


M. Hanson Scrnton, 


Otis 


Whitmore, 


Samuel 


Yeaton, 


James F. 


Stevens, 


Levi 


Ward, 


Andrew 


Yeaton, 


Rebecca 


Stewart, 


Homer 


Webster, 


Joshua 


Yeaton, 


WiUiam 


Stone, 3d, 


William 


Walker, 


Philip 


Yeaton, 


George W. 


Snow, 


Samuel 


Ward, 


Laommi B 


. Yeaton, 


Thomas 


Stickney, 


George 


Wentworth, 


Theodore 


Yeaton, 


Benj. A. 


Swan, 


James P. 


Weeks, 


Ezekiel 


York, 


Otis 


Swain, 


Chas. 


W'eston, 


Franklin 


Young, 


Abraham 


Stickney. 


Samuel T. 


Weston, 


Allen 


Young. 


Ambrose F. Small, 


Harrison 


White, 






John G. N. 


Taylor. 


Albert 


Whitten. 







Digitized by 



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220 



HISTORT OF AC6USTA. 



and enforcement leagues were then in the fhtnre ; the Deacon 
Gile8' dbtilleries were running on fall time and an occasional 
Sunday, and no such obstacle as adven^e public sentiment 
intervened to discourage the vice — almost universal — of 
tippling. Ministers and brethren of the churches embodying the 
standard of social respectability, moistened their fine clay with 
tonics and cordials, like the vulgar incorrigibles. 

The forces rendezvoused in the village a half-mile away, and 
there made their formation for approaching the field. The Hal- 
lo well Artillery « with two brass 6-pounders and tumbril, and 
sixty rank and file, took their places in line on Second street ; 
the cavalry e/i roif/6 from the Forks of the Road (now Man- 
chester), when on the top of Winthrop hill, sounding their 
bugle, sent a thrill through the waiting throngs, and they were 
eagerly watched until they took up their position on the 
extreme right of the line, southerly of the Old South Parish 



Additi<mal taxpayer$j 1847 > 



Ephnum I. 


AlUen, 


Pardon 


Samael F. 


Allen, 


Fred'k W. 


Wingate, 


Allen & 


A.D- 


ThompBon 
Joseph 


Atwood, 


Dexter W. 


Asiel. 
Aastin, 


William 


Benj. D. 


William I. 


Wm. 8. 


Badger, 


DeanB. 


James 


Bailej, 


Thomas 


Eben 


Bailey, 


Sheldren 


Daniel 


Bachelder, 


Palmer 


P.I. 


Bachelder, 


Wm.N. 


Silas 


Baker, 


Michael 


Daniel O. 


Baker, 


Charles 


Charles H. 


Barton, 


Hiram L. 


Keuben T. 


Barton, 


Samuel S. 


William H 


. Bartlett, 


George M. 


Cooper 


Bartlett, 


David 


Simon 


Bartlett, 


Famham 


James 


Bates, 


Isaac S. 


Jeremiah 


Boan, 


Henry D. 


Georcfe 


Bennett, 


EbsnezerO 


Alfred 


Bicknell, 


James 


James A. 


BickndU, 


Chas. S. 


E. F. 


Biilingi. 


Jonas 


Blanchard& Brown, 


Alexander 


Phillips 


Brown, 


Oorham 


Mlcha3l 


Brown, 


Obed 


Thaddeas 


Bean, 


John 


Charles 


Booker, . 


Asa 


Philomon 


Bolton, 


Orrison 


James N. 


Bolton, 


Ralph 


Joshaa 


BDwler, 


James 


Wm. I. 


Bowman, 


George 


Joshaa 


Bowman, 


Thomas 


Abial D. 


Bowman, 


J. M. 


Joihaa 


Boyington, 


Henty M. 


Wm. 


Boyington. 


Joseph 



Brownell, 
Bnuin, 
Brown, 
Brackett, 
Brackett, 
Brackett, 
Bragg, 
Brennan, 
Branch, 
Branch, 
Bragg, 
Brown, 
Britt, 
Brooks, 
Brooks, 
Brooks, 
Brid >n, 
Brick, 
Brown, 
Brown, 
. Brown, 
Backley, 
Bnckley, 
Bnmham, 
Burgess, 
Burgess, 
Bnrgess, 
Barns, 
Bams, 
Barren, 
Batler, 
Bowdoin, 
Brown, 
Braxg, 
Ballard, 
Black barn, 
Carrill. 



Mary I. 

Charles A. 

Geoige W. 

William 

Henry 

Daniel 

Engene 

Almond 

Jabez 

Samnel 

James 

Elizabeth 

MehitaUe 

Jabez 

Arthnr L. 

T. A. 

Geoige A. 

James R. 

Timothy 

Edward 

Jeremiah 

Charles 

Daniel 

Nathan H. 

Renel 

Andrew F. 

Charles L. 

WUliam 

William F. 

Robert L. 

Henry C. 

James 

Blatchford, 

George 

Springer, 

George 

AmasaL. 



Carter, 

CaldweU, 

Caldwell, 

Caldwell, jr., 

Carleton, 

Carr, 

Collins, 

Carson, 

Chnrchell, 

Chamberlain, 

Clark, 

Chandler, 

Chandler, 

Charchill, 

Chase, 

Chick, 

Child, 

Child, 

Crantz, 

Crantz, 

Crantz, 

Chorch, 

Church, 

Church, 

Chamberlain, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Clark, 

Clough, 

Cogan, 

Cofren & 

Collins, 

Col bum & 

Cony, 2d, 

Cook. 



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MUSTEB AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 



221 



Meeting-house (the Artillery in front of the building) ; next 
came the Hallowell Light Infantry, about forty strong, with 
their blue coats, white pantaloons and waving plumes ; next the 
South Company, commonly called " Vaughan's Company," a 
solid looking body of men, eighty strong, with belts crossed 
a la revolution ; and the un-uniformed North Company or local 
string-beaners ; the Augusta Light Infantry, and the other two 
Augusta companies, and companies from Gardiner, Pittston, 
Litchfield and other places, completed the line extending north- 
erly to Winthrop street. The band, comprising a large num- 
ber of instruments, differing from those in use thi*ee-(]uarters 
of a century later, took position near the center of the line 
that its music might be heard alike on right and left. The 
column then took up the line of march to the muster-field. Ar- 
rived there the officers were sumptuously entertained at the 
marquee by Colonel Vaughan. 

The musicians took up their quarters at the marquee and in- 
dustriously discoursed their best melodies during the afternoon ; 
toward night, however, it was usually observed that either from 



Additional taxpayen, 1847,—' oontinned. 



Calvin Crowell. 

James Cox, 

George Coleman, 
Elbridge G. Coy, 
Albert Cottle, 

Thomas Cook, 
D. F. Corson, 

Geoi^ 0. Crawford, 
Henry L. Cashing, 
Wheelock Craig, 
Franklin H. Chadwick, 
Cyras Daniels, 

J. & £. Davis & Co., 
Nathan Davis, 
Franklin Davis, 
Peter Dealy, 

Thomas B. Deane, 
Franklin De Long, 



Sewall, 
Joseph 
Thomas 
Titcomb, 
Wm. A. P. 
John 
G. A. 
Thomas 
Robert P. 
William 
Sarah 
John S. 
Thomas I. 



Deering & 

Denni8ton,Jr., 

Dorkendori, 

Dillingham & 

Dillingham, 

Dole, 

Dodge, 

Doud, 

Donnell, 

Downs, 

Dnmmer, 

Dndley, 

Dudley. 



James Dudley, 

George W. Dudley, 

George W. Duran, 

George 

Widow E. 

Wm. S. 

Henry 

Daniel 

Amasal. 

Joseph H. 

Joseph W. 

Alonzo 

Reynolds, 

Cyras 

Samuel G. 

Henry D. 

Benj. R. 

David 

Joseph H. 

Francis M. 

Hazen L. 

Wm. F. 

Uriah 

Danforth 

Greenlief 

Wm. F. Fovi 

Lucretia G. Fuller, 

Fred'k A. Fuller, 

John J. Fuller, 

Warren Fuller, 

John Fulton. 



DuttOD, 

Dalton, 

Dorian, 

Eaton, 

Elder, 

Ellis, 

Ellis, 

Ellis, 

Ellis, 

Farrington & 

Fellows, 

Fisher, 

Fisk, 

Fletcher, 

Fletcher, 

Folsom, 

Folansbee, 

Foster, 

Foster, 

Foster, 

Foster, 



Thaddeus Feraald, 

Berry, Garrison & 

Hilton, Garfield & 

Peter Gay, jr., 

Alexander Gardiner, 



Alonzo 

Beni. G. 

Andrew 

Moses 

Josiah 

Albert 

Nathaniel 

Gideon 

Edward C. 

Alfred 

Joseph 

Gilbert 

Chapman, 

Thomas H 

Lewis 

Chas. S. 

Hugh 

Henry M. 

Moses H. 

Wm. 

Turner, 

Alexander 

George S. 

William G. Hali; 

W^illiam A. Hawes, 

Abigail W. Hale. 



Gaubert, 

Gale, 

Getchell, 

Getchell, 

Getchell, 

GiUey, 

Oilman, 

Goldthwait, 

Gove, 

Golder, 

Goss, 

GrevA 

Glidden, 

Griffin, 

Greenlief, 

Galagan, 

Harlow, 

Harlow, 

Halpen, 

Hall& 

Hall, 

Hall, 



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222 



HI8TOBY OF AUGUSTA. 



the fatigues of the day or the ovorflow of spirits their music 
dwindled into indistinctness. 

William Oliver Vaughan, born November 5, 1783, was a son of Dr. Ben- 
jamin Vaoghan and came with his parents to the Hallo well-Hook settlement 
when fourteen years old; he became an enterprising basiness man, versatile, 
generous and very public-spirited. In the fall of 1814, when the troops were 
called upon to go to Wiscasset to oppose the threatened landing of British 
soldiers ft*om the seventy-four gunshlp La Hogup., then lying off the coast, 
Colonel Vaughan was captain of the Hallowell South Company ; William Em- 
mons, then of Augusta, was his lieutenant. This company was regarded as 
one of the best in the Commonwealth. It was enough in those days if each 
uniformed militiaman appeared on parade with gun, knapsack, cartridge-box 
and bayonet, without regard to uniformity, but such was the military pride 
Instilled into the ranks of this company by its captain, they appeared almost 
like a uniformed body of men. This company's ranks were always full, every 
man had his scrupulously white belts crossed in revolutionary style, impart- 
Ing to the company an appearance easily distinguishable from other companies 
on parade. On muster-days the men were not left to shirk for themselves in 



Lock, 

Lord, 

Longfellow, 

Longfellow, 

Longfellow, 

Longfellow, 

Lovering, 

Lyon, 

Merrill, 

Mahony, 
'. Maxim, 

Manley, 

Manley, 

Manning, 

Manson, 

Mason, 2d, 

Marston, 

McGregor, 
, Morton, 

McOlothlen, 

McKenney, 

MerriU, 

Miller, 

Miller, 

Moody, 

Moore, 

Moore, 

Morse, 
. Morae, 

Morse, 

Murry, 

Nash, 

Nay, 

Newell, 

Nason, 

Nichols, 
, Nichols, 

North, 

Noyes, 

Nichless. 



Additional 


Uuepayersj 1847,— continued. 




Colbom, 


HaUett& 


Joseph W. 


Jones, 


Daniel P. 


Moses C. 


Hatch, 
Hamlin, 


William H 


. Joy, 


Charles I. 


James £. 


Jeremiah 


Joy, 


Martin 


Chas. £. 


Hamlin, 


Jonathan 


Knowles, 


Albert G. 


Sprout 


Hapgood, 


Augustus 


Knowles, 


Simeon 


Lemuel 


Hatch, 


Canals Co. 


Ken. Lockf & 


Greenleaf 


Wm. 


Hamden, 


Company, 
William 


Kennebec, 


Miss Ann 


John 


Harvey, 


Keaton, 


Charles A. 


Jonathan 


Hawes, 


Patrick 


Keegan, 


Aaron B. 


Mathew 


Hayden, 


Curtis 


Kempton, 


John 


William 


HaskeU, 


Edmund 


Kelsey, 
Kennedy, 


Timothy 


iTaT. 


Hartwell & 


George 


Converse F. 


Hedge, 


Samnel 


Kendall, 


Amasa 


Hamlen, 


Hedge & 


LeviN. 


Kendall, 


John 


James 


Hewins, 


Noah B. 


Kent, 


George 


Charles A. 


Hewins, 


Joseph A. 


Kilbreth, 


James C. 


Edward 


Hebblewhite, 


James 


Kilbreth, 


Joel 


Michael 


Houd, 


William J. 


Kilbreth, 


Benjamin 
William 


Charles E. 


Hilton, 


Charles 


Kincaid, 


Betsey 


Horn, 
Hodgkins, 


Hiram 


Kiucaid, 


William D. 


Mathew 


John 


Kimball, 


William 


Joseph 
Manley, 


Homer, 


William 


Kimball, 


Reuben 


Homan & 


Barbonr 


Lane, 


Samuel 


Mary M. 


Homan, 


Nathaniel 


Lamson, 


William B. 


KandaU 


Hopkins, 
Hodges, 


Geo. W. 


Lancaster, 


Bainbridge 


Benjamin 


James 


Lane, 


Bailey 


David L. 


Hurd, 


Samuel 


Laughton, 


Thomas 


Wilmot I. 


Hussey, 


Mary 


Lavery, 


John 


Lovi 


Huntington, 


Patrick 


Lacy, 


Dennis 


Ebon 


Husney, 


Albert 


Leavitt, jr., 


William H. 


William 


Hanniford, 


Orrin 


Lee man. 


Charles W. 


Michael 


Hnlm, 


Henry 


Leighton, 


Winthrop 


Hermon 


Hathom, 


Thomas 


Leighton, 


John M. 


Isaac 


Holmes, 


Mrs. J. S. 


Lemont, 


Joseph 0. 


John 


Hoxie, 


Moses D. 


Lynn, 


Milton 


John H. 


Hoxie, 


Bradbury 


Libby & Co., 


Thomas 


Chas. W. 


HaskeU, 


Asa 


Libbv, 


Henry L. 


Albion 


lUsley, 


William K 


. Libby, 


William A. 


Edward S. 


Ingraham, 


Angastus 


Libby, 


Mrs. M. 


Samnel 


JeweU, 


Oliver 


Libby, 


Ephraim 


Horace 


Jones. 


Mi6sL.E. 


Lock. 


George 



Digitized by 



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MUSTER AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 



223 



obtaining their dinner, but a long table, well set out with nice corned beef and 
pork with all needed vegetables, cooked on the spot, was set in a shady place, 
and all dined together at the expense of their Captain. This generosity con- 
tinued after he was called to the command of the regiment. lu the capacity 
of colonel his military arder was devoted to the regiment as it had been to his 
company. He infused new life into its ranks, provided a good band of music 
for its use, and an elegant marquee for the entertainment of the officers. 
After several years' service his health failed, and he was obliged to relinquish 
his command, but his interest in the regiment continued until his death. When 
he had become so feeble as to be only able to ride out on pleasant days, on 
the occasion of a regimental muster, he was seen to ride slowly the whole 
length of the line on Second street in Hallo well as if to take a last look upon 
them. The sadness of his countenance betokened the deep feeling he had at 
the thought that he might be looking upon the line for the last time. He died 
August 15, 1826, and was buried in the family cemetery on the Vaughan home- 
stead, where his dust lies beside that of his wife and six children. 



AdtUtiontU taxpayerSf 1847, — continued. 



Wooden 


Norris, 


Phiney 


Randall. 1 


WUliam A. 


John 


NoweU, 


Shephard P. Randall', | 


John S. 


Isaiah 


Noyes, 


Rnssell H. 


Reed, 


Jeremiah T. 


WiUiam H 


. Norcross, 


James W. 


Remick 


Ruth 


John H. 


Norcross, 


Daniel 


Remick, 


Samnel 


Thomas 


Norcross, 
Pettengill, 


John 


Remick, 


Joseph 


M. H. 


John M. 


RiC3, 


Edward B. 


John H. 


Packard, 


John A. 


Richards, 


George 


Daniel 


Palmer, 


James 


Richardson, 


George D. 


Tattie, 


Parker & 


Wm. 


Richardson, 


Nathan D. 


Willard R. 


Page, 


Thomas 


Rines, jr., 


George W. 


Lather 


Pi^, 


Daniel 


King, 


James 


Joseph F. 


Page, 


S9th 


Richardson, 


William 


George N. 


Page, 


Elbridge 


Roberts, 


Hiram B. 


Amos C. 


Partridge. 


D.S. 


Richards, 


Ai 


Joseph 


Partridge, 


Asa 


Robbins, 


George 


Stephen 


Parker, 


Henry 


Robbins, 


Jesse 


Jefferson 


Parsons, 


Elizabeth 


Rog<jrs, 


Alphonzo 


Chnrch, 


Plaisted & 


J. W. 


Rogers, 


Charles W. 


Stephen 


Perkins, 


Chas. A. 


Ross, 


Charles 


Chas. 


Pease, 


Ezra 


Robinson, 


Moses M. 


Theodore B.Perkins. 


Timothy S 


. Robinson, 


Alanson 


Geo. W. 


Perry, 


Darius 


Rockwood, 


Nathaniel 


Philander S.Percival. 


Wm. G. 


Son per. 


Eben B. 


Lewis 


Pickett, 


Charles 


Saunders, 


Samuel 


Prentice P 


. Pierce, 


Joel 


Savage, 


Harrison 


Peter 


Pierce, 


Lemael B. 


Sawyer, 


Frederic H. 


Wm. 0. 


Pilsbnry, 


J. W. 


Sawyer, 


Stephen 


Horatio 


Plnkham, 


Henrv E. 


Sawyer, 


Andrew S. 


Sarah 


Pinkham, 


John G. 


Sawyer, 


Albert 


Jaoie] S. 


Plummer, 


John 


Scoles, 


Horace 


Ja'nei 


Plummer, 


Widow H 


[. Sewall, 


Francis 


Abner 


Plammer, 


Joseph D. 


Severance, 


John 


John 


Plummer, 


Frank 


Shaw, 


Francis B. 


Freeman 


Pratt, 


Hiram 


Shorey, 


N.C. 


John A. 


Pond, 


Henry A. 


Shorey, 


Bailey 


John M. 


Pond, 


John 


Smiley, 


Wm. M. 


Charles 


Prince, 


Orsamus 


Smiley, 


Klah 


Frank in 


Prescott, 


William B 


. Sibley, 


Spencer 


Ci'rjnus 


Pnllen, 


Richard 


Smart, 


John 


Gilbert 


Pullen, 


Norris 


Small. 


Dammer 


Jossph A. 


Perkins. 


Mrs. Nancy Smith. 


Daniel 



Smith, 
Smith, 
. Sibley, 
Sparhawk, 
Spollett, 
Springer, 
Springer, 
Starrott, 
Stanley, 
Stanwood, 
Stevens, 
Stevens, 
Stevens, 
Stevens, 
Staples, 
Stevens, 
Stinson, 
Stone, 
Stone, 

Stilkey, 

Swan, 

Starks, 

Small, 

Shorey, 

Tar box, 

Taylor, 
. Tibbetts, 

Temple, 

Tibbetts, 

Thomas, 

Thaver, 

Towle, 

Thomson, 

Tobey, 

Tozier, 

Trask, 

Towle, 

Trask, 

Trask, 

Trask, 

Trask, 

Thompson. 



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224 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

After the parade had been formed waiters bearing water-pails 
full of regulation grog were de{)loyed along the line to offer to 
each man in the ranks the liquid means of acquiring fully the 
spirit of the day.^ After the administration of the ration of grog 
there followed the other performances for which the troops had 
been assembled. There was exhibition of marching and facing, 
and of the various evolutions prescribed by the school of tactics 
of that era, the last exercise or grand finale consisting of the re- 
view when the whole command of horse and foot — artillery, 
cavalry, riflemen, infantry and string-beaners — passed at quick- 
step in serried column before the imposing gaze of the general 
commanding ; who, stationed astride of a well-groomed horse in 
the majesty of a Csesar or Napoleon, graciously acknowledged 
by a motion of his dexter hand, the salutations'of the officers of 
the marching forces. After the column had passed, the reviewing 
officer, ordered the troops dismissed, and proceeded to the big 
marquee for the congratulatory ceremonies of the hour — which 
were frequently if not usually in the form of social libations 
with his high subordinate officers. The mimic army suddenly 
resolved itself into its component organizations, and filed off the 
field by regiment or company, which in the process of dispei'sion 
rapidly disintegrated into individuals, wearily and footsore, 
wending their way in all directions toward their respective 
homes. 

The general muster in the autumn of 1817 had features which 
made it especially memorable to all who attended — to the militia 
and citizens alike. It was distinguished by the presence of the 
accomplished commander-in-chief. Governor Brooka.^ Before 

s It was the gross intemperance practices general of militia and filled that position 

at the annnal masters that impelled the with great aptness and grace. In 1816 he 

legislature to abolish them. (Chap. 122, laws was elected gpvemor of Massachusetts and 

of 1S41.) was annually re-electsd until 1823, when he 

8 John Brooks was born at Medford, declined to b3 again a candidate. Being 

Mass., May 3, 1752, and died March 1, the chief magistrat3 at the time ofthesep- 

1825. He was a physician by profession aration of Maine from the mother State, it 

and settled in practice at Reading. When was he who issued the proclamation oon- 

the war of the revolution broke out in the summating that event on the 24th day of 

fight at Lexington he immediately entered August, 1819. John Brooks was the second 

the continental service, and received in Commonwealth governor who visited the 

1777 the rank of lieutenant-colonel. After Kennebec,— the first one being Christopher 

the war for many years he was major- Gore in 1809. 



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MU8TEB AT HINKLEY'S PLAINS. 225 

the separation, a personage of so high rank as governor was rarely 
seen in the District of Maine — a corner of the Commonwealth 
which was looked upon at the capital a little condescendingly as 
a backwoods appanage useful mainly for the surplus sons and 
daughters of swarming families in the Old Bay State. Christopher 
Gore while governor in 1809 made a journey into Maine in his 
private carriage, with his wife, and incidentally reviewed the 
divisions of the militia at Brunswick* and Hallowell ; Governor 
Gore was not versed in the art military and had no penchant for 
the noise and pomp and blare of which in times of peace it so 
lai*gel3' consists ; his advent upcm the martial field in civic dress, 
with padded coach, and footman, was not inspiring to the 
occasion, and in a military sense his visit was a failure. 

To excite public interest and overcome the depression 
occasioned by the visit of Governor Gore, the generals and 
brigadiers and lesser chieftains prevailed upon Governor Brooks 
to come to the District of Maine and appear at the principal 
parades in the autumn of 1817. That lofty official was in person 
and spirit the ideal military commander; he was the pride of 
Boston and the ornament of its grandest public occasions. No 
warrior ever posed more proudly and becomingly on his gilded 
charger than did he, and his presence as the august Governor of 
the Commonwealth on Hinkley's Plains at Hallowell, was an 
extraordinary local event. 

At that time Henry Sewall of Augusta, was the Major-general 
of the Eighth Division consisting of the militia of the counties of 
Kennebec and Somerset as then existing ; William Gould of 
Farmington was the brigade-general ; and William O. Vaughan 
of Hallowell, was the colonel of the regiment; Jesse Robinson 
of Hallowell was major of cavalry; Jonathan Judkins of Mon- 
mouth, was major of artillery ; Cromwell Aldrich^ was captain 

4 Me. Hist. Soc.Ck)ll. 2d series, 5:71. pline of his oommand. Having retired 

6 Cromwell Aldrich went to Hallowell to from business a few years before his death, 

live abont 1816, and opened a dry goods he was in the habit of spending winters in 

store in the large doable tenement boilding New Orleans, and sunmiers at Hallowell, 

on the east side of Water street at the foot and on the occasion of one of his passages 

of Academy street. He took great pride he met his death at Havana, August 18, 

in the fine military appearance and disci- 1827, aged 33 years. 

15 



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226 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

of the Hallo well artillery ; Andrew Masters® was first lieutenant ; 
Samuel K. Oilman'' was second lieutenant. 

During the day preceding the muster the field was cleared of 
debris and trespassing obstructions ; the guard-lines were estab- 
lished and fixed by driven stakes ; and Colonel Vaughan's 
expansive and luxurious marquee was pitched with a canvas 
gallery where the governor and suite could sit and view 
unhindered the aminated scene ; outside of the lines the swarm- 
ing tradesmen and peddlers and hucksters made ready their 
stations and tents and stalls for the expected harvests of the mor- 
row. The people of the region for fifty miles around, excited by 
the rare expectation of beholding a live governor habited in the 
gorgeous uniform of his supreme rank, had made preparations to 
attend in great numbers the biggest show that ever had been 
offered them. The troops began to assemble from all directions 
in companies and 1)attaIions and regiments, and made the village 
sleepless through the long night by the tumult of their coming. 

The morning dawned gloomily with fog on the hills and 
portontious clouds overhead ; ushering in a cold and pitiless 
northeast rain storm. Such weather was fatal to the anticipated 
pleasure and glory of the day. The general disappointment was 
profound. But the troops having been duly ordered to appear 
"armed and equipped" as the law directed, it was held that no 
sort of weather should set the law aside ; moreover the governor's 
public engagements had been so arranged in advance that he was 
obliged to review the Eighth Division on the day appointed if 
ever. Therefore, the exercises were performed stoically and 

Andrew Masters, bom in 1794, was a rcTered and lamented NoTember 7, 1881. 

native of Exeter, N. H., and served an ap- His dust lies in the soil of the old mnster- 

prentic3ship of seven years in a printing field. ^ 

office ; he went to Hallowell in 1815, to "* Samuel K. Oilman was bom in Exeter, 

work at his trade, and in 1820 bacame a N. H., May 2, 1796; when in his twentieth 

member of the book publishing and binding year he removed to Hallowell, and grew to 

firm of Goodale, Glazier & Co., and oon> be one of the sturdy pillars of that town, 

tinned in the same business associated with He was successively promoted to the posi- 

different partners until 18S0. About 1820, tions of Captain of the Hallowell Artillery, 

he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of and Major of the regiment of which it was 

the artillery regiment, which was composed a company. Major Oilman was judge of 

of companies raised in Hallowell, Water- the Hallowell municipal court twenty-six 

ville, Rsadfield and Monmouth. He died years. He died December 26, 1882. 



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MUSTER AT HINKLEY S PLAINS. 



227 



soldier-like amid the discomforts of a pelting rainstorm, and in 
the absence of many thousands of people who would have been 
present if the weather had not been unfavorable. 

Colonel Vaughan's regiment and its accessary of cavalry and 
artillery, — all plumed, tasselled, gilded and polished — marched 
from their respective quaiters through the mud in the drenching 
rain to the saturated field. It was a doleful looking little army. 
OflScers and soldiers could exhibit only their drooping plumes, 
soiled uniforms and muddy boots and ruined gaiters. Under 
stress of the weather little time was lost in needless delays, the 
line was speedily formed, and simultaneously a barouche bearing 
Governor Brooks appeared upon the field ; his Excellency alighted 
at the marquee, and entering it, prepared himself for his duty ; 
he soon emerged in full uniform — wearing a revolutionary 
three-cornered hat, with a large cockade on its left point, and 
a short black plume on its crown ; hispei'son was covered by a 
blue military cloak, the cape of which was deeply bordered with 
red silk velvet, and its front and sides trimmed with gold lace ; 
his breeches were buff and his high swarrow boots of shiny black 
polish, displayed silken tassels below the knees ; a gold-hilted 
sword and gilded scabbard hung by his side. As he mounted 
his horse — a fine dapple-gray clad in rich equestrian trap{)ings — 
an artillery salute was fired in honor of the approach of the 
commander-in-chief. He rode immediately to the right of the 
line and took position preliminary to inspecting it. As he began 
his movement down the line, attended by members of his staff, 
he raised his right hand to his cocked hat, removed it from his 

Additional taxpayers , 1847, — concluded. 



Wm. 


Trotter, 


Sereno S. 


Webster, 


Abby 


Williams, 


Libbeus B. 


Turner, 


Wm. 


Webber, 


James 


Williams, 


Archibald 


Talbot, 


s. S. 


Weston, 


Seth N. 


Williams, 


Mrs. Mary 


Vose, 


Oliver 


Wed^e, 


Hannah M 


. Williams, 


Samnel 


Verrill, 


Gilbsrt 


Wolls, 


Thomas 


Williams, 


James L. 


Vamey, 


Robert M. 


White, 


Sylvester 


Willis, 


Win. L. 


Wend, 


Charles 


White, 


Jos<3ph 


Woodbury, 


Orrin 


Waltz, 


John W. 


White, 


William 


Woodbury, 


Aaron D. 


Wade, 


Seth C. 


Whitehouse, 


John 


Woods, 


Samuel 


Wade, 


Owen C. 


Whitehouse, 


Abner 


Woodsom, 


Daniel 


Wadley, 


Otis 


Whittemore, 


Levi 


Warren, 


Edward 


Wadley, 


Anna 


Whitten, 


John 


Young, 2d, 


Micah 


Walker, 


Jesse 


Wilson, 


Daniel 0. 


Young, 


Phineas 


Walker, 


Paul C. 


Wntheroll. 


Nelson 


Y'oung. 


Sollivan 


Washburn. 


Miss Helen Williams. 







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228 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA, j 

head, and while the merciless rain poured upon his whitened 
locks which fell upon his shoulders, he rode slowly before the 
line looking upon every soldier in it. He was a superb rider, 
and the haimony between the motions of his body and that of the 
handsome horse which bore him made a lasting impression upon 
all who witnessed the performances of the occasion.® 

The inspection ceremony ended, the governor while still 
mounted took station in front of the marquee, and the line 
breaking into column by platoons preceded by the music corps 
marched in review before him — the officers, troops and the 
commander-in-chief exchanging the salutation and recognition 
prescribed by the canons of military courtesy. 

Then the troops, wet and weary, hungry and comfortless, 
were dismissed, and took not unwillingly their departure from 
the poached and mudd^^ field. 

8 William Allen Brew (1798-1879), then fifty yean later, he wrote his recollection 

living in Hallowell, bat afterwards clergy- of the event nnder the title of An Old 

man, editor, and dtizen of Angnsta, was a Fashioned Mtuter, for the Maine Standard, 

musician in the Hallowell Artillery on the Angnsta, issue of October 11, 1887,— from 

occasion of Governor Brooks* review in which the compiler has received aid for this 

1817; he was then nineteen years old; chapter. 



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CHAPTER XL 



MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 

Posterity delights in details. 

John Qttiney Adatnt. 

But once on the KenDebec has man or woman written a life 
record so fully, so artlessly and so eloquently as Mrs. Martha 
Moore Ballard. It is an epic of the fi'ontier when the trees are 
falling before the choppers' axes, and forest openings are 
expanding into fields and farms, and homes are multiplying. 
Only one of great sensibility of nature and ability of performance 
could have been the author of a work so continuous and 
remarkable. 



Additional taxpayers, 1649. 



Jamefl M. 


Adams, 


Jane 


Black, 


Charlotte 


Stephen 


Allen. 


John 


Bolton, 


Maria 


Ambrose P. Arnold, 


Tristram 


Bolton, 


Timothy 


Elisha 


Atkins, 


Dyer, 


Blanding & 


Thomas E. 


DanTille 


Arnold, 


Joseph S. 


Berry, 


Freeman 


Wat. P. Co 


., Augusta, 


Charles W 


. Blodgett, 


Arthur C. 


Leonardo. 


Avery, 


Solomon 


Bruce, 


Charles 


Jotham S. 


Babcock, 


Francis H. 


Brown, 


Martin 


Emery H. 


Butts, 


Sumner 


Bolton, 


Henry C. 


Daniel P. 


Bailey, 


Amos M. 


Bates, 


Ruth 


Patrick 


Burke, 


John W. 


Boyington, 


Jeremiah 


John G. 


Bishop, 


Brown & 


Butler, 


Banks, 


Widow I. 


Bailey, 


Amos 


Bailey, 


David H. 


Benj. 


Britt, jr., 


David 


Brooks, 


Charles B. 


John 


Britt, 


John 


Bennets, 


John 0. 


Ebenezer 


Baker, 


James 


Burbank, 


Rnhama 


Charles 


Booker, 


W^arren 


Barrets, 


George 
Dennis 


George 


Booker, 


Samuel 


Burbank, 


Albert T. 


Beale, 


Stillman A 


. Bates, 


Sylvester 


Hamilton 


Briwrg, 


Thomas 


Burbank, 


Mrs. Susan 


David 


Bean, 


Daniel 


Bennett, 


David 


David D. 


Blunt, 


WiuBlow 


Burden, 


Roswell M. 


Charles 


Bacheider, 


Columbus 


Burrell, 


Joseph 


Elbridgel. 
James F. 


Ralph 


Butler, jr., 


George 


Brown, 


Frank N. 


Church, 


Charles 


Joseph P. 


Burbank. 


Franklin H 


. Chadwick, 


Cvms 


Blanchard & Brown, 


Henderson 


Chambers, 


Elbridge A. 


Obadiah 


Blanding, 


George Y. 


Colburn, 


Daniel 


Stephen 
Joel 


Boynton, 


Mary J. 


Carter, 


James 


Boynton, 


Amasa L. 


Cook, 


Albert G. 


Thomas 


Butman, 


Samuel B. 


Charles, 


Joseph 


David 


Briden. 


Lewis D. 


Clark. 


Howard A. 



Child, 

Child, 

Cranny, 

Church, 

Crowell, 

Clark, 

Cummings, 

Colman, 

Clough, 

CaldweU, 

Craney, 

Cross & 

Crowell, 

Caswell, 

Curtis, 

Caldwell, 

Coombs, 

Coombs, 

Doyle, 

Day, 

Day, 
. Danforth, 

Dudley, 

Dav, 

Dutton, 

Dutton, 
. Dutton, 

Denniston, 

Drummond, 

Dole, 

Devine, 

Doe. 



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230 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



It is the journal of a wife and mother noting the daily incidents 
of her household, and such various happenings among the 
neighbors, and current bits of news as specially interested her. 
Intermixed with a large proportion of personal and family 



Additional tctxpayersj 1849 ^ — oontinaed. 



s. 

Robert 


Dorr, 
Doyle, 


Asa 


Dearborn, jr.. 


Calvin 


Dearborn, 


Martin 


Dowling, 


John 


Donnavan, 


Jeremiah 


Donnivan, 


John R. 


Daley, 


Elijah 


Daley, 
Dnnlap, 


Royal 


Oliver 


Davis, 


Atwood 


Davis, 


Samnel 


Dudley, 


John 


Dooley, 


Charles H. 


Edwards, 


A.M. 


Emery, 


Alamanda 


Ellis, 


William S. 


Elwin, 


Jamea P. 


Evans, 


William W 


. Eaton, 


Clarke L. 


Ferron, 


Dmmmond Farnsworth, 


Frederick 


Faught, jr.. 


Brian 


Fellows. 


Benjamin S.Famham, 


David 


Fales, 


Elizabeth 


Fifleld, 


Aaron L. 


Folsom. 


Mrs. H.W. Fuller. 


Henry L. 


Fuller, 


Mary 


I-^ler, 


Jeremiah 


Furbush, 


Eliza W. 


Fuller, 


Henry D. 


Faught, 


Isaac 


Garfield, 


James 


Fagan, 


Joshua 


Golder, 


David 


George 


Goodwin, 


WiUiam 


. Green, 


Leonard 


Grey, 


Joshua 


Greenleaf, 


Zina H. 


Greenwood, 


Artemas 


Glidden, 


Seth 


Garland, 


Daniel C. 


Gardiner, 


Harrison 


Getchell, 


Warren 


Gilman, 


James W. 


Gray, 


Henry J. 
SethB. 


Goldthwaite, 


Goodwin, 


A. A. 


Greenwood, 


James M. 


Hall, 


Joseph N. 


Hall, 


John H. 


Harrington, 


James 


Hall, 2d, 


Amos 


Heald. 



John M. 

Michael 

John 

James 

James B. 

Elias G. 

Widow 

George 

Nathan 

John 

Charles 

James 

George 

Edgar 

Oliver P. 

James M. 

John 

Eben 

Rollins 

William 

David 

Harvey 

Randall 

L.D. 

George 

Henry H. 

Ariel 

Thomas 

Anthony O, 

Horace 

Han-ey 

Clarissa 

John L. 

Isaac 

Loring 

Hiram 

Robert 

George H. 

Francis 

Daniel 

Nathaniel 

John 

Alanson 

Charles 

Miles 

WiUiam 

John 

NoahB. 

Daniel H. 

Amaziah 

Artemas L. 

James 

William 

Edmund 

Timothy 

John 

Albion I. 



Hall, 
Head, 
Hall, 
Hersom, 
Hall, 
Hedge, 
Hallett, 
Hewins, 
Hallett, 
Hudson, 
HiU, 
Hay den, 
Hersev, 
Hilton, 
Hayes, 
Hilton, 
Holt, 
Hawes, 
Hodgkins, 
Hodgkins, 
Hodgkins, 
Hawes, 
Hopkins, 
Hoyt, 
Herrick, 
Hoxie, 
Huntington, 
Hicks, 
, Harvey, 
Hinkley, 
Huntoon, 
Hill, 
Hoyt, 
Holmes, 
Judkins, 
Jacobs, 
Jordan, 
Jones, 
Jackson, 
Judkins, 
Jones, 
Jones, 
Keene, 
Keene, jr., 
Keene, 
Kesne, 
Kilsa, 
Kent, 
Kilbreth, 
Kelloch, 
KimbaU, 
Kelley, 
Kennedy, jr., 
Kelsa, 
Kendall, 
Kinsman, 
Kimball. 



William 

Stephen S. 

William 

Charles A. 

Daniel 

Isaac 

Thomas 

Moses D. 

Convers 

Nathan 

Stephen 

John 

Patrick 

John 

Leonard 

Orrin 

William 

James 

Henry B. 

Augustus 

Palmer 

John H. 

Hawes, 

Nathaniel 

Thomas 

Alexander 

John 

William 

Wyman, 

Daniel 

David 

Thomas 

LotM. 

Geo. S. 

Wm. H. 

Andrew 

Brackett 

Thomas 

William 

Patrick 

James O. 

Florentius 

Edward 

F. D. 



Kimball, 

Knowles, 

Little, 

Lambard, 

Lincoln, jr., 

Lilly, 

Lilly, 

Linn, 

Lowell, 

Longfellow, 

Lord, 

Lambert, 

Laughton, 

Laughlin, 

Landers, 

Lee man, 

Leeman, 

Leighton, 

Lincoln, 

Lovejoy, 

Lovejoy, 

Lynde. 

Maul OL 

Maxey, 

Maxey, 

McCausland, 

McArthur, 

Morey, 

Morse & 

Mosier, 

Mosier, 

Morton, 

Morrill, 

MuUiken, 

Morton, 

Mason, 

Marston, 

McKenney, 

McDavid, 

McGraw, 

Means, 

Merrill, 

Merrow, 

Merrow, 



Benjamin P.Miller, 



Seth 

Benjamin 

Charles 

S. W. 

David 

Patrick 

Moses 

Charles B. 

Bartlett, 

Nathaniel 

Seth 

Joseph 



Moody, 

Mowrey, jr., 

Moore, 

Moulton, 

Mosier, jr., 

McMurrey, 

Morrell, 

Messer, 

Morton & 

Nason, 

Nason, 

Nichols. 



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MRS. BALLABD'S diary. 



231 



matters are numerous nuggets of the pure ore of local history. 
We see interesting phases of life and character among the early 
settlers. Facts and occurrences often commonplace and trivial 
' by themselves become interesting through their connection with 
human lives, and infuse with color and animation the pictures 
of the past. 

The Diary begins with the revival of the settlement after the 
depressing years of the revolution, and covers the most important 
and interesting em in the early history of the town. Many 
events of local magnitude come within its purview, among them, 
the settlement of the first minister; the opening of the 
Hallowell Academy ; the bridging of the Kennebec river ; the 
incorporation of Augusta ; the division of the county ; the 
building of the first school-house ; the pacification of the 
squatters and land proprietors through the delirium of the 
Malta war. The Diarist was an actor and participator as a 
contemporary in all of those agencies and evidences of public 
progress. 



Additional 

Joseph 

Isaac 

Nathaniel 

Hannah 

Martin 

Alfred 

Rev. 

Peter 

Robert P. 

Jeannette 

James L. 

Rnfns 

William 

Chnrch, 

William 

Collins 

Edward B. 

Betbnel 

Josiah M. 

Samnel N. 

Daniel F. 

John 

Benjamin 

Elijah 

James 

Nathaniel 

Samuel 

Frank 

Amasa 

Charles 

Peter 



taxpayers, 1849,- 

Nickless, 

Noyes, 

Noyes, 

North, 

Nolan, 

Oliver, 

O'Rlelley, 

O'Brien, 

Owen, 

Perley, 

Plnmmer, 

Plnmmer, 

Plnmmer, 

Plaisted & 

Plaisted, 

Pratt, 
. Potter, 

Perry, 

Potter, 

Pierce, 

Potter, 

Pinkham, 

Pray, 

Paine, 

Paine, 

Paine, 

Pillsbnry, 

Parker, 

Plnmmer, 

Parks, 

Plummer. 



, — continued. 
Stephen Perkins, 
Nathan Pratt, 
Isaac Peckman, 

Abraham Powers, 
Howard Pettengill, 
G. & S. Pullen, 
Carlos W. Pease, 
Deane Pray, 

Philander Percival, 
Banforth Prescott, 
Ijdwis S. Pickett, 
QeoTf^e Packard, 
Prentiss P. Pierce, 
Anjnistns Parlin, 
Ezekiel Page, 2d, 
A. Morton. Page, 
Alvah I. Pierce, 
Andrew I. Pierce, 
Newell Pierce, 

Horatio Pinkham, 
Ken. & Port Railroad Co., 
Randall & Roberts, 
Abraham Regal, 
Adoriam Reynolds, 
Daniel Ripley, 

Wm. S. Read, 
Ephraim Rice, 
Joseph F. Rice, 
Edward A. Robinson, 
E. K. Robinson, 

Lorenzo Redman. 



SethL. 

Benjamin 

Charles 

Newton 

David 

John A. 

John 

George W. 

David 

Edwin 



Randall, 

Ray, 

Ray, 

Reynolds, 

Rohan, 

Richards, 

Ripley, 

Ricker, 

Robbins, 

Robbins, 



Benjamin CRobbinson, 



John W. 

Samnel S. 

Stephen K, 

George 

Hiram 

Joseph 

John 

James W. 

Charles 

Daniel 

Alonzo 

Sarah H. 

Hezekiah 

Mrs 

Joel 



Rowe, 
Rogers, 
Rogers, 
Rollins, 
Rollins, 
Row Be, 
Rushlow, 
Sanford, 
Seekins, 
Shorey, j*-., 
Smiley, 
Suell, 
Smiley, 
Jacob Stanwood, 
Staples, 



Milton Stone, 

Greenleaf Smart, 
James L. Sanford, 
Augustus A.Safford, 
Job Samson. 



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232 



HISTORT OF AUGUSTA. 



Beside filling her higher office of devoted matron of her home, 
Mrs. Ballard perfonned for many years, with extraordinary 
success, the service of midwife, nurse and physician in the 
families of her town's-people and in the towns neighboring. The ' 
territory of her field of practice was but sparsely settled ; yet 
the most of the marriages in those times were abundantly 
fruitful, and the careful aid of the skilled and experienced mid- 
wife was often in demand. At the end of her practice, a few 
weeks before her death, Mra Ballard recorded the nine hundred 
and ninety-sixth biith which she had professionally attended. 

This large number of obstetrical cases represents only a 
portion of the humanitarian work of Mrs, Ballard. It was 
constantly her bent and pleasure to do good. The call of the 
sick and suffering among her friends and neighbors ever met 
with her sympathetic response and drew her quickly to the 
bedside of the stricken one, to patiently minister there as 
physician, nurae and comforter. She dressed with soft and 
tender touch the tiny new-born child and lay it sleeping on its 
grateful mother's breast ; and perhaps the next hour in another 
household from which the angel of death had summoned a loved 
member, she robed the limp and lifeless body for its burial. 

She was unlearned in the sciences which make the equipment 
of the modern physician and surgeon. Her medicines were 



Additional 


taxpayers, 1649,— conduced. 


Richard 


Sanborn, 


Charles 


Thomas, 


W. W. 


Sawyer, 


Francis 


Thompson, 


Erastas 


Seffarse, 


Richard E 


Thompson, 


OrrlnC. 


Severanc, 


John W. 


Toward, 


Nathaniel 


Sparhawk, 


B.C. 


Thompson, 


Jacob 


Sparhawk, 


Harvey 


Taylor, 


Reuben 


Sparhawk, 


Joseph 


Thompson, 


Panl D. 


Small, 


John £. 


Varney, 


John P. 


Spooner, 


Samuel 


Vassel, 


Charles A. 


Smith, 


Wm. H. 


Vivian, 


Reuben C. 


Smith, 


L. B. 


Varney, 


Charles W 


. Swanton, 


William R 


. Weston, 


Charles F. 


Swan, 


John E. 


Ward, 


James 


Stanley, 


William L. 


Ward, 


Thomas L. 


Tappan, 


John 


Wakefield, 


John C. 


Tibb3tts, 


Reuel 


West, 


Benjamin 


Titcomb, 


Ambrose 


Whitehouse, 


Abner 


Town, 


£1 bridge 


Whitehouse, 


Charles 


Turner, 


Widow F. 


Whitnev, 


Elijah 


Turner, 


Hiram W. 


Wetherbee, 


Charles 


Tavlor, 


Mary S. 


Williams, 


William 


Taylor, 


Sarah L. 


Williams, 


Charles H. 


Thomas, 


David 


Walton, 


William H 


. Thomas. 


Isaac A. 


Waterhoase. 



Chas. 

Baker 

James 

Maurice 

Joseph R. 

Aufi^Qstine 

John B. 

Franklin I. 

John N. 

Samuel 

Orin 

Elias W. 

Samuel 

Jacobs. 

Henry 

Charles 

John 

John 

James 

Jotham 

Michael 

David I. 



Wentworth, 

Weston, 

W^hite, . 

Whitney, 

Whittier, 

Williams, 

Williamson, 

Wood, 

Wood. 

Williamson, 

Williamson, 

Williamson, 

Winter, 

Woods, 

Woods, 

Teaton, 

Younff, 

Youuff, Jr., 

Young, 

Young, 

Young. 

Young. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 233 

chiefly laxatives and tonics and vermifuges, compounded of 
familiar herbs and roots gathered by herself in the fields and 
pastures around her home. The rewards and emoluments of her 
practice wera infinitesimal compared with the vast amount and 
exacting nature of her labors. Her uniform fee for waiting upon 
a mother in childbirth was nine shillings, however long or 
difficult and dangerous the roads traveled ; but oftentimes not 
the whole and sometimes not even a part of that pittance was 
paid bjf reason of the indigence of the patients. She was 
however occasionally the recipient of sums larger than her 
regular fee from wealthy or well-to-do patrons, and she never 
omitted to thankfully mention the bounty in her journal. Her 
care and vigils in the sick-rooms generally were labors of love 
which were seldom requited with money, except as she took pay 
when it was oflfered for medicines and salves which she 
manufactured from her own simple pharmacopoeia. 

The Diary is in fine and compact chirography, and in print 
unabridged would make a book of more than a thousand pages. 
It is a monumental instance of persistency and punctuality and 
voluminousnessin private journal-keeping. The contents relate 
chiefly to the author in her ever-pressing domestic and 
professional employments and to the incidents of her household 
and family circle. Much is manifestly confidential, having been 
written in the freedom of the privacy of her home without a 
thought of publicity. Every phase of domestic life in the early 
yeara of the town is vividly exhibited : the busy matron engrossed 
in the multifarious occupationsof her household, assisted by her 
dutiful daughters who shrink not from the service and toil 
hallowed by the hands of their loving mother; the endless 
routine of the kitchen, the churn and cheese press, the spinning- 
wheel and weaving-loom — all of the features and paraphernalia 
of the typical settler's habitation — are brought to view in the 
faded lines of the time colored manuscript. Notwithstanding a 
vast surplusage of now unimportant details of family afiairs, we 
obtain many rare and excellent flash-light views of the times in 
which the venerable Diarivst lived. 

The sewing-circle arfd the quilting-bee were then the principal 



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234 HISTORr OF augusta. 

social feminine neighborhood events. The Diary is a panorama 
of social backwoods h"fe, — realistic picture — the only one ex- 
tant, — of early Hallo well and Augusta. A great deal is trivial 
and unimportant, much being but a repetition of what has been 
recited many times. In many instances they are so similar, that 
to repeat them would be useless labor. 

The Diary recites the names and preserves the memory of 
many of the people who made the early life and history of the 
town. In its antiqui3 pages there passes in review the living 
population of men and women and children of the period. We 
have glimpses of the customs and usages, the hospitalities and 
enjoyments, the deprivations and sometimes sufferings of the 
settlers. The good woman takes us over rough and devious 
roads to the anxious homes of expectant patients awaiting the 
dread but joyful hour of motherhood ; and there l>eneiicently 
presiding with a success far exceeding that of the more 
learnedly pretentious male practitioners of the region, in her 
day, she humbly bestows all the credit upon God, and leaves 
"mother and child cleverly." We sit with her by the liedside 
of the sick and languishing father or mother, or youth, or maiden, 
or child, and after the end has come, when her soothing 
ministrations are no longer needed, she weeps and mourns with 
the bereaved family and goes in the little procession to the 
burial. She takes us to her place of worship — the town 
meeting house in Market Square — where it was her delight to 
sit with her husband and children and listen to the discourses 
of her revered pastors. The religious element in her character 
was very pronounced, but her religion was emotional and 
practical nither than doctrinal. Her long life, meek and un- 
pretending, was rich in good works and usefulness ; her 
memory is worthy to be enshrined with those of all truly great 
and noble women everywhere. 

The following pages contain extracts from the Diary. ^ 

1 The Diary, in two carefully bound vol- The compiler of this History is under 

nmes, is in possession, by inheritance, of Dr. obligations to Dr. Hobart for an opporta- 
Mary F. Hobart, a great-grand-daughter, nity to copy the entire MS. 
and a practicing physician, 657 Boylston 
street, Boston, Mass. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 



235 



1785. 

1785. January 1. Satarday. Mr. Ballard left home. 

2. I returned from Oxford. It snowed a little. 

3. Esther Ballard deceased, 22 years, 80 days, at 9 o*clock, evening. 

5. I had threats of the cholic, by taking pepper foand relief. Mr. Purkins 
here. 

8. Capt Hatches family here. Studley Springer carried me to his house. 
Put Mrs. Springer to bed with a daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Pollard here. 

11. Went to George Bolton's to see his daughter. Found the child better. 
14. Called to Bolton's. Rode home on a sled. 
16. Put Mrs. Savage to bed with a daughter. 

2G. Hannah went to Mr. Ingraham*s with Hannah Crage [Craig] and tarried 
at C rage's all night. 

28. I hired Hannah Barton to do the kitchen work. Dressed John Forbyss 
[Forbes'] fingers. 

29. Mr. Ballard returned trom the westward. 

Feb. 6. I was called at 11 o'clock to Mr. Toleman's; a fatiguing ride; ac- 
companied by Toleman to the Fort; ft-om thence by Asa Williams. Found 
Mrs. Tolman delivered of a fine son, but before I left put her to bed safely. 

6. Returned trom Toleman's attended by Mr. Ingraham who dined with us. 

9. Selectmen here. Colo. North and Lady, Capt. Cox and Lady, and Mrs. 
Cox here. 

11. Mr. and Mrs. Weston here. Augustus Ballard came for burn salve for 
his toe, ft-oze ; tarries to-night. 

16. Mr. Forbes made a coat for Mr. Ballard. 

18. I was called to Nathan Tilars [Tyler's] at 11, at evening. 

20. My birth-day, 60 years old. Was at Tilar's. Mrs. Tilar unwell. 

22. Mr. Benjamin Brannad [Bralnard] conducted me fk*om Tilar's to Mr. 
Floid'8. I put Mrs Floid to bed with a daughter at 9 o'clock, evening. 

28. Came ft-om Floid's about daybreak. Left her comfortable. Cyrus and 
Hannah set out for Sebastacook. Moon ftilled this day, llh. Om. afternoon. 

March 1. Cyrus went home with Mr. BuUin's sleigh. Brought news of 
Mr. Prescott's house being burnt. 



Janaary 5. Jonathan Perkins, a settler 
who came here from Upper Oilman ton, N. 
H. His death is recorded in the entry for 
March 19, 1808. 

January 8. (1) Capt. David Hatch was 
first taxed here in 1777. (2) Amos Pollard, 
the inn-keeper and ferryman. 

January 26. Ellas Craig (1756-1837) 
lived at the southwest comer of the present 
Water and Bridge streets. 

January 29. The Diarist employs the 
term "from the westward" to designate the 
region of her former home in Massachu- 
setts. 



February 5. Samuel Tolman lived on 
the ancient forts Weston-Halifax road 
about three miles northerly from Fort 
Western. His name was given to Tolman 
pond. He was an original settler on lot 
forty-two. A little stream flowing from 
his farm into the Kennebec is known as 
Tolman brook to this day. 

February 6. The Diarist and family then 
lived where now stands "Olen Cottage," 
near the lower mill-site on Bond brook. 

February 11. The parents of Chief 
Justice Nathan, Weston (1782-1872). 



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236 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1785. March 2. I was called to Savage Bolton's. Pat his wife to bed with 
a daughter at 5 o'clock, afternoon. 
8. Gate Cobb here. Lucy and Hannah went to Mr. Crage's. 

8. Mr. Ballard went to Doctor Cony's on public business. 

9. Mr. Ballard brought home a yoke of oxen which he bought of Moses 
White. 

11. Col. North, Mr. Brooks, and Mr. Ballard laid out road. 

12. I went to the Hook. Carried Dolly to try on her gown. 

1 6. Mr. Ballard at town-meeting and at lecture. Rev. Mr. Miller of Brunswick, 
propounded the examination. Hannah, Dolly, and Cowen, attended. 

19. James Moore came to conduct me to Nath'l Tylar's. I arrived about 
sun setting. Put Mrs. Tylar to bed with a son at 8 o'clock in the evening. 

20. Returned from Tylar's. Poll Savage here. Informed me of the death 
of Bei^. Brown's daughter Nabby. Mr. Burn and his brother Jesse, and 
Hannah Craig, Jack North here. 

21. I attended fUneral of BenJ. Brown's daughter Nabby who deceased the 
19th inst., being 4 years and 1 day old. Mr. Ballard and select gentlemen at 
Isaac Clark*s. 

22. Mr. Ballard gone to Bumber Hook, making rates [assessing taxes] ■ 

25. Hannah and Dolly gone out, pastime. 

26. Mr. Ballard wrote warrants. Hannah finished Ephraim's shirt. 

27. Theophalus Hamlen arrived here from Oxford, by whom we received a 
letter fl*om Brother Collins Moore which informs me of the death of Ebenezer 
Davis' wife ; Capt. Lambert, wife of Charlton, Solomon Cook ; and Ebenezer 
Davis' young wife died in childbed ; infant deceased also. He informed me of 
the death of Old Lady Harris. 

28. I went to see Woodward Allen's wife. Saw Mrs. Hardin there. 

80. My son Ephraim's birthday, aged 6 years. Jonathan brought hay flrom 
Docter Cony's. 

81. Called about day to go to Mr. Wellman's, Ephraim Cowan went with us 
as far as the plain beyond £. J. Howard's bridge, where we met a message 
informing [that] the woman was got safe to bed. Turned about and returned 
home. I had two falls, one on my way there, the other on my return. The 
storm continues yet; the snow is level with the top of the lower pane of 
glass of our north window. I traveled some rods in the snow where it was 
almost as high as my waist. Stopped at Mr. Tuck's and warmed. Cowan 
got Colonel Howard's sleigh and brought me ft*om Mr. Tuck's. Got home at 
8 o'clock. 

April 2. Jonathan and Cowen came to attend ftineral of Ebenezer Taylor, 
who departed this life yesterday. 

March 19. James Moore lived near the loc; they had thirteen children. He died 

line between ancient Hallowell (now in 1809. 

Angnsta) and Readfield (now Manchester) . March 31 . Abraham Wellman was then 

Nathaniel Tyler lived in the westerly part a recent settler within the present town of 

of the town. His wife was Rebecca Sher- Belgrade. 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 237 



1785. April 8. Mr. Ballard went to Thomas SewalVs to hear Mr. Kinsman 
preach. Speak at evening. 

10. I was called at a little past 12 in the mom by Mr. Edson to go to his 
wife [she] being in travail. Walked to the bank over the point. Was drawn 
by Edson and Wm. Canady. The river dangerous, bat arrived safe, throagh 
divine protection. 

11. At 4 and 20 min. mom. Mrs. Edson was delivered of a son which 
weighed 7 1-2 lbs., and at 6 and 6 minutes, of another son which weighed 8 8-4 lbs. 
Left her at about 10. Mr. Ballard coming there at that time. Informed of 
the death of our grand-son, John Town, who last Thursday mom. drank so 
much spirit that [it] caused his death, which happened yesterday at 8 in the 
morn. On my retum fh>m Mrs. Edson's Mrs. Weston called me in, Nathan 
being sick. 

12. Jonathan is gone to Winslow to son Town's to attend iVineral of their 
son. I went to bed, but thinking of my children's trouble could not compose 
[myself] to sleep. At 11 o'clock, evening, Woodward Allen called me up. 
Went by land to Colo. North's. Very bad walking. We carried a candle to 
the top of Burnt Hill. Between 12 and 1 arrived at Allen's. I was much 
fiitigued. 

18. Mrs. Allen delivered of a daughter at 4 this morning. I returned home 
at 11 o'clock. I took a knap of sleep this afternoon. Mr. Woodward here. 
14. I was at home. Let John Shaw have loz. of salve for eight pence. 
17. Informed that Jonathan Wyman's wife deceased last evening. 

20. Mr. Canady [Kennedy] and Church here, getting logs into the brook. 

21. Colo. Howard, Mr. Brooks, and Doctor Colman here. Informed of the 
death of Lieutenant Howard, who departed this life yesterday. 

22. Mr. Ballard attended ftineral of Lieut. Howard. The corpse were 
brought on a sleigh up the river to Colo. Howard's in the morning. The 
ftineral at two o'clock. I was at Mr. Weston's. Saw thewiddow drawn 
down river at about six, afternoon, in the sleigh. Drawn by men. I tarried 
at Mr. Weston's all night. Took care of Jimmy. 

28. At Mr. Weston's till after dinner. Mr. Weston returned A"om Boston. 
Got home about 12 o'clock. Crossed the river on the ice. Mrs. Pollard and 
I at Colo. North's. Drank tea. 

April 3. Probably Rev. Ebenezer Kins- Kennebec in 1780, and settled near the place 

man who, after several years of labor as a that is now called Baoon's Comer in Sidney, 

licenciate preacher, was ordained pastor of His wifb was Margaret Howard. They 

the Baptist church in Limerick, county of left descendants. 

York, in 1796; he resigned in 1807. One April 21. Samuel Howard, an elder 

of his sons was John Kinsman (1800- brother of Captain James Howard (1702- 



of Angnsta (see Kinsman family). 1787), and the original settler on lot number 
April 10. Calvin Edson then lived near one, west side, next to Hallowell. Inter- 
Kennedy brook. ment in the Fort bnrying ground. The 
April 12. Colonel Joseph North lived memorial slab bearing name, date of death, 
where the Granite Bank building now and age, which was placed at the grave, was 
stands. removed to the Riverside cemetery in 1866. 
April 17. Jonathan Wyman came to the 



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238 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1785. April 24. I was called at 2 o'clock in the morn to go to the Hook to 
Mrs. Blake in travail. Went Winthrop road aboat 4 miles ; from that to Blake's 
near four miles. Arrived before the sun rose. Found Mrs. Blake delivered of a 
son by the help of Peter Clark's wife. Received 4 shillings for njy trouble. 
Returned to Foster's on hoi*seback ; fVom thence walked home attended by 
Mr. Foster. I was much fatigued. Then called to Isaac Savage's to see 
Hannah, his daughter. Returned home at 10 in evening. On return Mr. 
Ballard found the boome logs and boards all afloat. Hamlen, Bobbins, Cowin, 
and Jonathan got out of bed and went to secure them. People passed on the 
ice from Fort Western this day. 

25. The ice went out of the river. Backed the water up to the lower floor 
of the grist-mill. The jams removed about six o'clock. Theopholis [Hamlen] 
and Cyrus [Ballard] tended saw-mill till three in morn. 

26. Jonathan hurt his foot with a slab. Mr. BuUin's barn burnt yesterday 
at 11 o'clock in mom. 

27. Mr. Ballard gone to Colo. Howard's mill to repair it. 

28. John Pinkham here for herbs for his child that is unwell. The ice runs 
in the river this day. Mr. Forbes has made me a part of a saddle. I was at 
home all day. 

30. I had three brooms of Mr. Smith, let him have 8 : 4d. [three and four pence] 
in cash and lib. of cofiee. Our saw-mill stopt by the back water. A great 
cry for provisions ; no vessel arrived yet. The ice run this day. 
May 3. Capt. Nichols of Oxford, here. Our friends are all well. 

4. Capt. Howard and Smith came up to Mr. Pollard's Eddy. Mr. Blackman 
and sister here from westward. 

6. I went to Doctor Cony's by water with Cyrus. Paid the Doctor's 
bill for my sickness last December, which was 9 :6 [nine and sixpence]. On 
our return [we] were obliged to call Mr. McMasters' assistance to get by the 
rock. 

6. Was at Mr. Weston's ; his sloop came up. His wife rode out, is more 
comfortable. Mr. Ballard and I went on board Capt. Smith, bought some 
flour. 

8. Collins Moore, Mr. Davis, and Thos. McKeckney here. 

9. Old Mr. Whealer here and dined. Mr. Ballard gone to settle with Mr. 
Gardner, Perkins, and Moore for building the mill. 

10. Mr. Straton and Hayward brought the logs. Wm. Cowen's wife here. 

11. Town meeting. I combed flax — afternoon. 
15. Mehitible Pollard was married this day. 

17. David Pollard's logs brought into the brook. This day Mr. Ballard is 
sixty years old. 

April 24. The wife of John Blake of the the place that was then called Pollard's 

Hook, a settler there in 1785. The Diarist Eddy. 

went to her patient by way of the present May 5. (1) Dr. Daniel Cony was then 

Manchester Cross-roadi to avoid the ordeal living on a lot that has since become a part 

of fording Kennedy brook, which had been of the Insane Hospital farm. (2) Referr> 

swollen by the spring melting of the snow. ingto the Mile Rock. 

May 4. Steamboat wharf now covers 



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MH8. BALLARD*S DIARY. 239 

1785. May 18. I went to Mr. Woodward's, Ellis*, and Daniel Bolton's. 
Betsy Chever here. 

21. I was called to Mr. Ellis' at 10 o'clock, afternoon, his wife in travail. 
She was delivered of a son at 1 o'clock the next morn. 
24. Mr. Ballard gone to Mr. James Oowen's as a referee on a cause between 
Jonas Clark and Henry Babcock. Thomas White came to tend saw-mill. 

26. Clear. Mrs. Weston rode as far as here. 

27. Mr. Hamlen arrived here f^om the westward. 

31. Asa Williams came for me to go to his wife. I went as far as Crage's. 
Crossed the river and went on horseback in great haste ; found her safely 
delivered by Old Mrs. Ingraham. 

June 2. I went to Mr. Weston's [in the] afternoon. Called at Mr. Brooks', 
and Mr. Blssbees'. 

4. Mrs. Gardy went from here to Colo. North's. Hannah and Polly Hamlen 
went with her. Mr. Twing [Thwing] brought Mr. Ballard's breaches 
[breeches]. 

6. Was called to Mr. Suel's [Sewall's] to see his wife ; found her very 
unwell, but left her more comfortable about the middle of the day. 

9. I was called in haste to Daniel Bolton's, — his wife being in travail. 
She was safely delivered at about 12 o'clock of a fine daughter. I left her 
very comfortable, and returned home before sunset. Fee not paid. 

12. Sunday. Our family went to Mr. Suel's [Sewall's] to meeting. 

16. Mr. Ballard bought 1-2 a bushel of pork and a tea-kettle. It thunders 
to-night. I had news of Brother Moore's saw-mill being consumed by fler, 
also 70 thousand of good boards belonging to George Brown. 

19. I attended meeting at the meeting-house ; went to Mr. Weston's at 
intermission. Mr. Cony made a prayer and read a sermon in the morning. - 
Mr. Babcock performed, afternoon. 

20. I went with Mr. Ballard to Doctor Cony's to see his house raised. 

21. I was called at two o'clock in morning to go to Bunker Farwell's ; got 
there at sunrise. I put Mrs. Farwell to bed at S in the afternoon, with a 
daughter. Returned home at eleven, evening. Had a fit of the cramp and 
fainting also ; Dolly got up and brought me the lavender which revived me 
much. 

24. I am at Mr. Town's [at Win slow]. Mrs. Stagpole [Stack pole] came to 
see us. I went to the river with her, missed my way returning home. Mr. 
Lewis and Betsy Town went to seek me. At length I found my way home, 
though some fatigued. 

25. I went with Mrs. Town to see Mrs. Dexter. Mrs. Stratton there. 

26. I went with son and daughter to Mr. Stackpoal's. 

27. I went with Mrs. Straton and Mrs. Town to Captain Hayward's. 
July 1. I was at ditto. Mrs. Cragen, Hall, and Barton made us a visit. 
5. Mr. Town went to Fort Halifax to attend town-meeting. Mrs. 

Hay ward and her daughter Stratton and Haille were at Mr. Town's. Drank 
tea. 

May 18. Betsy Cheever became the wife Jane 20. This was afterwards known as 

of Ciiptain Thomas Fillebrown. the Tobey hoase. 



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240 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1785. July 9. Mr. Town came home. Bronght news that Mr. Ballard was 
gone to Casco to coart, as an eyidence in behalf of Emmerson. 

15. Mr. Lais [Luce] went to watch with Mr. Thorn, who departed this 
life about the middle of the night. 

17. Sunday. Clear. I attended fbneral of Old Mr. Thorn. Capt. Flllbrook 
made a prayer on the occasion. The corpse were carried by water [to burial- 
place] and there interred. I returned fVom grave on boat with Esq. Pettee. 
Betsy went to the grave to attend Aineral with us. Mrs. Collar was delivered 
last night of a dead child. 

18. Mrs. Brewer and Folly Fouler [Fowler] at son Town's all day. 
21. Betsy and I went to the field, and got sennakle root. 

28. Daughter Town unwell all day. Called her women together about two 
o'clock, afternoon; was safely delivered of a danghter at 7 o'clock, but 
somewhat weak. I sat up with her all night. 

24. I left Mr. Town's at 10 o'clock In the mom ; arrived at home about six. 

25. I went to Doctor Cony for some medicine for Mrs. Stratton. Pollard 
stubbed his foot to-day. 

2G. I was at home all day ; collecting herbs. 

27. I went to Mr. Weston's to see Folly Adams, she being lame. 

28. Mr. Lelghton here. Informed that Mrs. Hersy was delivered of a son. 
31. Old Mrs. Hawes and danghter, and sister Moore here at noon; they and 

many more people called after meeting. Mr. Ballard and I went to see them 
up the rips. 
August 1. Dolly rode a horse to plough. 

4. Mr. Ballard went to survey for Mr. Dutch. Mrs. Church is ill. Mrs« 
Winslow with her. 

10. I was called to Mr. Edson's to see his burnt foot ; found it bad ; drest 
it and left some salve. Augustus Ballard came for Alice. 

11. Called to Mr. Church's about day. She being in travail; was delivered 
about 5 o'clock, p. m., of a daughter; the operation performed by Mrs, 
Winslow. 

12. I was at Mr. Edson's ; Doctors Williams and Colman there to see hia 
foot, which he burnt. 

19. I attended lecter [lecture]. Went trom meeting to Mr. Suel'a 
[Se wall's], to see Capt. Suel's foot, it being scalt. Drank tea there. James 
Moore called me f^om there to go to Simmion Clark's wife, she being in 
travail; was safely delivered of a daughter at 11 o'clock, evening. 

July 31. The rapids of Cnshnoc, now (1724>1802), was a pioneer settler on the 

occupied in part by the Kennebec dam. north-western lot in the modem town of 

August 4. Mrs. James (Hnston) Wins- Randolph. Mrs. Winslow was the devoted 

low (1734-1824), a midwife, of Pittston. mother of ten chUdren, the most of whom 

She was familiarly called Granny Whislow, lived to adolt age, and married and left 

and filled relatively the same field of ser- descendants. See Hanson's History of 

vice in ancient Pittston as did Mrs. Ballard Gardiner, etc., for a list of the names of her 

in ancient Hallo well and its environs, — children and of some of her grandchildren, 

that of physician, midwife and nnr^e; August 10. Augnstna Ballard lived at 

her drcnlt extended from Hallowell j to Bowman's Point. 
Bath. Her husl>and, James Winslow 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 241 

1785. AugQst 20. I came home A*om Mr. Clark's. Oar men cleared the 
crick [creek] of sunken stuff. 

21. Sunday. I went to meeting. The sacrament administered. Mr. 
Ballard and I partook. 

22. Doctor Barton and wife came here ; the Doctor went to Cobese 
(Cobbosseecontee) . 

23. Mr. Ballard and I, and sister Barton, Cyrus and Dolly and Pollard, 
went to see Norcrosses vessel launched. 

25. Mr. Pollard, Weston, and Betsy Cheever here. 

26. Doctor Barton came flrom Cobose, dined here. Went home to 
Vassalboro in the afternoon. I went to see them up the rips. 

September 6. The town meeting to-day to hire Mr. Noble. Voted to hire 
him till March. 

9. I went to Esqr. Howard's and Mr. SueUs to visit the sick. Mr. Suel 
made me a present of a calf-skin. I was called at 10 o'clock in the evening to 
Ezra Hodge's wife, she being in travail. I walked there In 20 minutes. , 

10. Mrs. Hodges was safely delivered of a daughter at 6 o'clock this 
morning. I returned home at ten. 

11. Sunday. I got ready to go to Esqr. Howard's, and it rained and I put 
it by. Informed that Mrs. McMaster had got to bed, and her child was 
deceased. The Aineral to-morrow. 

12. I went to Esqr. Howard's to take care of Alvin Weeks and Polly Briant, 
who were sick of a feaver. Capt. Nichols and Silas Eddy here A*om Oxford. 
I was called to Mr. Chamberlain's, — his wife in travail. At about ten In 
evening John Comings came there after me to go to Bei^amin White's of 
Winthrop, but I could not be dismist. 

18. I was at Chamberlain's all day ; she was delivered [at] six o'clock, 
^afternoon, of a daughter. 

U. Jonathan watched with Alvln Weeks at Esqr. Howard's. 

15. Alvin Weeks departed this life in the night. 

16. I attended funeral of Mr. Weeks. Tarried at Esqr. [Howard's] This 
night took care of Polly and Suck [ey]. 

17. Came flrom the Fort and went to Chamberlain's, to see their babe. 
20. Mr. Oriah [Uriah] Clark's wife here. 

22. I was called to Mr. Leigh ton's, his wife being in travail. Left home at 
ten, forenoon; arrived there at two, afternoon. Found her safely delivered 
of a son, the operation by Solomon Leigh ton's wife. 

26. Sherebiah Town came for me to go to Mr. Dexter's at Sebestacook. I 
left home at four o'clock, P. M. *, arrived there a little before twelve. Found 
Mrs. Dexter very III with the mumps; fixed her a remedy and she mended 
soon. I tarried there and at son Town's till October the sixth ; then came 
home by water attended by Carl,ain Hale and Sherebiah Town ; they brought a 
barrel offish fh>m Mr. Str^t^^on's pounds. 

October 8. Daniel Robins has bruised his toe — it is palnfbl ; I put a poultis 
to it. 

September 9. JKra Hodges lived on the road to the Hook, south of Kennedy brook. 

../ 



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242 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1785. October 11. Called in great haste to Colo. Howard's, his wife and 
fiye children very sick ; Samuel bleeding. Gave them Great Bitters. Wheeler 
sick at Esqr. Howard's. 

13. Watcht at the Foit this night. 

14. I came f^om the fort at ten. Went back again before night. Took a 
sleep fore part of the night. Sit up after two in Mrs. Howard's chamber. 

16. I went to Colo. Howard's ; tarried all night, and watcht. Mrs. Howard 
had a severe fever fit. 

17. I tarried and helped move the sick, dress the blisters, &c. ; returned 
home at noon. Brother Moore and Thomas Smiley here. Mr. Ballard went 
up with them to view a mill-spot. 

19. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Hersey's farm to the Hook, afternoon. Wilbra 
Stone sent here for camphor; I sent him an ounce of tincture. 

21. Ephraim Town came here about day for me to go to Mr. Dexter's. We 
left here at 7 o'clock ; arrived at Dexter's at afternoon ; found his wife very 
ill. I removed the obstruction and delivered her safe of a fine daughter about 
the middle of the night. It stormed severely as I was on my journey. 

22. I came ftom Dexter's. It rained. I called to see Polly Dudley who is 
extremely low and senseless. Dined at Doctor Barton's. Got to Fort 
Western at dusk, but could not cross the river by reason of the ft'eshet. 
Tarried at Colo. Howard's ; very kindly entertained ; his family very sick yet. 

23. I came over the river safe. Found Dolly some more comfortable. 

24. Mrs. Woodward dined here, then crossed the crick [creek] to go to Mr. 
Weston's. Mr. Hopkins and Mr. Stanley came in order to trim the mill. 
It thundered and rained in the night. 

28. I left home about three o'clock, P. M. Went as far as Davis's store ; 
was called to Colo. Howard's to assist Mrs. Pollard and Bisby lay out the 
corpse of his wife, just now decibased. His children yet very sick. I returned , 
home a little after sunset. 

30. Sunday. I came home from the fort about noon. Attended worship, 
afternoon. Mr. Jesse Koofe slept here ; Samuel Bullen and Ephraim Cowen, 
also. 

31. I was called at 10 o'clock in the mom in haste to Captain Jobe 
Springer's wife in travail, who was safely delivered at 2 o'clock, soon after my 
arrival there of a daughter. Left them both comfortable. 

November 1. I was called to Mr. Weston's at 1 o'clock in moru. She being 
in labor; was delivered of a son at 7 in the morn. I returned home about one 
o'clock, afternoon. Polly Fletcher came to nurse Mrs. Weston. Mr. Ballard 
been with the court's committee on the roads from the river to Winthropand 
west and to the country road eastward, which they have laid out. 

7. Attended funeral of Peggy Margaret Howard who deceased yesterday. 

8. I was at home all day very unwell. I tried to take a sweat last night 
but could not; this night went into a warm bt:l. Drank some hot brandy 
tody [toddy] — sweat some. 

Octobar 28. John Davis traded in a Water street, nearlv '^Dposite the site of the 
small bnllding which stood on what is now present Hotel North. - . 



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MRS. BALLACD*8 DIARY. 243 

1785. November 10. Mrs. Edson here, 1 ounce salve for her husband's foot. 

11. I was called at 5 o'clock this morn to Henry Babcock's, his wife being 
in travail. Arrived there about day-light, — found her put to bed. The 
operation performed by Mrs. Smith. Mrs. Babcock, I found in severe pain, 
her complaints so great, and she very desirous I should inquire into the 
cause. I complyd, and found her greatly ingered by some mishap. Mrs. 
Smith does not allow that she was sensible of It; however her fix. Mrs. 
Babcock's distress was so severe we were appreheUvSive she was expiring; 
sent for Doctor Coleman. But Dr. Williams fortunately came in and prescribed 
remedies which afforded some relief. I left him there and returned home at 
10 P.M. 

12. I am at home. Doctor Williams called here on his return from Mr. 
Babcock's. Informs me that she is some more comfortable ; he has hopes she 
may recover. 

16. Mr. Ballard went to Cobese. I went to Mr. Suel's to visit his family ; 
they were sick. There were a gang went to Samuel Dutton's and took John 
Jones. Brought him to Pollard's ; tarried till morn, when they set out with 
him for Wlscasset. 

16. I heard that Captain- Savage and Hersey were so heavy they overset 
their canoe and fell into the river. 

17. It hath rained very much this day. The corn-mill ceased grinding till 
finished repairing. 

20. I was ciiUed to Wm. Cowen's wife at 1 o'clock in morn ; found her very 
unwell. 

21. At Cowen's still. She unwell yet. Jonas Clark's infant had a fit; they 
called me to see it. Mrs. Cowen called her women together this evening; • 
was safely delivered of a daughter about the middle of the night and is 
comfortable. Fee and medicines 10 shillings. 

22. I returned from Cowen's. Mr. Ballard went to Doctor Cony's this 
afternoon to meet the select gentlemen [selectmen]. 

24. Solomon Pollard went from here, went on board Captain Smith's 
[vessel] bound for the West Indies. 

25. I went to see Isaac Savage's youngest child, it being unwell. Mr. Saris 
drank tea here, and took a raft out this crick [creek] this evening. 

27. I did not attend divine service, but am going to visit Henry Babcock's 
wife who is sick. I find her some more comfortable. 

28. Came home from Mr. Babcock's, and went to Mr. Weston's. Mr. 
Hamlen here to settle. 

December 1. Mr. Crage's shop was consumed by Are. 

November 15. The enormity of the complished, and peace had been declared 

offense of Jones (in the esteem of his local t^vo years before. It was an ontrai^eons 

enemies) may be deduced from the fact that act to mob poor Jones under the circnm- 

the return of a refugee a second time to his stances howsoever slightly our sympathy 

former home and place of expulsion, sub- for him may be stirred, 

jectod him to the punishment of death Samuel Button was then living at the 

(Mass. Laws, 1778). The revolution, how- Hook. He subsequently removed to Bangor 

ever, at this time was gloriously ac- where he was living in 1814. 



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244 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1785. December 6. The coro-mill set to going. 

9. Hannah Coole here. Informs of the death of Jabez and Reuben Moore's 
children. They were buried yesterday. 

10. Mended my camblet gown. Mr. Ballard went to Wm. PuUin's. Brought 
home six fouls. 

12. Called to Ben. Brown's wife. She being in travail, and was delivered of 
a son soon after my arrival. 

13. I was called to see Dr. Colman. I watched. 

14. I came from the Fort about noon. Left Dr. Colman exceeding low 
indeed. 

15. Thanksgiving Day. I did not attend worship. Mr. Foster and wife, 
Mrs. Chamberlin. Theophilus Hamlen and Polly and Poll Savage, Hannah 
Woodward, and Eliphalet Bobbins supt here. 

16. I was at home all day. Mr. Ballard was surveying for Bei^amin Brown. 

17. A very rainy day. The freshet rose in the brook. Dutton's dam met 
with a breach which caused it to rise higher than usual. No great damage 
happened here. 

18. A fine pleasant day. Mr. Hazelet performed divine service. I attended 
all day. 

19. I have been at home this day. It is the anniversary of my marriage 
and thirty-one years since Mr. Ballard and I Joined in wedlock. 

20. Mr. Ballard [has] been on the road by Hersey's. 

21. Called to Mrs. Beaman, [she] being in travail — and was safely 
delivered of a daughter about midnight. 

24. Mr. Ballard returned ft:om surveying at Vassalborough (by desire of 
Esqr. Lovejoy). 

29. Mr. Hallowell mended puter here for which he received 8 pecks of com. 
Old Mr. Springer and wife here. Elizabeth Cosson, also. George Bolton has 
our horse, — is gone to wedding of Daniel Savage, Junior, and Betsy Peirce. 
Shubal Hinkley and widdo Robison [Robinson] are to be Joined in wedlock 
this day. 

80. Mr. French informed me of the death of Mrs. Stuart, who deceased this 
mom. Mr. Hinkley and lady went past here on their way home. 

81. We were informed of the fUneral of Mrs. Stuart at the Hook. Mr. 
Williams dined here. Says his wife is unwell. Children, I have been called 
to the birth of this year past, 28, — seventeen of them were daughters. I 
have lost 42 nights' sleep this year past. 

1786. 

January 1. Sunday. A clear but very cold day. My fkmlly all attended 
divine service, except Ephraim and myself. 

2. Edm'n Allen and wife here. The mill stopt by reason of the cold. I 
hear Mrs. Faught is deceased. 

December 17. Dutton's dam was at the Samuel Cummings, Jr., who thereafter 

place which afterwards became known as operated the mill for many yean. 

Cammings' (and later saccessively as December 18. See Bibliography of Hal- 

Ladd's and Coombs* mill.) Samuel Datton lowell, for reference to Rev. William 

sold the property on January 8, 1789, to Hazlitt. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 245 

1786. January 8. Mr. Bullin and Rachel Faught came here at 9 o*clock, 
going to attend ftineral of Mrs. Faaght. I called to see Mrs. North. She is 
very sick. Was enformed there of the death of Judge Bowman of Fownalboro. 
It is a tedious storm. 

4. Called by James Moore to go to John Blake's wife [she] being in travail. 
I rode our horse there. Put her nafe to bed with a son. It snowed all night. 

5. I came home accompanied by Mr. Moore. Mr. Blake paid me eight 
shillings. 

6. Am called to go to Mr. Chamberlin's to see his babe. 

7. Our men brought hay ft'om the meddow. Dolly fell down chamber and 
hurt her head. 

9. Mr. Mags [Meigs] came after me to go to Mrs. Hatch. We left [with] 
our horse at 4 o'clock, afternoon. Arrived there at 8 in evening. 

10. At Hatch's. Death Chamberlin child. 

22. Mrs. Hatch called us up about daybreak. The women were called in and 
she was safely delivered of a daughter, about sunset. 

23. It rained. I left Mr. Hatche's at daybreak, attended by Mr. Williams to 
the county road ; Arom Jonston's, by Augustus Ballard. 

25. Mr. Savage shod one pair oxen. Dolly went to Foster's, had her shoes 
mended. 

80. I was called to John Babcock's wife, [she] being in travail. She was 
delivered of a daughter at 5 o*clock in the evening. A south wind and smart 
rain. 

February 1. I was called to Mr. Weston's to cutt their infant's tongue. 

8. Rev. Mr. Noble came to town yesterday. 

6. Mr. Ballard [has] gone to lay out road ft-om the Hook towards Winthrop. 
I was called to Joseph Williams at the Hook,— his wife in travail. 

7. Mrs. Williams safely delivered of a daughter at 5, morn. The child 
much spent, but soon revived. Williams child expired about midnight, I hear. 

8. Heard that Mrs. Goodwin was delivered of a son that weighed 8 lbs. 

9. The men helped two horses out of the river. Went to Mr. Barker's, 
Town's and Shaw's. We spent evening at Mr. Dutton's very agreeable. Doct. 
Cony and Lady there. We got home at 12 o'clock. 

13. I was called to Robert Fletcher's at half after one this mom, his wife 
being unwell. 

16. At Mr. Fletcher's yet. 

16. I was called to Charles Clark's from Mr. Fletcher's. Put Mrs. Clark to 
bed with a daughter about 3 o'clock, afternoon. Returned at sunset to Mr. 
Fletcher's. 

17. At Mr. Edward Savage's, to see his wife; find her very weak and low. 

January 3. (1) At Sidney on the river February 9. (1) William Barker (1734- 

road, nearly opposite Brown's (or 5-mile) 1822), Sherebiah Town, and Benjamin 

island. (2) This entry was based on a false Shaw (1752-1815), pioneer settlers at 

report. Judge Bowman died September ancient Pittston (Gardiner). (2) Samnel 

4, 1804. Button at the Hook. 

January 10. David Hatch, a settler here February 13. Robert Fletcher, a settler 

in 1776. here in 1780. See Fletcher family. 



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246 • HiirroBT of augusta. 

IT^fv. TehruArj H. Mn. Fletcher called her women azain this mom, and 
wa.4 !i:iff:\j delivered of a <laosrhter, at 5 oxl'^k thU ni«>iii. Mrs. McXi^bt 
came there and tarried till morniDg, — said her hatband had tomed her ont-a- 

dOf-'r^. 

y.K Snndaj, I attended worship. Rer. Mr. Xoble performed before noon, 
and Ber. Hazel it t, afternoon. 

2i. When Jonathan got op this mom be foond a chair in the Are part homt, 
a pair of ba^ketji, and a pair of ho:$e op against a bais coat apron; Hannah's 
alm^^t all coaname^i. 

2(p. I waa called bj Ephraim Stevens of Winthrop about sonset, to his wife 
in travail. Had two fall^ from the hor»e I roiJe, bat received no hnrt. Arrived 
there aboat 8 o'clock. Mrs. Stevens was safelj delivered of a fine son, — her 
third child. 

27, I retamed home in a sleigh. Mrs. Williams here. She fainted and fell 
on the floor. I was enformed that Mr. Smith was ?one awaj, and *tis feared 
de^irjH to deprive him«>elf of life on account of Poll j fiUunlen*s refdsing towed 
with him. 

March 1. Thin day obnerved as a day of fast and prayer, on account of 
calling one to settle in the minLstry. Rev*d 3ir. Emerson performed in the 
forenfHm ezerci?«e, and Mr. Moore [in] the afternoon. Smith and Polly Hamlen 
are in all conversation at present. 

2. Mr. Densmore came for a cyrmp I made for his wife. 

5. Gf:orge Bolton enformed he had heard Smith had hanged himself. 

6. The annual [town] meeting. Mr. Hazlit and Xoble both dismist. 

9. Mr. Ballard gone to Mr. Soel's with the other select gentlemen to settle 
with the Rcv'd Mr. Xoble for preaching in this town. 

1 1. Mr. Weston here to settle with Mr. Ballard ; John Church, also ; settling 
about his timber which was sawed at our mill. 

12. Sunday. Did not attend divine services, but my family did. Hannah 
Woodman called here on her return home ; she had slipt down and undied her 
clothes very much. 

14. I hear that Mr. Smith has retamed. 

16. Mr. Ballard gone to Mr. Pollard's to meet the meeting-house committee, 
and settle with Asa Emerson. 

18. I combed 6 1-2 lbs. of flax. The ice moved in the river, Jam*d as low as 
Mr. Brooks. 

19. Sunday. The ice on the move. A breach discovered in the dam this 
mora. 

20. We were enformed of the death of Susanna Savage, who deceast last 
night. 

21. The river open and people crost by water at Fort Western. The corpse 
of 8 una Savage Interred at three o'clock and 45 m., P. M. It is now 6 in 
evening. I Just received news of the death of Nathan Runels who deceased 
this morn. 

February 18. David McKnight was a missed from further ministerial service 
settler here in 1783. here by vote of town meeting. 

March 6. Clergymen who were dis- 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 247 

1786. March 22. Mr. Whiting of Winthrop is dangerously sick. Mr. Ballard 
mending the dam. Jonathan ont to look up loggs ; came home very unwell. 
I poltist his hand and gave him some herb tea. A very remarkable appear- 
ance in the hemisphere of light together with streams of read [red]. 

23. Mr. Ballard at work at the saw-mill. Jonathan Is much better. 

25. Mr. Johnston came here. Mr. Biges [Bridge] also. Our saw-mill began 
to go this day. 

27. The dam broke this mom. Mr. Ballard and Brooks had some uncanyness. 
The Northern light appears this evening. 

28. I was called to Eliab Shaw's at half past five o'clock, F. M. His wife in 
travail. She was safely delivered between six and seven of a son— her fourth 
child. 

29. I came home ft-om Mr. Shaw's at 10 P. M. Mr. Cowen and others brought 
logs to the mill. 

30. Mr. Ballard went to attend town meeting. Mr. Suall sent a man to 
attend me to his house to hear Mr. Potter speak. 

31. Mr. Ballard left home for Sebestakuk. Mrs. Farley here — says her 
family are in suffering circumstances. 

April 3. Mr. Ballard returned ft-om Sebestacuk. Informs that son Town's 
family are well except his daughter Patty. Mrs. Straten put to bed last week. 
A town meeting in town this day. 

4. Mr. Kilbreth came here — is helping pick mill. 

5. Mr. Ballard been out to purchase logs. 

6. Fast day. Mrs. Weston here. Doc't Coney also, and dined. We had 
a leg of pork. 

8. Susanna Cowln brought home 13 yards of cloth which she wove for me. 

15. We finished brewing a barrel and half of beer. Friend Gardner sleeps 
here. Our young men brought 57 logs to the saw mill. Mr. Ballard fell off 
the raft into the river. Mr. Suell called me to see his wife, she being in travail. 
Mrs. Howard, McMaster, Voce and Bellchlr [Belcher] were assistants. 

16. Sunday. Mrs. Suell safely delivered at 3 o'clock this morn of a son. I 
left her comfortable and returned home at 10 o'clock. Did not attend divine 
service. Mr. Foster, a young gentleman ft'om Stafford, in the State of Con- 
necticut, performed. 

17. Mr. Ballard been to Mr. Gardner's to put in his crank. Mrs. Farley here 
for relief. There was a thief whipped at the post for stealing clothes from 
Mr. Ebenezer Farwell. 

March 30. Rev. James Potter, who snb- foandation for many of the baptist churches 

seqaently became noted as a baptist evan- in Maine. See note to entry for August 

gelist. He first nnitad with the Congrega- 28, 1791. 

tional church at Harpswell, which act gave April 16. This appears to have been the 

him standing with Captain Sewall ; he first public appearance in the town of Rev. 

joined the baptists in 1782, was ordained Isaac Foster, the earliest settled minister 

an evangelist in 1785, and officiated as pas- here. He was soon invited to settle here as 

tor at Harpswell, 1785-1788, and at Bow- the town's minister, and was ordained on 

doin, 1788-1811. Besides these stated the 11th of the following October, 

labors, he traveled mnch in the new settle- April 17. A judicial flogging at the 

ments, and was instrumental in laying the whipping-post near the jail. 



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248 mSTORT OF augusta. 

1786. April 18. I was called to Mr. Gilman's at the hook to see his wife 
in travail. I pnt her safe to bed at five, afternoon, with a fine daughter — her 
ninth child. 

20. Mr. Ballard at Dr. Coney's this evening. Daniel went to the hook. 
Brought home 6 gallons rhum, 2 lbs. coffee, 5 lbs. sugar and some tobacco and 
1 1-4 bush, of salt troux Joseph Williams for me for assisting his wife in travail 
with her last child. 

22. Esq. Lovejoy dined here. Uriah Clark and his son also. I lent Dr. 
Coney six penny worth and a half of rhubarb. 

24. Mr. Blanchard and Noah Woodward came to work here. 

25. The Spanldlngs brought logs. We had nine men dined besides our own 
family. 

26. I was called to Winthrop to Bill Richard's wife. She being in travail. 

27. I put Mrs. Richards safe to bed with a fine daughter at about four this 
morning. Left them a little after break of day. Called to see Mrs. Barnard 
who is unwell, and Woodward Allen's wife who is very low indeed. Called at 
Sam'l Cummings and rode his horse and saddle as far as Foster's. Walked 
firom there. 

28. Mr. Ballard came home flrom viewing land belonging to Mr. Pitt's heirs. 
The mills have been stopped from going by the Areshet. Capt. Grant dined 
here. 

29. Rhuben Moore sleeps here. Informs of the death of an infant of Collins 
Moore's — a twin of a month old. Lightning in the north this evening. 

80. Sunday. Rev. Mr. Foster preached here. Mrs. Snell sent for salve. I 
sent her one half an ounce. 

May 1. Doc. Coney chosen to represent the town in the General Court. Mr. 
Bullin Grand Juryman. The Northern lights appear this evening. 

8. I was called at 15 minutes after 12 o'clock to Mrs. Hovey, she being 
in travail, and was safe delivered at 8 this mom of a daughter. I went to 
see Mrs. Suell, afternoon, found her able to do her household work. 

4. I was called to the hook to Mrs. Norris, she being in travail. Put her 
safe to bed with a son at one o'clock afternoon. Returned home at four. 

5. I was called at 6 o'clock to Mrs. Foster in travail, who was safely de- 
livered of a fine son at 8 3-4 o'clock, the evening. I returned at two. Left 
Mrs. Cowin with her. 

7. Mr. Hamlen here directly ft-om the West, who brought letters ft-om 
brother Collins and one f^om Josiah Kingsbury. We dined on a fine leg of 
corned pork stufll with green herbs from our garden. 

8. This town met and gave the Rev. Mr. Foster a call to settle here. Mr. 
Ballard went to Mr. William Gardiner's for money due, but got none. 

April 18. Eliphalet Gilman was a settler nection with an attempt in 1811 to form a 

in 1785. new town by the name of Naples (oorre- 

April 22. Uriah Clark was a settler on sponding to the present town of Man- 

the river lot, east side, near the Vassal boro Chester) . 

line. May 3. Ebenezer Hovey, a settler pre- 

April 26. William Richards appears vious to 1771. 
again in the coarse of this history, in con- 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 249 

1786. May 11. I was called at 4 o'clock to Brian Fletcher's, his wife being 
unwell, bnt got better. Old Mrs. Fletcher and I went to Roberts*, afternoon ; 
I was called flrom there in haste to James Moore's, [his] wife being in travail. 
She was safe delivered at 10 evening. 

12. Mr. Ballard at Doct. Coney's, making rates yesterday and this day. 
Ellph'l't unwell. The mill lies still this night. 

18. Sherebiah Town killed a veal for us. Lent a side to Colo. North, weight 
28 3-4 lbs. Eliphalet is better,— tending mill this evening. 

15. I was called at 11 o'clock to Savage Bolton's — the wife being in travail. 
She was safely delivered at 3 afternoon of a tine son. His oxen attached and 
drove away about seven. Mr. Ballard been at Doctor Coney's making rates. 

17. Old Mr. Smyles here. Mr. William Gardner also. 

18. We brewed a barrel and a half of beer. Mr. Crage's shop raised. Wil- 
liam Gardner here. 

21. Sunday. Jonathan, Co wen and Hannah and Dolly went to Esq. Petin- 
gel's to meeting. 

22. Mr. Blanchard returned flrom Yarmouth. Mr. Savage came flrom Win- 
throp — informs of the death of the widow Allln, daughter to Mr. Hopkins. 

24. Mr. Ballard went to brother Moore's — heard that Doctor Barton has 
removed to Winslow. Our mare returned. Mr. Toby ftrom Sandage [Sand- 
wich] here. 

26. Mr. Ballard went to the hook with a raft of boards— 8000 feet,— to put 
on board Mr. Tobey's vessel, on ft'ait to Boston. 

27. Daniel Bobbins unwell. I made him some catnip tea. Mr. Blackman 
and Asa Mason were overset a crossing the river — lost corn and other articles, 
but were both saved from drowning. 

28. I have been at home till 11 evening, when called out of bed to Mr. 
Pattin's. Went on foot to Brook's, then by water. 

29. I put Mrs. Fattin to bed with a daughter at 4 in morn. Came by water 
as far as Davis' store, then walked home, arrived at one o'clock, morn. 

30. Mr. Ballard paid Blanchard all that was due for his service here and 
dismissed him. He breakfasted here, then went to the mill and began a quarrel 
with Jona. and made such an outcry as gave myself and family great surprise. 
I sent for Mr. Ballard home from Savage's. Mr. Savage and Streeter came 
with him. Mrs. Woodward called going home flrom the hook. 

81. Election at Boston. 

June 1. We brewed a barrel and a half of beer. I planted 2 ears of com 
which Mrs. Hatch made a present of to Ephraim. 

2. Called this mom at 8 o'clock to Isaac Cowen's to see his wife, arrived 
thereat 1 P. M., found her safe delivered of a daughter— born between six 
and seven o'clock. Left there at 3, returned home at 7 very much fatigued — 
had two falls Arom my horse which lamed me some. 

8. Very hot. Old Mrs. Cowen here and dined here — husband carried to 
Jail for debt. Mr. Ballard gone to Cobsee and Town meeting. Wm. Kenady 
after me to see his wife. I was lame and did not go. 

May 17. David Smiley lived on the river road in the present town of Sidney. See 
note to entry for Jane 13, 1787. 



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250 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1786. June 4. I was called at eight this morning to Brian Fletcher — his 
wife in travail and was safe delivered of a daughter between ten and eleven. 
Beriah Ingerham's wife was delivered of a daughter 30th of May, [assisted] 
by old Mrs. Fletcher. 

5. Mrs. Ballard was at Capt. Suell's. I went up the crick [creek] to seek 
the calf — did not find it. Cut wood for fire to wash. 

9. I spun shoe thread. Mr. Ballard at Pownalboro Court. 

10. I was called at four o'clock to George Bolton's wife in travail. Put her 
safe to bed with a fine son at 11 o'clock. Mr. Ballard came from court. 

12. Sunday. A clear morn. Mr. Brown went in hast, after Doctor Colman 
for his eldest son being sick. I went fk'om home at 12 o'clock to see him, find 
him very ill. Was informed that Mr. Hathaway [at Winslow] who was 
drowned last week, was taken up and is to be interred this day. 

18. I hoed the beans and cucumbers in the yard by the brook and spun some 
shoe thread. 

15. Mr. Bonny brought fi*om Boston, barrel pork ; 1 do. of rum, 10 lb. 
chocolat. 

18. I was called at eight o'clock this morn to Mr. Gordin's, his wife in 
travail, found her put to bed by old Mrs. Fletcher with a daughter. 

19. Uriah Clark and wife and son and Mrs. Williams drank tea here, Daniel 
Bobbins also. Brother Moore sent for his nails and some rum. 

20. David Smiley here, informs that sister Barton was delivered of a son 
last Sunday — her eleventh child and fifth son. Briant Fletcher had his arm 
broke by the fall of a tree. 

22. Mr. Ballard went to the N. W. part of the town to take valuation. I 
went, afternoon, to Mr. Weston's, Mr. Pollard's and Col. North's. 

24. Mr. Ballard at work on the road up the hill — near our house. Mr. 
Halloway mended puter for me. 

25. Sunday. BenJ. Brown called here going to attend worship at Wlnthrop. 
Mr. Williams here. I applied a plaster of camphor to his ankle. I have read 
In Mr. Marshall's gospel. Mystery of Sanctification. 

26. This is seventeen years since the death of my daughter Triphena, who 
deceast aged 4 years and three months. 

27. Mr. BuUin here, informs that Ebn. Church wife was delivered of a son 
and daughter last week. Sherebiah Town sleeps here, informs that John 
Emery of Sebastacook was very much hurt in a saw mill. His life not expected. 

28. Mr. Ballard and Cowen worked on the road south of here. 

29. Son Town and Jonathan went to Cobese — returned this afternoon. 
Brought Betsy up. Informs that a young man had fell into the stream and 
was almost drowned but revived. We hear that Emery's leg is like to gangren. 
Brother Town's wife was delivered the 27 inst. of a daughter and is very ill — 
in danger of a fever. I hear also that the Widow Fitch has had a son and a 
young woman at Swetland's, Bets Tarr by name, adopted [it]. 

July 1. Mr. Ballard, Son Town, Jono. and Ephraini Cowen gone to assist 
Brother Moore raise his house. 

June 24. A traveling tinker. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 251 

1786. Jaly 2. Capt. Nichols here directly from Oxford — informs our 
friends are well. His daughter Campbell has had her 7th son. 

5. The anniversary of the death of my daughter Martha who deceased in 
1769, aged 8 years, and 2 months, and 28 days. 

6. I was called at 10 o'clock this morning to neighbor Williams' wife in 
travail. She was about ten in the evening safely delivered of a fine daughter 
— weighed 9 lbs. 

7. Col. North is returned from Boston. 

8 I hear that Solomon Brewers* wife deceased last Wednesday in travail — 
has left a poor family. 

10. A smokey thick air and hot. Mr. Ballard and Cowen went to see a 
meeting-house raised at Winthrop. The raising performed with safety. 

11. Dr. Coney returned from Boston. Mr. Ballard gone to court on the 
Grand Jury. 

15. Capt. Pinkham here —his leg sore. I dressed it. 

17. Mr. Ballard and Cowen to carry a raft of boards to Capt. Huskins' 
vessel. Jonathan gone on board bound for Boston. 

20. Briant Fletcher dined here. The widow Howard, Mrs. Farwell, Mrs. 
Betsy and Polly Howard here, afternoon. 

23. I attended divine service afternoon. Mr. Foster delivered a discourse 
from Matt. 25, 41 verse. Isaac Cowen informed of the death of Susanah Sautle 
who deceased last week. Doctor Cony returned the rhubarb which he bor- 
rowed of me and 1 penny weight and 20 grains overplus. 

26. Rev. Mr. Foster dined here. 

27. I carded cotton and cut alders and made sort of a fence part round the 
yard by the mill pond, then was called to Eiiab Shaw's to see his children, they 
being sick with the canker rash. 

28. I was informed that Mr. CoUer of Winslow has buried two daughters — 
all they had. 

80. Sunday. I attended Divine service. Rev. Mr. Moore performed. Mr. 
Bullin's youngest daughter fainted and was carried out of the house to Mr. 
Pollard's — then recovered her sences just as services was ended. 

August 1. Mrs. Dutton delivered of a daughter, I hear. 

6. Sunday. I attended worship all day. £ph. Lovejoy, David Smlly and 
John Bragg called after meeting and eat with us. This is my daughter 
Hannah's birthday. Aged 17 years. Jonathan returned from Boston. 

11. I went to Mr. Porter's. Bought 2 oz. of indigo, 2 green colored bowleg, 
1 tunnel, 1 dipper, 1 pepper box, 2 tumblers and 8 yards tape. Paid with an 
order from Isaac Cowen. 

12. The men repaired the com mill. Cyrus bought 15 lbs. of butter of 
Abram Page. 

July 10. The first meeting.hoaBe erected July 20. Margaret Lithgow, widow of 

on the soil of the ancient township of Win- Lieutenant Samuel Howard (1700-1784). 

throp. It was located where has grown July 30. Rev. Thomas Moore, minister 

the present village of Winthrop. The of the town of Pownalboro from 1773 till 

bolldlng was 40 by 50 feet sills, and was 1791, when he was succeeded by Rev. Alden 

completed in 1794. Bradford. 



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252 HI8TOBY OP AUGUSTA. 

1786. Angast 14. I was called to see Capt. Savage's wife who is sick of a 
fever. I watched with her this night. 

15. Taesday. Mr. Ballard gone on the estate of Pitts. I hear that Rhaben 
Moore's eldest son deceased last Sabbath day. 

18. Mr. Ballard came home — he is informed of the death of Doctor Gardner. 

19. Mr. Ballard is anwell — has taken some soap pills. 

24. Mrs. Bisbee dined here. I went to Fort Weston with her. We called 
on the neighbors that side of the river. 

28. David Fletcher's wife was delivered of a son the 22 inst. Mrs. North 
and the two Mrs. Cox here. Doctor Coney here. 

29. I was called to Moses White's, his wife in travail. I went by water to 
Jackson's landing, then walked, arrived at one o'clock. She was safely delivered 
of a daughter about five. I rode to the fort, crost the river, arrived at home 
at eight, the evening. 

81. I was called to Ben. White's at half after 10, his wife in travail. 

Sept. 1. Put Mrs. White safe to bed with a daughter at 3 o'clock, afternoon. 
We are informed that James Runnels who lives up the river struck one Cymbol 
[Kimball] with an axe on his head ; his life is not expected. 

2. Bei\]amin White brought me a pair of flat irons for 6 shill. which is my 
fee, 2s. remaining due for remedies. 

4. Mr. Ballard been to the hook on business for Mr. Vann l^anghan]. 

18. I was called to see Mrs. Foster, find her very unwell. I bathed her 
throat, doctored her blisters and did for her as fkr as I could. Dolly being 
nnwell I returned home, bathed her throat and am at home still. Mr. Ballard 
gone to the hook in Mr. Vaun's business. 

14. Mr. Ballard gone to the hook again. Jono. unwell. Sleeps on a bed by 
the fire. Dolly unwell also. 

15. Mr. Ballard at Dr. Coney's, forenoon, making plan afternoon. 

16. Mr. Ballard at the hook. Jono. gone to Sandy river. Sam'l Stephens 
and his wife of Winthrop to mill. Mr. Wiman informs that Mr. Streeter, a 
preacher, is lately departed this life. Left a large family. 

17. I was called to see Asa Mason, his foot wounded. I dressed it and 
returned. 

20. Wednesday. Mr. Ballard been to the hook, carried the plans to Mr. 
Yaun, received his pay. Jono returned A*om Sandy river, informs that Mrs. 
Eaton's father deceased last week and was Interred on Sunday last. 

23. I was called early this morn to see Lidia Savage who was very ill, gave 
lier some urin and honey and some liquric and put a plaster to her stomach. 
Went up afternoon, find her relieved. 

26. Mr. Ballard went to his land up river. I made a syrup for Mrs. Weston. 

August 18. Dr. Sylvester Gardiner died citizen, Mr. Benjamin White, who departed 

at Newport, R. I., August 8, 1786, in the this life July 4, 1804, in the 77th year of his 

80th year of his age. age. Man dieth and wasteth away ; yea, 

September 2. In the Hallowell cemetery man giveth up the ghost, and where is he ?'* 

there are memorial slabs bearing the in- (2) '* In memory of Mrs. Elizabeth White , 

Bcriptions: (1) "This stone is erected to relict of Mr. Benjamin White, who died 

the memory of that worthy and good February 11, 1808, aged 79 years.** 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 



253 



1786. Sept. 27. I hear that Moses White's infant departed this life the 25th. 

28. Mr. Patten brought me a pair of tarned pumps made by Mr. Calu. 

29. Was called by Mr. Pollard at 6 P. M. to Mrs. Hodges, she in travail and 
was safe delivered of a fine son about 11. I then went in haste to Mrs. Brown 
in travail, arrived there at midnight. 

80. Mrs. Brown called her women and was safe delivered at noon of a son 
which weighed 11 1-4 lbs. 

October 1. I was called at 3 this mom, to Daniel Savage's wife in 
travail. She was safe delivered at two, afternoon, of a son. I left her and child 
cleverly, and arrived at home about six. 

7. The saw mill has gone some this day. I was called to Mr. Porter's wife 
at half after seven in evening, she being in travail. Put her safe to bed with 
a son at half after nine o'clock. 

8. Sunday. Attended divine service, afternoon, was agreeably entertained 
with a discourse delivered by Rev. John Foster of Paxton. 

10. Bought a black handkerchief of a Dutchman, a case of knives and forks 
of Mr. Brooks. 

11. The Rev. Isaac Foster was ordained in this town. My family all at- 
tended except myself and Ephraim. Mr. Fuller, Doct. Warren and Brother 
Town supt here. 

12. Sherebiah Town and young Mr. Howard breakfasted. 

13. Eliab Shaw worked for us. Mr. Brown dined here. Mr. Davis came 
here, he has the shingles. We bled a cat and applied the blood which gave 
him relief. Doct. Lee here. 

14. Hear that Jonathan at Capt. Page's was informed that Mr. Shepherd 
departed this life this mom. It is 9 years this day since we arrived at John 
Jones' landing at the farm. 

15. Sunday. Davis here. Doct. Coney came to see him after meeting, ad- 
vised him to go to the salt water. It's nine years this morn since we went in 
at Mr. Jones' to live. Silas Lee is at Mr. Brook's. 



October 8. Rev. John Foster was a 
brother of Rev. Isaac Foster. 

October 11. Jonathan Fuller, Junior, 
(1723-1796), an ex-soldier of the revola- 
tion, who came to the Kennebec from New- 
ton, Mass., and settled at Winslow, where 
he married Lydia Webb; they had twelve 
children, some of whose descendants are 
stUl living in Winslow. . . "I re- 
member that event. I saw the assembled 
multitude, in the meeting-house and 
on the contiguous grounds. It was 
the spectacle which interested me. I have 
no recollection of the services. These fol- 
lowed the feasting and hilarity at that time 
usual on such occasions. Pollard's house 
resounded with music and dancing, kept 
up by relays of participants, quite beyond 
the power of endurance of a single set." . . 
Nathan Weston's Oration, July 4, 1864, 



October 12. Sherebiah Town was a 
brother of Bphraim Town, the son-in-law 
of the Diarist. Sherebiah was a miller. 

October 13. Doctor John Lee, who m. 
Sally Howard, dan. of Lieutenant Samuel 
and Margaret (lithgow) Howard. John 
Lee was a brother of Silas Lee, lawyer, and 
of the wife of John Jones. 

October 14. Jones' landing received its 
name from John Jones, the tory, who was 
tenant for a while on the Benjamin Hallo- 
well lot, number two, east side (now Chel- 
sea) partly opposite what is known as 
Brown's island. 

October 15. William Brooks at this time 
traded in a small building on the point 
formed by the south shore of Jones' (now 
Bond's) brook and the river. 



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254 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1786. October 16. Mr. Ballard is taking valaatlon. The girls went from 
home at 12 o'clock to take leave of Polly Hamlen, she being bound for Oxford. 
I wrote letters to Deacon Davis, to Brother Collins and to sister Waters which 
I sent by them for to be carried by Mr. Hamlen. 

17. BenJ. Brown and Timothy Woodward here to work. 

19. I was called to see Mrs. Bent at half after 10 this evening. Went by 
water* arrived at 12 o'clock, foand her very unwell. 

22. Nabby Jackson here for some maiden hair for Mrs. Bent, who remains 
poorly. 

23. I made a syrup for Mrs. Weston and for Mrs. Porter and some oila- 
mulge and went to see^Mrs. Porter. .'\.sa Mason here to have his foot doctored. 
Mr. Ballard and others workt on the road by the little brook south of this. 

24. Rebecca Tounsen, a son born. 

25. We are informed that Mr. Wimon is come fkrom Boston and brought his 
sister. 

27. Benj. Brown and Timmie Woodward workt here. 

28. Mr. Ballard at Mr. Pollard's on an arbitration between Mr. Witham and 
Baker of Sandy river. 

29. Sunday. A clear pleasant day. I attended meeting. The Sacrament 
administered. Mrs. Weston's son baptized by the name of Samuel. Mr. 
Ballard and I went to visit the Rev. Mr. Foster this evening. 

30. Mr. Ballard and Jonathan surveying for Mr. Vaughn. 

Nov. 1. Mr. Ballard, Dicky and Ephraim went to finish surveying Mr. 
Vaughn's lot. 

3. Mr. Ballard workt about the dam and bridge. 

4. I made an undercoat of the blanket the swine tore and bound a quilt. 

5. I attended worship. I was called about sunset to Capt. Springer's wife 
in travail. She was safe delivered of a daughter at 10 o'clock this evening. 

6. Was called at 2 P. M. to Mr. Woodward's to see Mr. Blackman who is 
unwell. Came home at six. 

7. Mrs. North here forenoon. I went as far as the little brook with her. 
Mr. Ballard workt at meeting house hill on the road. 

12. Sunday. I hear Mrs. Weston left Boston yesterday and was at meeting 
here this afternoon. Mr. Harris' son Obediah deceased yesterday. 

13. I was called to see Isaac Harden's wife in travail, she was safe delivered 
at 3 o'clock, P. M. of a son. The remains of Obediah Harris were interred 
this afternoon. 

14. Called to see Mrs. Weston, she being very unwell. I applied a blister, 

October 23. "The little brook" which fallen trees, or there may have been stepping 

then flowed out of the virgin forest westerly stones which enabled foot travelers with 

from the present gas hoase hill, has now care and exertion to cross it dry shod. The 

entirely disappeared. It crossed the site of stream is represented in Chandler's plan of 

Bond street about midway between the the village in 1838, as Severance brook, 

present Water and State streets, and en- Iti water was later utilized for many years 

tered the larger brook several rods easterly by the Augusta and Hallowell Gas Light 

from th3 site of the present Bond house. Company in supplying the gasometer. 

It was unbridged save perhaps by some November 7. Later known as Jail hill. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 255 

bathed her feet, pat on a back plaster, returned home at evening, left her a 
little easier. 

1786. Nov. 16, Jotham Suall [Sewall] built a stove in the mill. 

16. Mr. Woodward brought us a swine that weighed 70 lbs. His wife 
carried Jennie Weston home with her this evening. 

19. Sunday. Mr. Ballard attended worship at Deacon Emerson's, crost 
the river on the Ice. 

22. Mr. Ballard gone to survey for Mr. Senter. 

23. I saw a horse fall into the river three times by the fort wharf. The 
4th attempt they got him over the river. A snow fell this night. 

26. Sunday. A bitter cold morn. I was called to see Mrs. Blackman In 
travail. Left home at sunset, got there after much fatigue, iound her put safe 
to bed by Mrs. Ellis. Tarried all night. 

27. I went to Capt. SualVs and Thomas SualPs and Rev. Mr. Foster's. 
Spent evening at Esqr. Howard's. Mr. Ballard came to accompany me home. 

28. Mr. George Brown here, has trose both his ears. I put some salve on 
them. Welch's wife delivered of a daughter the 17th Inst. Mrs. Fletcher 
operated. 

30. Patty Savage is married to Mr. Gordin of Winthrop this day. 
Dec. 1. Mr. Ballard went to hear Suell's trial for abusing Mr. BuUin on the 
highway. He is laid under bonds. 

2. Mrs. Foster dined here. I went to Mrs. Weston's. She and I made a 
settlement of some trading we have had which was not bookl and there is 2s. 
due to me. 

3. Sunday. I attended divine service. Rev. Mr. Foster unable to per- 
form. Deacon Emerson officiated in his room. 

4. Mr. Ballard went to Rev. Mr. Foster's, finds him mending. 
6. Densmore brought Mr. Ballard's coat home. 

8. We are informed Capt. Howard is got safe into the river. 

10. Sunday. Mr. Ballard went to the meeting house. Mr. Foster came, 
but no other person, so there was no preaching. 

12. It snows now, it is 11 in evening. Excessive cold till evening. I 
finished knitting Mr. Ballard's leggings and mended Dickey's stockings and 
Ephriam's trousers. Hannah did housework, the other girls turning cotton 
sheets and other mending. 

14. Thanksgiving day. I went to meeting and was called to Col. Howard's 
to assist Mrs. Pollard lay out his son James. 

15. James Howard interred this afternoon. 

16. Mr. Ballard gone to the meadow after hay. Ephraim been over the 
pond for wood. My husband got a load of hay, came home much fatigued, 
brused his shins with the crust so that they blistered. 

17. Sunday. Geo. Brown here this evening, informs they are very sick at 
Col. Howard's. It is a sickly time in this town. .Jack Howard deceast. 

18. We are informed of Jacky Howard's death. I went to attend funeral, 
but by reason of Esq. Howard being taken very ill I was called in there and 
tarried with them till about 9 o'clock when Cyrus came there, informed that 
Ephraim was in a fit. I returned home in great haste led by Cyrus and York. 
Found my little son revived. Left the Esq. more comfortable, Betsy also. 



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256 HISTORY OF AUOUSTA. 

1786. December 19. Ephraim is well as usual. This Is the anniversary of 
my marriage, 82 years since. 

25. Mr. Ballard carried a load of wood to Mr. Pollard's old house for Rev. 
Mr. Foster. I made me four night caps. 

27. Mr. Ballard carried a load of wood to Rer. Mr. Foster. He removed 
fk'om Mr. Sewall's this day. 

28. Was called to Mr. Jackson's to Mrs. Bent in travail. Her child bom 
before I arrived. I put her safe to bed. Set with her this night. 

80. Mr. Ballard gone to cut wood for Mr. Foster. I was called to Capt. 
Suairs wife in travail, got there at 7 o'clock, evening. 

81. Sunday. Mrs. Suall delivered at 11 this morning of a son and is 
cleverly. Samuel Badcock's wife to bed with a son the 29th. Mrs. Fletcher 
operated. 

1787. 

1787. January 4. Mrs. Porter and Williams here; their husbands came to 
wait on them home. Mr. Weston and wife here forenoon. Mr. Ballard went 
to Mr. Pollard's to hear a coart. 

11. Mr. Ballard went to hear court. Ephraim Stephens here, had 2oz. 
salve, paid Is. 

12. I was called to Mr. Savage to see his child that were sick. Doct. Coney 
there. 

18. We began to make soap. Rev'd Mr. Foster here, going to attend 
ftineral of Nathaniel Runel's child. Desired me to go and see his lady and 
child who were unwell. I went. 

24. I went to see Mr. Savage's child, tarried all night. Mr. Ballard came 
f^om Doct. Coney's. Carried me upon a sled. 

25. I came home on the sled. Mr. Ballard is gone to see Thomas Sewall to 
converse with him concerning ill he is accused of spreading, of the Rev. Mr 
Foster. He returned without any satisfkction. 

26. I was called to Nathan Swettland's wife at 1 o'clock this morning, found 
her safe delivered of a son about 2. James Hinckley's wife operated. 

27. Mr. Ballard been to Mr. Pollard's to hear trial of a case between the 
Rev. Mr. Foster and the Sewalls. 

29. I went with Mrs. Brown to hear the trial of Capt. Sewall and Thomas 
Sewall for defaming the Rev. Mr. Isaac Foster. They were found guilty 

December 27. Rev. Isaac Foster, who Thwing and Thomas Rioe. The oonrt 
had lived in Thomas Sewall's house on the house which was erected this year, partly 
east side of the river near the ferry, re- by subscription and partly by funds fur- 
moved to Amos Pollard's former house nished by the county, stood in the street 
which stood on what is now Orove street above the town meeting-house, directly 
(northerly side) near its present junction west of the present railroad track, 
with Green St. January 26. Nathan Sweatland (1754- 

January 4. The Couit of Common Pleas. 1814) lived at what is now known as London 

This was the first term held in ancient hill; he m. Rebecca, dan. of Seth Tarr and 

Hallowell — which had been made a half Anna McKenny his wife, of Oeoigetown. 

shire town by the legislature the previous He came to Hallowell in 1774 and died 

year. The judges were : William Lith- April 2, 1814. Eight children, 
gow. Senior., James Howard, Nathaniel 



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MRS. ballabd's diary. 257 

and fined and laid nnder bonds. I went to see Mr. Foster after court was 
over. 

1787. Febrnary 2. Was called at 10 to go to Mrs. Blake in travail. She was 
delivered of a daughter half after 11 in evening. I tarried all night; It's very 
cold. 

3. I returned from Mr. Blake's with Mr. Herren, went directly to Mr. 
Savage's. Lldia expired at half after 1 o'clock. 

4. Sunday. Rev. Mr. Moore preached. 

5. We attended faneral of Lldia Savage. Deacon Emerson made the 
prayer. 

8. I was called half after six this morn to James Savage's wife in travail. 
She was safely delivered at six, evening, of a fine son, her first child. 

9. I came home. Rode on a sled. 

10. I was called to see Seth Williams' youngest child and George Brown's 
children. 

18. Mr. Ballard went to his lot, finds £llia has trespassed. 

14. I was unwell, my throat sore ; went to bed at nine. Was called at 
half after 10 by Mr. Read to see his wife in travail. 

15. Mrs Read was delivered of a son at four this morn. 

17. Mr. Lapham of Pittstown here for herbs for his wife who is unwell. 

18. Sanday. I went to meeting, afternoon. Mr. Flold brought a note for 
thanks for his wife's delivery. 

23. I am very unwell. My face painful ; eat hastlpuding and water for 
breakfast and bean broth for dinner. 

24. I was called about sunrise to go to see Elias Taylor's wife In travail. 
Met a message iuforming she was safe delivered. 

26. Mr. Ballard been to get Mr. Savage to assist making a kirb for Mr. 
Foster's well. 

March 6. I was called to see the Widow Mary Shepherd In travail. Left 
home at five. Put her safe to bed with a daughter about 4 P. M. 

8. Rev. Mr. Foster and lady dined here. Esq. Petingale and Asa 
Williams also; informs us his wife was delivered of a daughter the 1st inst. 

9. Capt. Small here, and Mr. Ballard went home with him; he informs of 
the death of Capt. Howard's daughter Polly. 

10. Capt. Suall and Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Woodward's to George Stone 
who is confined with lameness. 

11. Sunday. The faneral of Capt. Samuel Howard's daughter Polly was 
attended after meeting. 

14. Mr. Weston and lady here, informs that Mrs. Allen expired. 

19. Mr. Ballard posting his book. Mr. Woodward and he settled accounts. 
22. Observed as a day of humiliation and prayer. I went to the house of 

worship, was called out by Mr. Swett at the conclusion of the first prayer. 
Went to the hook on ice; put his wife to bed safe with a daughter and slept 
at Mr. Dutton's. 

24. I went to Mr. Weston's afternoon. Mr. Brooks there. Shew dislike at 
my informing Mrs. Weston of some affiairs which happened in school. 

February 17. Roger Lapham (1746-1830), a settler at Pittston in 1784. 
17 



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258 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1787. March 25. Eliphalet Bobbins here and informed of the death of Anne 
Webb's child. 

27. Mr. Ballard at Capt. Sewairs, been laying out a road to Mr. Button's 
mill. 

29. Mr. Vose removed ft'om Mr. Emerson's to Dr. Coleman's. 

April 5. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Hersey's to run a line. Our saw mill went 
this day and night. 

8. Sunday. The boom opened and the logs went out of the crick. The 
river opened. 

12. Mr. Ballard been over the river to a meeting to choose malitia officers. 
They made choice of Mr. Porter, Capt. ; John Shaw, Lieut. ; Asa Williams, 
Ensign. 

15. Mr. Waid was published to Rachel Petingail. 

16. Mr. Ballard is gone to Winslow to purchase logs. Ephrlam Cowen 
tending sawmill. 

18. Mr. Ballard been to run a line at Mr. Stephen's. 

22. I was called to Mr. Wellman's at 9 this mom. His wife safe delivered 
at 7, evening, of a son. 

23. I came up by water, attended by Taylor and Hinkley. 

26. I was called at 2 o'clock to Nathan Tyler's wife in travail, found her 
delivered of a daughter. Doct. Williams operator. 

28. Mr. Ballard at Savage's mending the spads. 

May 1. Mr. Leighton sleeps here, informs that FlUbrook's house is burnt and 
most of his goods. 

8. I was called at 6 o'clock this morn to Charles Clark's wife who is In 
travail, and she was safe delivered of a daughter at 1 P. M. 

4. One of Jonathan's oxen fell down dead between here and Savage's as 
Gillson was driving them ; he had carried a load of barrels down for Mr. 
Wiman. 

6. I went to meeting without my cloak. Went to Mr. Weston's in intermission. 
Was called out of the meeting-house to go to see Mrs. Dany at the hook. Put 
her safe to bed with a son, her second child, about 4 o'clock. A vessel with 
families unloading at Mr. Weston's eddy. Anderson Taylor brought me a 
pair of shoes from Mr. Wellman's for my fee for assisting his lady. 

7. I was called to see Mr. Edson. There were 11 salmon catched in the 
sein at Kennedy's fishing place. 

8. Hannah and D«>lly, P^^phriam and Patty attended school. Town meeting 
yesterday. Doct. Coney chosen to represent this town in General Court. Mr. 
Carr delegate for Convention at Falmouth or Portland. 

9. I was called at 9 o'clock this morn to see Mrs. Hersey, she being in 
travail and was safe delivered of a fine son at 1 P. M. Mr. Thomas Sewall 
made me a present of a calve skin. 

May 6. Edmund Dana was a settler in May 8. Capt. James Can appears as a 

1789, and a potter by trade. His hoase and settler at the Hook in 1784. The conTention 

pottery were on the modern Justin £. was to consider the subject of the separa- 

Smith lot at the southwest comer of Win- tion of the District of Maine from Massa- 

throp and Middle streets, Hallowell. chosetts. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 259 

1787. May 12. I was called to see Mrs. Edson who was in travail. Arrived 
there at 4 o*clock, morn. Saw her husband lying In the road In Kennedy's Lane 
She was safe delivered at 3h. 21 m. P. M. of a fine daughter. May God Almighty 
bless her and help her to shun her father's wicked example. I heard from 
son Town. 

14. I went to Mrs. Howard's when T heard of the Esqr's death. Esqr. 
Howard departed this life. A sudden change ; he was well, and dead in about 
three hours. 

15. The girls went to school afternoon. Mr. Ballard ploughed flax in, I 
brewed. Samuel brought a salmon, weighed 21 one-half lbs. 

16. I attended the funeral of Judge Howard and tarried all night with the 
widow. She complained of a sore throat. A large fUneral. 

17. Hannah, Pamela and Dolly at school. Mr. Ballard is ploughing by the 
road. 

18. A preparatory lecture. Rev. Mr. Whiting delivered a discourse from 
Isaiah 55, v. 1st. There were but 26 persons in the house. 

19. Cyrus brought the bars, and other utensils for weaving, home. 

20. Sunday. The ordinance of the supper administered. George Couch 
desired prayers, he being very low. Mr. Leir and Rachel Faut, Smith and 
Mary Kenida published. 

21. Mr. Ballard surveying for Rev. Mr. Foster and been to Doct. Coney's. 
Mr. Savage made the irons for our loome. I paid him 4 shillings in cash. 

22. The girls went to school, afternoon. 

27. Sunday. George Coutch remains very sick yet. Desires prayers. 

28. Mr. Ballard bro't our kettle from Savage's. Mr. Edes assisted him. 

29. I was called to Mr. Belcher's his wife being unwell. 

SO. The south company met to choose their officers, made choice of Mr. 
Belcher for the captain, Mr. Hersey, Lieut. Mr. Church, Ensign. They 
all accepted. I am at Capt. Belcher's, still. Election this day. 
June 1. Mrs. Belcher taken iller at half after II — was safe delivered of a 
fine daughter at 20 minutes after 12 P. M. I returned by water, arrived home 
at half after 4. I went to see Becky Wiman, find her crazy. 

8. Sunday. Phillip Norcross' wife delivered of a daughter Slat of May 
last. 

5. Mr. Ballard laying out road by Capt. Sewall's. 

7. I was called at 4 o'clock this morn to see Stutely Springer's wife in 
travail. 

8. Mrs. Springer grew very ill about 1 o'clock this morning, called her 
women and was safe delivered at II of a fine son. I left her comfortable and 
returned at 3 P. M. George Couch departed this life last Wednesday 
evening. 

9. George Couch was interred this afternoon at the fort. Mrs. Voce and 
Betsy went on board the voyage bound for Boston this mom. 

May 18. Rev. (I) Thurston Whiting. (2) June 5. Afterwards named Howard 

Rev. Thurston Whiting (1752-1829). street. 

June 1. The wife of Supply Belcher, 
afterwards of Farmington. 



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260 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1787. June 1 1. I went to Capt. Sewairs to see his child ; sick with the 
rash; find it very ill. 

12. Mr. Ballard went to the hook on an arbitration. I hear that Mr. 
William Gardner departed this life yesterday. I sat up with Billy Sewall all 
night. 

13. I was at Capt. 8ewall*s the most of the day. Old Mrs. Fletcher came 
there and I came away. Crost the river in the boat. The wind very high. 
Mr. Gardner's remains are to be interred this day. 

17. Sunday. I hear that a woman from Boston by the name of Polly 
Frosts came to Mr. Pollard's in pursuit of John Leir [her recreant lover]. 

18. Capt. Sewall's son departed this life this morn. 

19. Mr. Ballard and the girls went to the funeral of Capt. Sewall's child. 
I am informed that Pamela Barton is published to Mr. Porter of Winthrop, a 
widower. 

23. Ibbee [Isabella] Howard departed this life at 4 o*clock morn. I came 
home after Mrs. Woodward. Savage and I had laid out her corps. Mr. 
Ballard gone to a meeting concerning building a school-house. 

24. Sunday. I went to meeting afternoon, attended the ftineral of Ibbee 
Howard. The wind blew so hard, I did not cross the river. We went to 
the field after meeting. 

26. Peggy came from Springer's ; informs that Mrs. Lambert Is dangerously 
sick ; lately put to bed with a son. 

28. I was called at 3 o'clock, morn, to Ebenezar Hewen's wife in travail. 
She was delivered of a daughter at 7. I then went to James Page's ; took a 
walk with him and lady through his improvements. They are beautiful. 
Mr. Hewen conducted me home about 2 p. m. Gave me 6s. as a reward. 
The girls, viz., Hannah and Dolly took a ride to Mr. Bisbee's accompanied by 
James and Joseph Burton. 

July 1. Sunday. We had ice an in tch thick in our yard south side of the 
house this morn. I attended public worship — a sermon preached on the 
death of Lady Howard's daughter — ought [to be] published. Isaac 
Leighton came here to work for us the ensuing week. 

8. Ephriam went to the meeting-house to catechising. 

4. Independence of America observed in this town. Seth and Joseph 
Williams' wives here. 

6. Mrs. Tyler brought the Black child here. 

8. Elihu Getchell and Polly Savage cry'd the first time. 

9. Mr. Ballard and the young men went to assist in raising Mr. Child's 
house. 

12. I was called to William Stone's wife in travail at 11 o'clock, mom. 
She was safe delivered of a son, first child, at 9 evening. I returned at 11, — 

Jane 12. Son of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner. vestry boilding occupies the same spot. 

Jane 13. William Gardiner, son of Dr. July 8. Crying intended hanns in meet- 
Sylvester Gardiner, was baried in the Epis- ing. 

copal churchyard of ancient Pittston (now July 9. At north side of the Winthrop 

Gardiner) . The chnrch building which road, a few rods above Dickman lane. The 

was set on fire by Henry McCansland, had house is stUl standing, 
been located over his grave. The present 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 261 

Sister Barton came here this day bj water. I heard a man fell down dead in 
the court house at Powaalboro yesterday. 

1787. July 14. Sister Barton and I took a walk as far as Mr. Savage *s. I 
hear Jobn North is sick. Gidlon Barton is unwell, we gave him some hysop 
tea, put tow on his throat. 

16. I was called to Mr. Savage's at 1 o'clock, mom, — his wife in travail, 
and was safe delivered at 11 p. m., of a daughter, — tho* dangerous for some 
time. 

19. Pamela Barton joined in wedlock with Mr. Porter yesterday. Mrs. 
Church was delivered of a son last Tuesday morn at 1 o'clock, 20 minutes. 
Doct. Cony's operation. Jeramy Badcock's wife the same night of a 
daughter. Old Mrs. Fletcher performed the office of a midwife. 

20. Mr. Densmore here for advice for his son who is lamb'd by a fall which 
bruised his knee. 

22. Sunday. I attended public worship. Rev'd Mr. Foster preached a 
discourse on the death of a daughter of £sqr. Huzzy's, who was burled last 
Sabbath day at Nantucket. 

25. I was called to Doct. Coney's to see Peggy Cool who is near expiring. 
From there was called to see Mrs. Brown who has a dreadfUl lame hand. 

26. Peggy departed this life about 3 o'clock this morning. 

27. Attended funeral of Peggy Cool; from that [went] to George Brown's, 
saw his wife's hand drest. 

28. To Rev'd Mr. Foster's to see him, find him very sick with the rash. 
Came to Mr. Brooks. Got some cold water root. Cyrus went and carried it 
to Mr. Foster. Mr. Ballard gone to assist Brother Moore raise a bam. 

29. Sunday. Cyrus went to see Lida Foster, finds her exceeding ill. I 
went to see her and Rev'd Mr. Foster who is very ill. I watched. Mr. 
Emerson performed the publick servis in bis stead. Mr. Ballard returned from 
my brother's ; bro't a horse which he had of Jethro Gardiner. 

30. Doct. Colmau informs that Betsy Stackpole was drowned 28th inst. in 
the river Sebastacook. May God sanctify the instance, to us all. Mr. 
Williams, Mr. Ballard and Dolly unwell. I bath't their feet and gave them 
some herb tea. I feel much fatigued myself. 

August 4. A very severe shower of h:iil with thunder and lltning, began at 
half after one, — continued near one hour. I hear it broke 130 pains of glass 
in Fort Western. Colonel Howard made a present of 1 gallon w. rhum and 
2 lbs. sugar on account of my atendance of his family in sickness. Peter 
Kenny has wounded his legg and bled excessively. 

5. Sunday. I was called at 9 o'clock to Mrs. Howard's to see James, he 
being very sick with the canker rash. 

July 19. B3ajamin Portar of Winthrop, Aui<ast 5. Tha widow of Capt. James 

and Pamela Barton of Hallowell. Howard ; she was livini? in the Great Honse , 

July 25. Dr. Cony then lived on tha lot so-caUed, which was located near the Wins- 

(now a part of the insane hospital farm) low road aboat ons mile northerly from 

opposite Mile Rock. Pollard's ferry. 

July 28. At PittJtDn (Girdlnsr). 



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262 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1787. August 6. I am at Mrs. Howard's watching with her sou. Went out 
about day ; discovered our saw -mill in flames. The men at the fort went over, 
found it consumed together with some plank and boards. 

7. I was called to Mrs. Howard's this morn for to see her son, find him 
Yery low. Went from Mrs. Howard's to see Mrs. Williams, find her very 
unwell. Hannah Cool is there. From thence to Joseph Foster's to see her 
sick children, find Samuel very ill. Came home; went to the field and 
got some cold water root. Then I called to Mr. Kenyday's to see Polly [who 
is] very ill with the canker; gave her some of the root and gargled her throat 
which gave her great ease. Returned home after dark. Mr. Ballard been to 
Cabesy. His throat is very soar; he gargled it with my tincture, finds relief 
and went to bed comfortably. 

11. Called from Mrs. Howard's to Mr. McMasters, to see their son William 
who is very low. 

12. Sunday. At Mr. McMasters*. Their son very sick. I sett up all 
night. 

13. William McMaster expired at 3 o'clock. Mrs. Paten and I laid out the 
child. Poor mother ! how distrest her case ; near the hour of labor and those 
children never very sick! Now at home; it is nine o'clock, morn. I feel 
depres't. I must take some rest. Find Mr. Ballard is gone to Plttston on 
business. Polly Is beginning to weave the handkerchiefs. Ephraim and I 
went to see Mrs. Williams at evening, find her some better. 

U. Mr. Ballard, I and all the girls attended fbneral of William McMaster. 
Their other children are mending. 
16. I was called to Mrs. Claton, in travail, at 11 o'clock, evening. 

16. At Mr. Cowen's. Put Mrs. Claton to bed with a son at 3 p. m. Came 
to Mrs. Keuaday's to see his wife who has a swelling under her arm. I 
returned as far as Mr. Pollard's by water. Called ft-om there to Winthrop to 
Jeremy Richards' wife in travail; arrived about 9 o'clock, evening. 

17. At Mr. Richards', his wife delivered of a daughter at 10 o'clock, mom. 
Returned as fletr.as Mr. Pollards at 12; walked from there. Mrs. Coy bury'd 

August 6. The original John Jones' mill. against American indepeDdance ; he would 

August 16. John Clayton was a native not tolerate in his presence any disparage- 

of Manchester, England ; he served nine ment of his ideal knight — John Burgoyne. 

years in the British army, and was a private He was addicted to harmless rhyming, and 

in the 17th regiment of dragoons under Bur- on one occasion his children —except the 

goyne when the latter surrendered his two oldest daughters who had charge of the 

forces to the continentals at Saratoga patients,— being ill, he perpetrated the 

October 17, 1777 ; he came to Fort Western following : 

settlement in 1784 or '35, and was taxed As my two daughters did combine 

herein 1786. He removed to the Sandy To nurse the army of Old Burgoyne; 

River Township (Farmington) in 1787. Their nursing was good — 

He m. (1) in October, 1786, Susanna Cowen But not very lastin', 

of Hallowell, who soon died, together with For they were grand-daughters 

her infant child; he m. (2) Sally, dan. of Of Old Granny Asten. 

John Austin (usually pronounced Asten) He died in Farmington, September 10, 

who became the mother of his ten children. 1832, aged 74 years. 
He was whimsically proud of his English —Butler's Hist, of Farmington, 

nationality and of his service in the war 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 263 

a daughter yesterday. Mr. Stanley has a daughter daugerous. William 
Wicher 2 children, also. 

1787. August 18. Geny Huston had a child born the night before last. I 
was called by James Hinkley to see his wife at 11 and 30, evening. Went as 
far as Mr. Weston's by land; from thence by water. 

20. Mr. Hinkley brought me to Mr. Weston's. I heard there that Mrs. 
Claton's child departed this life yesterday, and that she was thot expiring. 
I went back with Mr. Hinkly as far as there. She departed this life about 1 
p. m. I asisted to lay her out ; her infant laid in her arms, the first such 
instance I ever saw, and the first woman that died in childbed which I 
delivered. We hear that three children expired in Winthrop last Saturday 
night. 

22. I attended ftmeral of Mrs. Claton and her infant, p. m. 

23. Was called to Mrs. Shaw, who had been ill some time. Put her safe 
to bed with a daughter at 10 o'clock this evening. She is finely. 

24. Called ftom Shaw's to James Hinkly 's ; wife in travail ; put her safe to 
bed with a son at 7 o'clock this morn. Doctor Cony's wife delivered of a 
daughter last evening at 10 o'clock. 

29. Mr. Gillbreath went to Churche's with the spindle of the mill to be 
flted. 

30. Mr. Ballard workt at the bridge. 

September 1. An ox trod on Mr. Ballard's foot and lamed it very much. I 
bath't it with camphor and turpentine. 

2. Sunday. I attended public worship. ^The Rev'd Mr. Farars ftrom the 
westward performed. Lieut. John Shaw and Rachel Kenady were publlsht. 

8. Jonathan gone to Cabesy to attend a court concerning some uneasiness 
which happened between old Mr. McCausland and son, and Luke Barton, and 
himself, some time since. 

7. I was called to see Mrs. McMasters, in travail, at 7, evening. 

8. Mrs. McMasters put to bed about 2 this morn, with a son. The infant 
very weak and low. 

9. Doctor Colman published to Sukey Atkins of Nubery. 

10. I went to Mr. McMasters', find their infant deseast. It was interred 
this evening. 

14. Mr. Ballard gone to Vassalborough to run lines for Mr. Carr. 
18. I was called to Rev'd Mr. Foster's lady in travail. She was safe 
delivered of a fine son at 7, evening. It is her second child. 

25. Mr. Ballard gone to Capt. Page's to help remove his house. 

October 1. Mrs. Barton returned from Winthrop. Informs Mr. Chandler's 
daughter Walton deceased Sept. 20, and Mrs. Wing last week, both in child- 
bed. 

4. Doctor Williams sett Major Dutton's thigh which was broke yesterday. 

7. Sunday. I attended public worship. Mr. Bent had two sons baptized, 
one by the name of Rufus, the other David Jackson. 

August 24. (1) At the New France settle- August 29. Mr. Gilbreth or Kiibreth, a 

ment, South Hallowell. (2) Paulina Bass millwright. 

Cony, who became the wife of Nathan September 3. Robert McCausland, the 

Weston, Jr. father of Henry who became a maniac. 



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264 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1787. October 4. Was called to see Mr. Sanford, find him very low. Rev'd 
Mr. Little made a prayer with him. 

11. At Mr. Pollard's till evening. Find Dolly lame. Poaltised her foot 
with sorril roasted. 

13. Mr. Weston had a potash fralm raised. 

14. Sunday. The Rev'd Mr. Foster preacht at Vassalboro. Esqr. 
Lovejoy's lady is sick. 

19. Gideon Sanford departed this life. 

20. I attended funeral of Mr. Sanford. Was called at llh. dOm. to see 
Mrs. Goodwin in travail. 

21. Sunday. Arrived at Mr. Andrew Goodwin's at Ih. mom. Find her 
safe delivered of a fine daughter. Lady Cox, operator. Attended worship, 
afternoon. The Rev'd Mr. Foster's son baptized, named Nathaniel. 

24. Mr. Vahn [Vaughan] here. Mr. Hadon [Hayden] fell into the river ; 
came here for a shirt to put on till he dried his cloaths. 

25. I was called to go to John Cummings' at Wiuthrop at 6h. 80m. mom. 
Went about 6 miles, had a fall ftrom the hoi*se ; did not receive much hurt. 
Was informed the lady was safe delivered of a son. Returned at 30m. 9h* 
Doctor Barton and Pamely here on their way to the westward. I wish them 
safe passagp. Cyrus went to help them to the vessel. 

27. Am informed the Rev'd Mr. Foster is very sick ; has sent for Doctor 
Williams. 

28. Sunday. I attended worship. Deacon Emerson performed. 
November 2. Mr. Ballard took Mr. Chace's oxen for taxes this day. 

5. I was called about midnight to go see William White's wife. Seth 
Williams after me to see his wife also in travail. Mrs. White safe delivered 
of a son by the asistance of Moses White's wife before I arrived. I was 
exceeding sick while there. 

6. I am informed that Seth Williams' wife was safe delivered at 7 o'clock 
this morn. She had a son. 

8. Clear. Son Town came for me. I went there [to Winslow]. We 
ariv'd at 8 o'clock, evening. 

10. At son Town's. Old Lady Thorn's ftineral, attended. 

14. At Town's. Lucy [the Diarist's daughter] was delivered of a daughter 
at 4h. and 30m. P. M. 

16. I returned home ftom son Ephraim Town's. Left them as well as 
could be expected. 

18. I attended public worship ; the Rev'd Mr. Foster performed ; we had 
but one exercise by reason of his weakness. 

19. I was called to Mrs. Beaman, in travail, at 9 o'clock ; she was safe 
delivered of a daughter. I left her comfortable, and returned home at 7 p. m. 

October 28. Brown Emerson, a trader at Jr., was first assessed for a tax in 1781. It 

the Hook. was probably the latter who lost his oxen 

November 2. Ezekiel Chase, Sr., was through the harshness of the tax law. 

one of the tax-payers in the south part of November 5. William White became a 

the town in 1772 ; his son, Ezekiel Chase, settler here in 1783. 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 265 

1787. November 21. I rose by candle-light. Theoph. [Hamlen] laying the 
floor of the east room. I was called to see Mrs. Braeley in travail, who was 
safe delivered at 12 o'clock of a seventh son and loth child. 

22. Theoph. sealing the east room. Mr. Ballard and Jonathan agreed to 
rebuild the saw-mill. 

23. Mr. Ballard and Jonathan at Mr. Davis' drawing writings with Mr. 
Silas Lee. 

Si. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr Vahn. 

25. Mr. James Page desired prayer — the death of his father. Hannah and 
Dolly were fritind by a baire [flrightened by a bear] between here and 
neighbor Savage's. 

26. Called to see Mrs. Williams who is In travail. 

27. Mrs. Williams safe delivered of a daughter, at 7 o'clock, room. 

28. I helpt Mrs. Williams up and maid her bed, and returned home. Was 
called in haste to see Mrs. Williams, she being in a deleriam by reason of a 
misstep of her husband, tho' not desiring to injure her. 1 tarried till 8 o'clock, 
mom. Left her rationall tho' exercised with some pain. 

29. This day observed as a Public Thanksgiving. I attended public 
servis. 

80. Was called by Mr. Seth Williams to see his son Moses who is very 
unwell. We gave him some senna and manna. 

December 1. Pleasant. Mrs. Pollard came here with her son Amos who 
had a lame knee. I bathed it with camphor and mallalot ointment; applied a 
plaster of my salve ; Benjamin White called me to see Becky. 

8. At Benjamin White's. Becky ill all day; her women with her. Shee 
was safe delivered about ten, evening, of a daughter. 

5. Some boys on our mill pond. Gash [Gershom] North fell in; was 
helpt out again safe ftom harm. 

7. Mrs. Pollard came here to instruct Dolly how to worp our handkerchiefs. 
Mr. Bradstreet dined here. 

8. Mr. Ballard sett up the loom, and went to the Hook. 

9. I attended public worship. The river was not passable at Fort 
Western. 

10. I hear that three men fell into the river this day. It snowed, afternoon. 

13. Mr. Ballard been to Deacon Emery's [Emerson's]. Was making rates. 
Eleazor Luce was killed by the fall of a tree. 

14. Mrs. McKnight sleeps here ; her husband hastened her out a dores, as 
shee says. 

16. I am informed that Daniel Fairfield, junior, of Vassalboro, departed 
this life the 12th inst., and Jeremy Hall's wife the 6th, — shee of this town. 

November 23. Silas Lee, lawyer, of part of the town which continned to bear 

WIscasset. No lawyer then resided in the name of Hallowell after the division 

Hallowell. Silas Lee was a brother of John (in 1797). 

Jones* wife, and hence Lee's connection December 7. Andrew Bradstreet (1722- 

with the Jones' mill property, which seems 1804) who located at Pittston (Gardiner), 

never to have been in the ownership of the in 1780. His wife was Mary Hill of Bidde- 

Ballards. ford. They were the parents of eleven 

December 1. Benjamin White was a children and the ancestors of the Bradstreet 

/wttler here before 1771. He lived in the families of Gardiner. 



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266 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

16. Sunday. Mrs. Ingerham informs me that Mrs. Tolman was delivered 
of a daughter last weak. 

17. Mr. Warrin of Berwick sleeps here. 

18. Mr. Ballard at Mr. Emerson's, making raitis. 

19. Mr. Ballard gone on the divislou line between Rev. Mr. Foster and 
Mr. Kenady. 

21. ^r. Ballard been at Deacon Emerson's making raits. I have been at 
home. Am informed that Mr. Seaman's infant expired this day; also that Mr. 
Charles Weber buried a child this week. 

22. I went to the Hook. Was at Major Dutton*s, Mrs. Hallo wlVs, Mr. 
Densmore's, Rev. Mr. Porter's and Williams'. Theophilus Hamlen maid a 
book caise and put it up in the east room. 

26. Hear that Rachel Faught was delivered of a daughter 22d Inst.; 
William Cowen's wife a son the 23d. Mrs. Fletcher performed. 

27. Doctor Tupper took breakfast here. 

28. Mrs. Ballard went to help move a house for Doctor Colman. 

29. We received a letter from our friend Halns. Learned of the 19th Inst., 
informing us of the death of my honoured mother, who departed this life after 
a short illness the 4th Inst. Her desease was the palsy. Shee was aged 72 
years the 27th of July last, old stile. He also informs us my sister Deborah 
was safe delivered of a sou and that my other friends were in health ; and of 
an accident by Are which hapen'd on the night of the 5th inst., in Oxbridge, — 
a house consumed with four persons, — 2 aged and 2 children. 

80. Sunday. Clear. I attended divine serves. Went to Mr. Weston's In- 
termision, and was called at 7h. evening, to see Thomas Kenny's wife in 
travail. I broke through the ice on the Eddy by Capt. Sewal's; went into the 
water to my waist ; got out without asistance. Mr. Kenny carried me a shoar 
In his arms. I mounted his horse wet as I was, rode to Mr. White's in haste; 
found the patient very ill. Shee was safe delivered at lOh. and dOm. of a 
daughter and Is cleverly. 

81. Mr. Kenny conducted me home. We arrived at 4h. mom. I made a 
fire and hett my feet ; then went to bed and lay till ten. Then rose and felt 
much better than my fears. Now 1787 is ended. It happy is if we are 
mended. God grant if not, we may be I 

In this year 1787, I have extracted 12 sons and 15 daughters. Been called 
to 7 women which were delivered before my arrival. 

Hallowell, Dec. 31, 1787. Martha Ballard, Her Diary. 

1788. 

January 19. Doctor Cony here. Mr Ballard gone to Colonel North's. I 
went to Mr. Williams'. I sent Mrs, Densmore 14 pills by her son. 

20. Sunday. There was no preaching. It is very bad storming. Death of 
Mrs. Kenny's daughter. 

December 27. Doctor Tupper lived In abandoned, near Nova Scotia, a total l0i«. 

Pownalborough (now Dresden) . In 1792 December 30. Howard's eddy, since 

he fitted out a timber-ship or raft, for Eng- filled by allaviam. The place is now 

land, which proved onmanageable and was known as North's island. 



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MKS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 267 

1788. January 21. I am informed that Capt. Page's infant expired 19th 
inst., and is to be interred this day. 

22. Seth Pitts here ; I drest his woands. 

23. We are informed that Henry Knowland expired this morn. 

24. Thee remaines of Henry Knowland interred at 4h. p. m. 

25. It snowed. Mr. Ballard posted books. 

26. Was informed that John Blake lost his house by fire 14th inst. And 
that Jetho Gardner his the 24th. 

28. Capt. Savage here. Mr. Ballard went with him to Deacon Emerson's to 
prepare something for the relief of Mr. Knowland whose family are sick and 
much distrest. 

31. I was called to see Mr. Weston who has an ulsor gathering in his throat. 
Am informed of the death of William Kenady's wife at Sandy river. Capt. 
Norcross marled to Mrs. Nancy Norcross. 

Feb. 1. I returned from Mr. Weston's; he is not better, has sent for Doct. 
Williams. Henry Babcock\s wife delivered of a daughter, 17th of January. 

3. We hear that Mr. Weston is better. 

4. I was called at 1 h. morn, to Capt. Noys' wife in travail. Shee was safe 
delivered of a fine son at 1 b. P. M. This is her second son and seventh child. 

5. We are Informed that Andrew Goodwin's wife is very sick, sent for 
Doct. Williams. 

7. I was called to see Mr. Savage Bolton's wife in travail, at7h. morn. 
Shee was safe delivered of a very fine son at 12 o'clock. Mr. Ballard been to 
Broth. Moore's ; returned at 10. Informs that Jacob Foot buried a daughter 
this day. Eliab Shaw's wife came to her father's this day, the most of the 
way on snow shoes. Her husband and children sick. 

8. Mr. Emerson rote advertisements forbidlng any person leting Calvin 
Edson have any spirituous liquor. Son Town's infant deceased. 

9. Mr. Emerson went and put Jabis Cowen and his daughter Rebekah to 
Mr. Woodward's. 

10. Sunday. Rev'd Mr. Moore preacht here. Son Town's babe interred. 
22. My son Ephraim was seized with a fitt at ten o'clock ; had a very severe 

one. My family were all in bed except myself. Cyrus called, and I went in 
haste with a light. We all expected he was expiring; but were in the use of 
means. Put his feet in warm water, pry'd his teeth apart and put down salt 
and water. He came to his senses in about half an honr, and rested pretty 
well the rest of the night. 

24. Sunday. I went to meeting, afternoon. Mr. Nason had a daughter 
baptized by the name of Lidia. 

Jannary 23. Henry Nowlan became a February 8. Brown Emerson, one of 

resident here in 1785. the selectmen. Ephraim Ballard and 

Jannary 26. (1) John Blake lived near James Carr were his associates that year, 

the Hook, on the road to the cross-roads. Brown Emerson located here in 1785, bat 

(2) Jethro Gardiner lived in Yassalboro did not remain long, 
(now Sidney). 



\ 



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268 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1788. February 25. Jonathan and the girls were gone to ride in a sleigh. 
They came home half past 12 [at night]. 

27. Mr. [Luke] Barton and I left our house at 9 this morn ; arrived at his 
[in Winslow] at 3 p. m. Find his wife in travail and her woman called. Mrs. 
Spincer was there. She was called at 10 to Mrs. Simson. It is very cold. 

28. Mrs. Barton was safe delivered of a son at 1 this morn, and is cleverly. 
I forgave Mrs. Barton my fee for my attending her. 

March 2. Sunday. I went to.meeting, and was called at 6h. p. m., to see 
Mrs. Hovey In travail. Arrived there about 7. 

8. Mrs. Hovey was safe delivered of a fine son at Ih. morn. I returned 
home at half after Ih. p. m. 

5. Mr. Jabesh Cowen*s house was consumed by fire this mom. 

6. James Cofirin cutt wood at the door. 

9. Sunday. The sun shined part of the day. Mr. Ballard and I attended 
public worship. There were strangers at meeting. 

11. Am informed that the wife of Daniel Branch was delivered of a son 
yesterday. Mr. Larence Goodin's also of a daughter. William Elis removed 
out of this town. 

12. Charles Harris was here to have his hands drest. I gave him some 
salve. He was burnt attempting to save his house when burning. 

14. A house burnt at New Gloster and a lad in it. 

25. Mr. Woodward and his wife here. They broke their sleigh coming 
down the hill. 

27. I was called to Mr. Benjamin Bisbee*s, his wife being in travail. 

28. Mrs. Bisbee was delivered of a daughter at 2h. this mom. I was called 
to Mr. Hains' at 4, afternoon. 

29. I am at Mr. Haines'; his wife was safe delivered at 5h. mom, of a 
daughter, her 10th child. 

81. Mr. Ballard been to see about school. 

April 1. Was called to Capt. Sewall's lady, in travail, walkt over the river. 
Safe arrived at 8h. evening. 

2. Mrs. Scwall's women were called, and she was safe delivered at 7h. 
morn, of a fine daughter [became the wife of Eben Dutch] and is cleverly. 
Mrs. Pollard, Voce, and I crost on the ice. There was a moose by our garden 
this afternoon. 

8. I went to Mr. Chamberlain's. Found his daughter Betsy expired at 9h. 
this morn, and the family in tears. I assisted Mrs. Woodward lay out the 
corps. Came home. I sett out to attend funeral of Betsy Chamberlain. Met 
thera with the corps. Dolly and I followed as far as Colonel North's. The 
Ice moved and they could not pass over the river. The corps were put into 
the meeting house. 

March 11. Daniel Branch came here in March 28. John Hains lived near the 

1787. place now called Granite hill in Hallowell. 

March 25. The hill is now known as April 3. Samuel Chamberlain, a settler 

Mill street. on the ancient Vassalboro road, west side, 

March 27. Benjamin Bisbee and his near Indian (Ballard) brook, in the pres- 

father, Elisha, settled here in 1786. ent ward five. 



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MRS. BALLARD*S DIARY. 



269 



1788. April 6. The remains of Betsy Chamberlain were Interred at 1 p. 
m. Jonathan assisted. 

6. Sunday. I went meeting, afternoon. There were but 4 females except 
myself. The river open so that the people crost by water. The road very 
muddy. Thee bridge is wreckt. 

7. The town mett to vote for Governors. Thee annual meeting also. 
9. Doct. Coney opened the soar on Patty Williams' throat. 

11. Mr. Ballard is gone to Wiscasset on business. An accident at Wich- 
caset, — Mr. Jack Brown shot thro the back. 

12. I have made 28 doz. dipt candles,— 6 1-2 lbs. of the tallow Cyrns*. 

13. Mr. Ballard came home from Wiscaset. 

17. This day observed as Fast and prayer. I attended worship, afternoon, 
and went to see Rev*d Mr. Foster's son Isaac who is afflicted with soars, — 
thought to be the salt rhame. Find him very poorly. Hear that Capt. Samuel 
Oakman's lady expired in travail yesterday. Jonathan gone to Winslow 
after mill timber. 

18. Mrs. Oakman's remains interred. 

19. Jonathan came home ft-om Winslow with the timber; all well. 

21. Mr. Ballard been with Mr. Carr and Capt. Sewall to the lott of land 
which Mr. Savage and he owned. They 'prized it at 16 shillings an acre. 

24. Mr. Ballard been to Cabesy ; bot cloath for a pair of breaches. 

27. Eliphalet Bobbins has broke his collar bone and hurt his arm. 

29. Samuel Blake was interred ; he departed this life yesterday. 

80. Mr. Densmore brot Mr. Ballard's breaches home. 

May 1. Mr. Voce was called away at noon to attend a coart between 
Thomas Sewall, plaintiff, and Rev. Mr. Foster, defendant. 

2. Jonathan and Daniel Bobbins brot a barrel of cyder here from the Hook. 



April 6. In the Fort Western (or How- 
ard) barying-groond. 

April 6. The early bridges over Jones' 
brook were the sport of the freshets, and 
they were often wrecked and sometimes 
swept away. They were constructed of 
stringers covered with pnncheon for the 
roadway,— all cat from the adjacent forest. 
They were on the level of the intervale, 
and no extraordinary rise of water was 
necessary to submerge them ; ice freshets 
invariably destroyed them. In 1789 the 
selectmen (Joseph North, Chainnan) lo- 
cated and bnilt a bridge across the mill 
pond, at a higher grade than ever before, 
but that disappointingly went the way of 
its predecessors. At a town meeting held 
Hay 5, 1794, it was voted that the sum of 
20 pounds b3 raised for the express purpose 
of building '*a bridge over Ballard's brook. 



so called." In September following the 
towD voted and chose Theophilus Hamlen 
(the surveyor), Ezra Smith and Beriah 
Ingraham to complete the bridge, and "if 
necessary to lay out a further sum not 
exceeding 30 pounds. This bridge was 
elevated fifteen feet above the water, on 
stone abutments, and stood until replaced 
in 1849 by the present granite arched 
bridge,— which was bnilt under the personal 
supervision of Ephraim Ballard, 3d, a 
grandson of the Diarist. 

April 27. Eliphalet Bobbins came to 
this town in 1787. 

April 30. Thomas Densmore, a tailor, 
came here in 1783, and became a permanent 
resident. 

May 2. Daniel Bobbins came here in 
1783. 



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270 BISTORT OF AUOUSTA. 

1788. ICaj 4. Mr. Brooks and Jadge Howard's widow pablished. Mr. 
Mathews and his brother sleep here. 

5. There lias been a town meeting. They made choice of Doctor Coney to 
represent ns in General Assembly. 

6. James Barton woanded his legg. 

7. Thankfhl Croell departed this life the 4th day after she was seized of the 
pntrid ferer. James Bolton and Mr. Green workt lialf the day hailing the 
mill timber into the door yard. 

8. Mr. Joseph Foster brot his wife here; she had a fearer fltt while here. 
I hare been at home. Hannah wove three yards of wail cloth. Polly Cool 
here. Theophilns [Hamlen] U pabllsht to Sally Rockit [Rock wood] of Oxford. 

11. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and Cyrus attended meeting. Andrew Goodin's 
wife was prayed for. Pamelah Barton's daughter bom. 

12. I am informed that Benjamin Porter's wife was delirered of a daughter 
the 10th inst. and is cleverly. 

13. I went to the Hook, was at Colonel Dntton*s ; his lady is low, but on 
the recovery. I was at Mrs. HallowelFs, Mr. Densmore's, Rev'd Mr. Foster's, 
Joseph Foster's, Mr. Weston's and Joseph Williams'. 

16. I was called at half after 12b. mom, to Mrs. Moses Sewall at the Hook; 
was safe delivered at 5h. p. m. of a fine daughter and is cleverly. I tarried 
all night. 

17. David Pollard oversetts his boat in the river. 

20. Mr. Ballard been at Vassalboro, laying out a road through the town. 
Mr. Gillbreath helpt Cyms dress mill. 
22. Old Mr. Contch departed this life at 2h. p. m. 

24. Mr. Ballard went to Squire North's to hear coart between Mr. Foster 
and the Sewalls. Jonathan went to Echabod Pitts* for com. The remains 
of Mr. Contch were interred. 

25. Was called at llh. evening, to Mr. Moses White's wife in travail. I 
walkt over the string piece of the bridge by Mr. Hovey's. Ephraim Cowen 
publish t to Hannah Savage. 

26. Mrs. White was safe delivered of a fine daughter at 7h. mom. I left 
them for home at noon. 

28 Election at Boston. Capt. Porter returned ftt>m Boston. 

29. Mr. Ballard been with a committee on the road west side of the river. 
Nathaniel Brown was drowned last night near Mr. Kennady's. 

81. I was called in haste to see Sally Williams; shee had a very ill turn; 
her mother fainted ; the child revived. I tarried all day. Doctor Emerson 
called to see it. We rnbed it with vinegar. Gave blisters. 

June 1. I was called to Capt. Porter's Lady in travail at 4h. mom. Shee 
was safe delivered of a fine daughter at 10 and is comfortable. 

6. Theophilus Hamlin and James Burton sett out for Oxford. 

May 4. William Brooks and Susanna, May 8. Rockwood. 

widow of Captain James Howard, and May 22. Adam Conch was a settler at 

who had been the wife of Lieutenant the Hook at the time of the incorporation 

Samuel Cony (1746-1779). of the town. 



* 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 271 

1788. June 8. Nathaniel Brown taken np and interred. 

9. Hannah is very unwell. I called Doctor Colman to her assistance ; he 
gave an emetick which operated kindly and gave relief. I was called by Polly 
Wheeler to Mr. Williams* to lay ont the corps of their daughter Sally who ex- 
pired between eleven and twelve this evening. 

10. We all except Cyrus attended the fUneral of Sally Williams at 5h. p. m. 
Mrs. Williams fainted after shee returned home. 

11. I have been to Colonel Howard*s; he made me a present of a casse 
bottle of wine. 

14. Was called to Mr. Isaac Clark's to see Mrs. Nancy; she has St. An- 
thony's fire; [erysipelas] is in pain and very much worried. 

15. Sunday. Capt. Stickney and Mrs. Nabby Jackson published. 

16. Was called to Mr. Weston's. James is near expiring. Esquire Lion 
and Betsy Wheler published. 

17. James Weston expired at 3h. morn, aged 4 years, 1 month and 11 days. 
I laid him out, assisted by Mrs. Lois Harris and Polly Hinkley. Mrs. North 
came in to see them. Mr. Ballard laying out roade by the river below Mr. 
Pollard's. 

20. I was called to Daniel Savage, junior's, wife, who is in travail, ^t lOh. 
morn. Shee was safe delivered of a son at 9h. evening. 

21. At Ih. 20m. a shower of hail and rain with thunder. The lightning 
struck 2 trees at Capt. Page's. 

22. I attended public worship. Rev'd Mr. Foster preached ftom Micah 
6 and 8. 

23. The workmen — four — came to fraim the saw-mill. Mrs. Weston made 
me a present of 3 lbs. of sugar. 

25. Mrs. King of Winthrop here. Informs that Wm. Pulllng's wife is very 
111 with a broken legg. 

26. Jonathan is gone to raising of Capt Nehemiah Getchell's house. 

29. Sunday. The Rev'd Mr. Foster absent; gone to preach at Fairfield. 

30. Was called at 6 to Mr. B. Brown's. 

July 1. Mrs. Brown safe delivered at 4, of a fine son. I returned at 9h. 
mom. Left them cleverly. 

6. Son Town was here yesterday ; he was after Doctor Williams for Capt. 
Haul's child. 

7. We raised the saw-mill fraim. Mr. Marshall and Thomas Moore wore 
hurt ; the business other ways done with safety. There were a vast concorse 
of men and children, and not many disguised with Llcquor. The young folks 
had a dance here at evening. Disperst at midnight. Robert Denison's wife 
delivered of a daughter by Mrs. Fletcher. 

8. Mrs. Livermore delivered of a son by Doctor Coney at 11 evening. 

9. Myself and daughters attended funeral of Mrs. Foster. Mr. Thwing 
very much dlstrest with Austma [asthma]. 

12. Spent part of the day seeking the red cow. Cyrus and True found her 
with a calf and drove them home. I hear Norcross is comin, and that his 

June 26. In Yassalboro. 



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272 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

brother fell overboard and was drowned on his passage. I hear from coart 
the criminal [was] condemned; and Rev*d Mr. Foster has lost his case with 
Wallcer. 

1788. July 16. Theophilus Hamlen went to hons keeping. 

18. Parthena been to Rev'd Mr. Foster's ; his lady gave her a yard ribbon 
and sent one to Dolly. 

20. Sunday. I was called to Isaac Hardin*s wife in travail. Found Mrs. 
Harden poorly; she was safe delivered of a fine son at llh. and 1-2 evening. 
I tarried all night. 

21. I left Mrs. Hardin at 6h. mom, as cleverly as conld be expected. Called 
at Mrs. Williams' ; find her husband expired at 3h. morn. 

22. I attended funeral of Mr. Joseph Williams. There were a large con- 
coarse of people. The widow fainted. I gave her some drops and shee 
revived. 

23. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. Vahn. 

24. Mr. Ballard surveying for Thomas Hinkley. Capt. Benjamin Stikny 
married to Nabby Jackson. 

25. Mr. Carr and Mr. Page here, fixing to take the valuation. 

26. Brother Moore here ; he left Boston yesterday mom. 

27. Sunday. Very rainy. Mr. Ballard went to the meetlng-honse and met 
Rev*d Mr. Foster and Mr. Savage ; there was no preaching. 

29. Mr. Ballard been surveying for Shuba! Hinkly. 

80. A very remarkable appearance In the atmosphere this evening. 

81. Briant Fletcher*8 wife delivered of a son. 
August 2. I hurt my foot with a plank. 

7. I was called to John Shaw's lady who Is In travail. Shee was safe 
delivered of a daughter about llh. evening. I returned home at two. 

10. Sunday. Mr. Gould, a gentleman from N. Bralntree, preacht here. 

11. I was at Wido. Williams' all day; we thought the child was expiring. 
I hear that old Mrs. Hutchlns of Winthrop departed this life sudenly this day. 

13. I was called from Mrs- Williams, at 12h. and 30m. to Mr. Fuller's Lady 
in travail. Shee was safe delivered at Ih. p. m. of a son. 

14. I went to wldo Williams ; tarried all night ; her child very 111. Old 
Mrs. Fletcher and Sally and Polly Tillton there. I set up. 

15. I came home at the 5th h. Went to sleep on the 8th h. and to wido 
Williams' at 1 p. m. Found Mrs Cumings there. Fatty expired at 5h. p. m. 
aged 8 months and 19 days and 10 hours. I put on her grave cloaths with the 
aslstance of Mrs. Cumings and Mrs. Hannah McKethay. 

16. We attended fUneral of Patty Williams who was interred this evening. 

July 12. 'The criminal condemned" was cat, supposed to have been caused by an 

John O'Neil, charged with murdering his axe or an iron bar. O'Neil claimed that 

companion, Michael Cleary, for money, at the wonnds resulted from a fall ; at the 
Pdmaq[aid falls. Both were Irishmen. ' coroner's Inquest he told inconsistent and 

Money was found in the possession of contradictory stories to account for the 

O'Neil which he pretended had been given facts. (Capital Trials in Maine, by Joseph 

him by Cleary. The latter's dead body Williamson, Coll. Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., 2d 

showed braises about the head, and a deep Series, Vol. I.) Sae entry of September 4th. 



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MRS. ballabd's diabt. 273 

The widdow attended. Her mother is the only suryiving branch of that 
family. 

1788. Aogast 1 7. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and Mr. Savage and old Mr. White 
mett at the meeting-honse. Mr. Foster was not there. 

18. Jonathan been to Pitts Town for a pair of shoes. 

20. Captain Porter has beat Mr. Isaac Savage and abnsed him reiy mnch. 

21. I went to Mr. Savage's; he came home; his face very much brused 
and sweled. I came home ; had news that his coal pitt was like to bum up. 
I rode to the neighbors below to call asistance to pntt it oat. 

22. I was called at 9h. mom, to see Jotham Smith's wife who was in labour, 
and was safe delivered of a fine son at the 12th hour. 

24. Sunday. Bev'd Mr. Foster spoke flrom Genesis 2 and 7 ; made a very 
fine discoarse. 

25. Mrs. Childs here to warp a web. 

26. I was called by Doctor Colman to see his Lady in travail, at the 7th 
hour, evening. 

27. At Doctor Colman's ; his lady was safe delivered of a fine son at 8h. 
mom. 

80. I was called to Shuball Hinkly's wife in travail at the 12th h. She was 
safe delivered of a very fine daughter at 2 p. m. We raised the saw-mill 
floor. 

September 1. Patrig wounded his foot with an adds [adze]. Mr. Ballard 
mett the auditors at Colonel Howard's. 

2. Dolly is 16 years old this day ; shee went to Mr. Cragg's and bot a hatt 
for 9 shillings. 

4. Jonathan and Taylor went to see the execution of O'Neal. The wife of 
old Mr. Springer departed this life this mora. 

6. I went to Doctor Colman's at Ih. p. m.; his child expired at 4. I put 
on the grave cloaths and tarried till 7. Colonel North and Lady there. Beriah 
Ingerham had a son born. 

6. Funeral of Mrs. Springer and Doctor Colman's infant. I attended the 
latter. 

7. Sunday. The Bev'd Mr. Moore preacht. 

9. The town met to hear Bev'd Mr. Foster's proposals, but did not except 
them. 

10. Mr. Voce and Parmer laying shingles on our house. 

September 4. See entry of July 12th. Justice [William Cnshing] then gave them 

This was the first judicial execotion on the some farther instmctions, after which they 

Kennebec river. William Lithgow, Jr., retired for a few moments only, and brought 

who then had recently located as a lawyer in a verdict of guilty." The court pro- 

at Fort Western, was of the counsel for nounoed the sentence of death, and O'Neil 

O'Neil, and made an able and spirited was hung from a gallows erected in a field 

defence. A contemporary newspaper said easterly from the court house at Fownal- 

'*the trial took up the most part of the day, boro. 

and when the jury returned they declared September 6. Dr. Colman was then 

they could not agree. One of them, a good living in the Thomas Bewail house, in the 

man, seemed to think he ought not to give tenement left vacant by the temporary re- 

his voice against the prisoner, because moval to New York of Captain Henry 

there was no positive evidence. The Chief SewaU. 

18 



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274 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1788. September 11. Cyrus is gone to Gardner's mill. 

14. Sunday. I attended worship in public. Nathaniel Norcross desired 
prayers, he being siclc with a feaver. Bev^'d Mr. Foster delivered two excelent 
discoarses f^om Psalm 90 and 12 verse. 

17. I was called between 12 and Ih. morn, to Eliab Shaw's wife in traTail; 
shee was safe delivered at the 11th h. of a fine daughter. I left them cleverly. 
David Fletcher*s daughter born. 

19. The bridge over this crick was finisht this day. 

21 . Sunday. The Rev'd Mr. Foster delivered 2 fine discoarses, Arom Romans 
10, &c. 

23. Mr. Dany*s child expired at the evening. 

25. Mr. Ballard and the other men went to Pitts town to help raise a mill. 
I was called to see Mrs. Welch in travail. Shee was safe delivered at 9 p. m. 
I came home at 11. 

27. I went on board Capt. Dean and received 7 shillings on Stutley Spring- 
er's account, which was my due for atending his wife and medicin. 

29. Mr. Parmer's son of Winthrop expired of a feaver. 

October 4. Was called to Thomas Hinkley's wife in travail at evening. A 
boisterous wind, and rain as I was on the way there. 

5. Sunday. At Mr. Hinkley's; her women called at 7h. evening. Shee 
was safe delivered of a daughter at 11 p. m. I tarried all night. 

12. Sunday. Bev'd Mr. Foster dlscoarst ftt>m Genesis 38d and 4th. Elias 
Crage and Hannah McKeckny Cryed [published]. 1 was called in haste at llh. 
evening, to Mr. Isaac Clark's lady in travail ; shee was safe delivered of a 
fine son and a daughter before 12; all likely to do well. 

14. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim went to Esquire Husey's to see the muster. 

15. I went over the river as far as Charles Clark's. Mr. Ballard been to 
Mr. Pollard's on public business. Our young people are there to a dance. 

17. I attended the preparatory lecter ; there were but twelve persons there 
except the Rev. Mr. Foster. 

23. Hannah left home attended on board, Capt. Agry, by Jonathan, accom- 
panied by Mr. Hains Learned, to go to Boston, f^om there to Oxford. We 
sent by her 4m. shingles, 1 crown, and 6 dollars and a half. May shee have a 
prosperous Journey, and meet her friends in safety, is the desire of her 
mammy. 

25. Met Nathan Runels who informed that Capt. Agry went Arom home this 
mom. Our men have been raising mill giers. 

27. Cyrus went to carry letters to Mrs. Loes Hiukly, to convey to Roch- 
ester and Falmoth. 

28. An old lady [Mrs. Merifiie] sleeps here. Woodward Allin here ; paid 
me 3 shillings by reducting so much due to him f)rom Mr. Ballard for his coopar 
ware. Eliab Shaw left 1 m. shingles with Burton. 

29. Mrs. Meriftie went ft*om here. 

30. Mr. Ballard been to town meeting. They have appointed a counsel. 

September 11. At Pittston (now Oar- October 30. Ecclesiastical Couicil to 

diner). dismiss Rev. Isaac Foster. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 275 

1788. November 1. Mr. Savage made me a present of a logerhead. 

2. Sanday. I stayed at home. The rest of the family went to meeting. 
Doc Whitaker performed. 

8. Clear and pleasant. Mr. Ballard went to Vassalboro. Thomas Hay- 
ward went away from here to go home. I have been at home. Tryed Jona- 
than's tallow. The death of Mr. Senter the latter part of the night. 

4. Mr. Carr here ; informed that M. Zacheos Senter departed this life very 
sndenly yesterday. 

8. Heard that Capt. Agry got to Boston last Monday. 

9. Sunday. Parthena went to Mr. Foot*s. Shee lost her pockett. James 
Springer found it, and brought it here. 

12. I was at Mr. [Thomas] SewalFs ; his Lady called me up at 4 this morn 
and sent for her women ; she was safe delivered of a son at half after six, 
evening, and I returned home about 8. Left mother and child cleverly. The 
wind blowed part of our bam of yesterday, and damaged many other build- 
ings in this town. Killed some swine. 

14. Dolly received a letter ftom Hannah of 10th inst., by Capt. Porter, who 
left Boston yesterday. 

15. Dolly gone to Mr. Hamlen's to help strike a harnis. 

16. Sunday. I attended worship, afternoon, and was called about the 6th 
hour, evening, to see Polly Savage in travail : shee was delivered of a daughter 
at 8. 

19. The counsel sett at the meeting-house. 

20. I went to Mr. Pollard's to hear what was laid before the Rev'd Counsil 
[to] examine evidence against Rev'd Mr. Foster. 

21. I attended at Counsil to hear the evidences examined. Margarett Fox 
gave a very contirary evidence concerning her working on the Sabath from 
what shee did when called in the cause of Capt. SewaU's defameing the Rev'd 
Mr. Foster. 

22. Our men rised the slip of the mill. 

23. Sunday. I attended worship. Rev*d Mr. Williams preacht, fofenoon, 
ftx)m the first of John, 2d and 6Lh verses. Rev. McLain afternoon, ftrom Jobe 
34 and 31, 32. The result of the counsel was red. I went home with Mr. 
Jackson ; his daughter Stickney was delivered at the 1 1th h. evening, of a son 
and first child. 

24. 1 came home from Mr. Jackson's. I went to Mr. Davlses and bought 
a cloak of Mrs. Anne. Paid 12 shillings. 

27. Thanksgiving Day. I did not attend worship. Parthena and Dolly 
went to Mr. Foot's, afternoon. I was called to go to Asa William's wife, in 

November 12. Thomas Sewall, who be- then assembled in the town ; he was the 

came a citizen of Farmington. See Bib- minister of the church in Now Casco from 

liography of Angnsta. his ordination in 1765, nntU his death in 

November 19. To consider the subject 1799 ; he was a native of Roxbury, and 

of divorcing the minister (Rev. Isaac grad. Harv. Coll. 1760. Alexander McLean 

Foster) and the church. was the minister at Bristol from 1773, until 

November 23. Ebenezer Williams, who his voluntary retirement in 1795. 
was a member of the ecclesiastical council 



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276 HISTOBT OP AUGUSTA. 

travail, at the 9th hoar, evening^. I went as far as the turn of the road be- 
yond the bridge this side Mr. Brawns* ; mett a message desiring I woald re- 
turn. Mr. Pitts accompanied mee home. The riding very bad. The girls 
went no fdrther than Mr. Blsbe's. 

1788. November 28. Reuben Moor*s wife and children here, moovlng ttom 
Pitts town to Vassalboro. 

80. Sunday. I attended public worship. But 27 people there. The ReT'd 
Mr. Foster's text was Romans VIII, 88, 89 verses. 

December 2. I was called to Capt Savage's to see Mrs. Ck>wen. Went by 
water. A very windy day. 

8. At Capt. Savage's and Daniel's, Junior, windy. 

4. Mrs. Ephralm Cowen ill. Called her women ; was safe delivered of a 
daughter at 8th h. p. m. and is cleverly. 

7. Sunday. I was called to see the wife of William Wing at day break f 
found her very ill; shee was safe delivered about 10th h. A. M., of a daughter 
and her first child. Jessy Bullin attended me there and home as far as the 
meeting-house. 

10. Brother Moore, Capt. Savage and Jonas Clark were here ; Mr. Dyer 
and Capt. Mathews, also ; the latter was intoxicated ; carried on very drolely 
this evening ; fell in the fire, and spilt my soap which was boiling, on him. 

11. Mr. Ballard went to Colonel Duttun's mill. 

14. Sunday. Mr. Foster preacht Arom 1 Corinth. II and I verse. 

17. Mr. James Page dined here. Informed that Mr. Bei\Jamin Branard 
departed this life last night. 

18. Mr Ballard attended town meeting. There was a vote past that the 
Rev'd Mr. Foster should not preach In the meeting-house any more. 

19. Polly Whealer was removed flrom here to Mr. Llvermore's. I went 
with her; shee was not much fatagued. Mrs. Livermore seemed sorry shee 
was brot there, but used her very kind. This the anneversary of my marriage 
84 years. John Savage threw Ephralm down on the ice and abused him. 
Snowed. 

21 . Sunday. Clear and cold. Mr. Ballard and others went to the house of 
worship, but were not sufered to enter. Then went to Rev'd Mr. Foster's. 
Had liberty of Mr. Tbwlng for Mr. Foster to preach in his house. His text 
was Genesis 8d chapter, 8th verse. 

22. Mr. Ballard and the other gentlemen who arc the roeeting-honse com- 
mittee mett at Colonel North's to settle that business. I went to Mr. Llver- 
more's. Polly [Wheeler] is decaying. 

24. There was a sleigh over sett a cumlng down the hill above our house. 
Stephen Dudly of Winthrop Aroze his hands this night. 

December 7. William Wing came here Foster) **be not allowed to preach in the 

in 1779. town's meeting-honse any longer," and the 

December 19. Jason liyermore then sexton, (Amos Pollard) was directed to 

lived on lot number two, west side,— the shut the meeting-honse door against him, 

premises now partly occnpied by Patrick as a preacher. The Ballard family stood 

Conghlin, sonth State street. steadfastly by Mr. Foster throughout the 

December 21. The town had voted that unhappy controversy, 
its recently dismissed minister (Rev. Isaac 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 277 

1788. December 28. Mr. Ballard went and put ap the publishments of 
Benjamin Prescott and Polly Hlnkly, and McAllster and Elizabeth Carver. 

80. I have been at home. We were alarmed by fire which was discovered 
at the 3d h. and 40m. this mom ; the bed on which the girls slept having by 
some means got on fire ; a chair which I slipt under the side on which Par- 
thena lay was burnt to a coal on the top of a post next the fire, and the bed 
cloaths much damaged. This is a year since I fell into the river. We barely 
escaped being consumed by fire this morning. The wisdom of God Is great 
and his tender mercy is over all his ^works. Mr. Livermore here for grave 
cloaths for Polly Whealer. 

81. Cloudy and some rain. I went to Mr. Livermore's to see Polly Whealer ; 
find her very low; sett up with her. There I closed the year, aslsting the dis- 
tresed. Births In Hallowell in 1788: 17 sons and 25 daughters. Deaths: 
males 7 ; females 5. 

1789. 

1789. January 8. I was informed by Mr. Livermore that Polly Whealer 
expired at Ih. morn. Mr. Ballard went to inform her father. 

4. Mr. Ballard went to the Rev'd Mr. Foster's to inform him that Mr. 
Whealer desires him to attend the ftneral of his daughter to-morrow. 

5. Mr. Ballard attended fUneral of Polly Whealer at 4 p. m. I got fixed to 
go, but Jonathan had wrode the horse away, which prevented me. 

7. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Livermore's to see about the expence of Polly 
Whelor's sickness and fhneral charges. His bill was £4, 18 shillings. Shee 
was , here 14 days. I attended her with nursing and some medisin. Mr. 
Ballard spint 2 days providing a place and mooving her; went to inform her 
father of her death. Our bill was 16 shillings. Mr. Page's 8 shillings. 

10. Mr. Ballard at Colonel North's settling with the meeting-house 
committee. 

11. Sunday. I was Informed that a daughter of Samuel Goodins has lately 
had a child. 

14. Sherebiah Town, and a man ftom Damscota sleep here. 

15. 8 men took breakfast. Eight persons dined. Six supt. Mr. Ballard 
attended coart. 

16. The girls wrode in a sleigh as far as Pittstown last evening. Mr. 
Wade of Jones' plantation lost his bouse by fire. 

19. Mr. Ballard at coart ; it was adjourned without day at evening. 

21. Cyrus bot 4 dozen of smelts. 

February 1. Samuel Babcock had a son born. 

8. I drest Isaac Cowen's hand at Mr. Savage's. 

5. Mr. Ballard at Mr. Page's, making rates. 

6. A bitter cold morn. I rose at 4th 8h. Was called at the 6th to see Mrs. 
Coutch who was in travail and was delivered at the 8th hour of a fine son, her 
second child, both sons. 

16. Mr. Ballard is better; the soar on his nose is broke. 

18. I was called to Mr. Brannard's wife, Winthrop, in travail, at the 9th h. 

Jaauary 16. Jones' plantation is now the town of China. 



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278 HISTORY or augusta. 

moru. Shee was safe delivered of a daughter at 5 p. m. I returned at 8, 
evening. 

1789. February 20. Mr. Ballard went to Wiscaset. My children threw out 
of the sleigh, not hurt much. 

21. Mr. Ballard returned. Capt. Belcher and Esquire Coney from Boston. 
I was called to see Mrs. Ezekiel Page in travail at lOh. and SO ra. evening. 
Shee was safe delivered of a daughter about 11. 

23. Had information by letter f^om Barton Davis of Sister Nabby*s death; 
She expired Jan. 29th. • 

24 Daniel Stevens had a son bom the 23d inst. Mrs. Dudly operated. 

25. Jacob Chandler here, informed his wife has fitts and he wisht for roe 
to go and see her. Mr. Pollard called me to his daughter Chandler at 5h. 30 
m. evening. We arived at 7h. 30m. Shee was safe delivered at the 9th honr 
of a daughter, still born. 

March 2. I was called to Rev*d Foster's to see Isaac. I put a cataplasm made 
of honey, flower, and the yolk of an egg on the soar. Was called ftom there to 
Mrs. Curaings', in travail. Mrs. Chandler expired at 2 o'clock, p. m. 

3. Mrs. Cumiugs was safe delivered at the 6th h. morn, of a son, which 
weighed 9 3-4 lbs. 

4. Shercbiah Town and Eunice Stackpole came. Eunice had a very 
severe pain in her teeth and face. I aplyed some scorcht tovr and het her face 
and she got ease. Mr. Pollard's family attended fdneral of his daughter 
Chandler and her infant. 

5. Eunis here all day. Shee had a tooth extracted. There was a young 
man had his legg cutt off at Starling [Fayette] by Doctor Williams; he brot 
it to Doctor Coney and decected it. 

8. I was called at 4 o'clock, mom, to see Mrs. Dana. Shee was safe 
delivered of a son at Ih. and 30m., afternoon. I left all as well as is usual, 
and returned about sun sett. 

9. Robert Fletcher — a daughter born at the 6th h. this mom. 

10. Mr. McNighttohave his taxes abated. 

11. I was called to see Mrs. Andrews, at 5h. p. m. Shee was safe delivered at 
8h. and 30m. evening, of a daughter. I returned at 12 perclsely by our time 
piece. Left my patients cleverly. My family were in bed when I returned. 

12. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Pollard's on public business. 

13. Called to Mr. Andros's; his infant was siesed with fltts at 11 this 
morn. 

14. The infant expired at 5th h. 30 m. mom. I put on the grave cloaths. 

15. Sunda3% The girls went to fUneral of the infant above mentioned. It 
was interred before they arived. 

17. I was called at the 12th h. to go to George Bolton's wife in travail, at 
Green Lodge. Mr. Ballard went after his horse which was lent to Polly 
Savage. I waited 2 hours and Mr. Usher came with Capt. Savage's mare. 
I sett out alone and arived safe. My anxiety was great for the woman but I 
found her safe. Shee was safe delivered of her 3d son and 4th child at the 
9th h., evening, and I returned at 2. 

22. Moses Pollard here for herbs and medisin for Mr. Hodge's child. 

23. Called at the 11th h. evening, to Mrs. Black who is in travalL 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 279 

1789. March 24. Mrs. Black was safe delivered of a fine daughter at 5h. 
and 67m. morn. I returned at 6h. evening. 

27. Jonathan hailing loggs to the mill. Robbins workt here. I have been 
combing flax. 

28. Mr. Ballard went to Andrew Goodin's for pork ; his horse fell thro the 
ice at the Hook. 

30. I was called at 2h. morn, to see Mrs. A moll at the Hook. Shee was safe 
delivered of a fine son that weighed 10 lbs. 2oz. at the 4th h. I returned at 8. 
Mr. George Brown informed me that Capt. Smith's wife had 2 children bora 
last night ; they are dead. 

81. Mrs. Hamlen safe delivered at the 5th h. of mora, of a daughter; 
weighed 9 3*4 lbs. and I left her cleverly and returned at 5 p. m. 

April 2. Hear Mr. Floyd has a son born. 

4. I was called between 12 and 1 this morn to see Mrs. Wade ; She was 
safe delivered of a daughter which weighed 9 1-2 lbs. at fhe 3d h. I returned 
at the 9th. 

5. Mr. Ballard securing loggs, the ice breaking up in the ilver. 

7. A heavy rain. The river opened and the bridge over this crick went 
away. The underpining of the north side our house fell in, but we are yet 
alive and well, for which we ought to be thankfull. Part of the dam gone 
also. 

12. Mrs. True delivered at 9th h. morn, of a son. I went back to 
Norcross*s; his wife delivered of a daughter at 11, morn. From thereto 
Capt. Porter's to Caty Scott at 12 h. 

13. Caty Scott delivered of a fine son at 9th h. mora. 

18. Called at the 3d h. mora, to George Brown's ftrom Mrs. Hussey's. 
Mrs. Brown safe delivered of a fine son at 12 o'clock. The child weighed 
111-4 lbs. I returaed at 5 p. ra. 

23. I sett out to go to Mr. Mullin's. Stept out of the canoe and sunk in 
the mire. Came back and changed my cloaths. Maid another attempt and 
got safe there. Sett out for home. Called at Capt. Coxes and Mr. Goodin's. 
Was culled in at Mrs. Hussey's ; tarried at night. A severe storm before 
morn. The new mill at Cabesy was in part consumed by fire. 

24. A severe storm of rain. I was called at Ih. p. ra. from Mrs. Hussey's, 
by Ebenezer Hewen. Crost the river in their boat. A great sea a going. 
We got safe over, then sett out for Mr. Hewen's. I crost a stream on the way 
on floting logs and got safe over. Wonderfull is the goodness of providence. 
I then proseeded on my journey. Went beyend Hainses when a lardg tree 

April 24. (1) Obed Hussey (1708-1790) settled on the road from th3 Hook to Win- 
lived at Cox's intervale, east side, opposite throp, locating at the place which after- 
Bombahook (Sheppard's Point) . (2) ward became the Peter Atherton farm ; his 
Ebenezer Hewins lived in the western part son Jonathan (1782-1829) succeeded to the 
of the town. His son James Hewins, m. homestead, and was the pioneer operator 
Sally, dan. of John and Snkey Cony, and of the Hallowell granite quarry. Jonathan 
one of their children was Charles Hewins Hains' son, William Sawyer Hains was 
of Angnsta. See John Cony's family. superintendent of burials in HalloweU 
■ (3) John Hwns (1738-1809) came with his for many years, 
family to Hallowell in March, 1785, and 



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280 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

blew up by the roots before me ; which caused my horse to spring back, and 
my life was spared. Great and marvilous are they spareing mercies, God. 
I was asisted over the fallen tree by Mr. Hains. Went on. Soon came to a 
stream; the bridge was gone. Mr. Hewen took the rains, waided thro and 
led the horse. Asisted by the same allmlghty power, I got safe thro, and 
arived unhurt. Mrs. Hewen safe delivered at lOh. evening, of a daughter. 
My cloak was burnt while there so that it is not wareable. I received 8 
shillings. 

1789. April 25. Rainy. I came flrom Mr. Hewen*8 to Mr. Pollard's. My horse 
mired and I fell off in the mud; but blessed be God, I received no hurt. Mr. 
Hewen attended me to Mrs. Hussey*s. We arrived at llh. mom. Mrs. Norcros 
was in travail ; her women w6re immediately called, and shee was safe delivered 
at 5h. 30m. evening of a fine son. Her husband and Mrs. Belino and her children 
went on board bound for Nantucket early this morn. I received 6 shillings. 

26. Sunday. Snowed. I took my leav of Mrs. Hussey and family. Came 
to Mr. Hersey's ; he and William Howard brot me f^om Fort Western by 
water. I left my patients cleverly, and found my family well. It is the 
greatest Areshet in this river that has been this many years. I left my horse 
at Mr. Brookses. 

29. Mr. Learned took a raflt of boards to Capt. Oakman. 

80. Son Town and Barton brot a rafft and sleep here ; a Tozier boy also. 

May 1. I sett out for son Town's inWinslow at 9h. 30m. mom. It rained 
by showers all day. We arived about 7 evening. 

2. Mr. Town and Barton went away with a ralft. 

3. Daughter Town called her women. I did not sleep much. 

4. Daughter Town was safe delivered at 6th h. 30m. mom. My son went 
to Fairfield for Mrs. Hannah Blossom to nurse. 

5. I left son Town's at 7th h. morn, acompanied by him. Arived at home, 
at 2 p. m. I dined at Colonel Howard's. Find my flunlly all in health, happy 
sittuation. 

6. Mr. Ballard been this day on the business of setting of Mrs. Brooks 
thirds of her late husband; Judge Howard's estate. Mr. Woodward and 
Crage with him. 

8. Capt. Haill and Sherebiah Town brot loggs. 

9. Mr. Ballard went on the business of dividing the interest Judge Howard 
left. 

11. I went to see Mrs. Burges. Shee is very ill; able to be about. I 
came home at evening. Find 10 men here, which all tarry the night; they 
are boating Colonel Haden's goods. 

12. I was called early this mora to see Capt. Hersey's lady. Shee was 
safe delivered at 7h. 30m. p. m. of a daughter, her sixth child — 4 of them 
sons. I lamed my foot going over the crick. 

14. Mr. Ballard with the others appointed to divide the estate of the late 
James Howard, Esqr. Jonathan is gone to asist Mr. Livermore raise a 
house flraim. 

May 11. Josiah Hayden of Winslow. of the one erected later by George W. 
May 14. Jason Livermore bnUt a house Perkins (1803-1877) and oocii|>ied in 1901 
on lot number two, west side, near the site by Patrick Cooghlin, south State street. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIART. 



281 



1789. May 19. Am informed that Mr. Piper and one of his children were 
drowned ; his wife and another escaped with life. Seth Williams' wife 
delivered of a daughter. 

20. Mrs. Besy delivered of a son. 

80. Arived at home at the 8th h. [ftom Wlnslow] Find Mr. Ballard lame 
in his left knee. The rest of my family well. Doctor Whltaker, Mr. Foster, 
and Esqnire Howard here. A firost this mom. 

81. Doctor Whitaker preacht In the meeting-house. Mr. Ballard attended, 
forenoon ; was so lame he was oblidged to ly on the bed, afternoon. Esquire 
Howard dined here. 

Jane 1. I applyed a poltis of bass wood to Manly 's foot, it being sweld. 
2. I drest Manly's wound ; aplyed an egg as a cataplasm and scraped horn. 
5. Jonathan went on board Capt. Getchell in company with Mr. Bullion , 
bound for Boston. 
7. Hitty Davis delivered of a son ; Mrs. Winslow operated. 

9. Rev'd Mr. Foster is removed ftom Mr. Thwing*s to the house where 
Joseph Williams formerly lived. Friend Taber takeing spruce boards ft*om 
this mill on Shereblah Town's account. Ephraim went to school. 

10. Doctor Whitaker left here very early; Mr. Learned, also, at 1 p. m. 
The latter bound for Boston, on board Capt. Agery. 

11. James Springer and Anderson Taylor tend mill this night. 

19. Ephraim was wounded in his heel by a stone thrown by Nabby Andros 
when he was after his cows. 

20. I was called at the rising of the sun to Sarah White, shee being in 
travail with her forth child, and is yet unmarried. 

21. Sarah White was delivered of a daughter at the 9th h. morn, and I 
returned, afternoon, attended by her father. 

22. I was called at 8th hour, mom, to see James Savage's wife. Shee was 
safe delivered of a fine daughter at 7h. p. m. 

28. Seth Juet Foster here, made me a present of a black silk handkerchief. 
24. Mr. Ballard and I were scited to give our deposition concerning what 



May 19. Sarah Williams, who became 
the wife of Charles Williams. 

May 31. Rev. Nathaniel Whitaker, D. 
D., (1732-1795) who had been instaUed as 
minister at Canaan (now Skowhegan) 
September 10, 1784, and founded a church 
in the parish which was left pastorless by 
the retnm of Rev. Esekiel Emerson to 
Georgetown; he was a native of Long 
Island, N. Y. ; stood six feet high, was of 
very commanding and majestic deportment, 
and great versatility of talent ; he directed 
the framing of the meeting-hoase ; he built 
a loom, made a wheel, warping bars, scam, 
spools, quills, mle, harness, sley, temples, 
drew in a web and wove it in his leisure 
hours; he was also a practicing physician 



and his medical rather than his ecclesiastical 
title was in the mind of the Diarist when 
she mentioned him. He is said to have 
been a learned and able clergyman, and 
had begun to wield a large influence among 
his people, when, after five years he retired 
from the field, and probably from the min- 
istry. When Samson Occom, the Indian 
preacher, was sent.to England in 1765, to 
solicit the royal patronage for Dartmouth 
College, Nathaniel Whitaker was sent with 
him and preached before the King. Lif^ of 
Eleazar Wheelock, first President of Dart- 
mouth College. See Chase's Hist, of Dart. 
Coll. ; Canlkins* Hist, of Norwich ; Sam- 
Bom Occom, by W. DeLoss Love, 1899. 



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282 HI8TOUY OF AUGUSTA. 

we heard Judge Howard and his widdow say about some beef he gave the 
Rev'd Mr. Foster. I was at General Lithgow's. 

1789. June 27. The Agrys had 2 vessels coine to the Hook. Brought corn. 

28. Sunday. I attended worship in public. Mr. Jonston performed. 
Capt. Stackpool called Doctor Colman out of meeting to visit Mr. Flint 
Barton*s son. Cyrus had com to grind all day. 

29. I went by Mr. Andrews' desire to see his son James who has a 
swelling on his right side ; applied a cataplasm made of the yolk of an eggf 
honey, and flower. 

SO. Mr. Flint Barton's son expired yesterday, and was Intered this 
afternoon. 

July 1. Parthcna returned ft-om Winslow. Left my daughter much more 
comfortable. Shee came by water with Mr. Joseph Town. 

2. Augustus Ballard and his mamy here this day. 

8. Went to see Llda Bisbe who is sick of a billions disorder. A vast 
concoarse of people there. I returned home at midnight. Left Doctor 
Coney there. 

9. Lida Bisbe departed this life at 7h. 30m. evening. 

10. I attended fhneral of Lida Bisbe at 2 p. m. 

11. Mrs. Wall here; her daughter went home with her; shee has workt 6 
weaks for me ; has had 1 shift and a peticoat which pays for 5 weeks' work. 
. 12. Sunday. We have no preaching. Jonathan and Burton returned at 
10, evening, fk-om Boston. 

13. Cyrus is gone to Plttstown to asist Hannah in geting home flrom 
Oxford. They arived with Mrs. Burton in company at 5 p. m. Informed me 
of the death of Doctor Conant. Our other Mends in health. 

14. Mr. Ballard, and Jonathan and Manly went to asist in puting up a house 
ftraim for Mr. Ezekiel Page. 

15. Mrs. Hamlen and Mrs. Burton here; the latter went to house keeping 
this day ; they have a room at Mr. Child's- 

22. I was called to Mr. Church the 5th h. mom. Shee was safe delivered 
at 2h. 30, p. m., of a daughter. I left her and daughter cleverly and returned 
at 4. Pitts' wife delivered of a son by Mrs. Marsh. 

25. James Wall wounded Cyrus in the forehead, with a club. 

27. Had 1-4 lb. snuff of Mrs. Weston, and a pair of cards of Mr. Black. 

29. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Daniel Stephens' surveying. 

August 2. Sunday. Mr. Parker preacht in this town. 

4. I was called to Stutely Springer's wife in travail at the 4th h. mom. 
She was safe delivered of a daughter at 3 p. m. I returned at the 7th h. 
Left my patients as well as could be expected. 

II. The fire raged at Mr. Jackson's. People went ftom here to asist. 

June 24. William Lithgow, Junior, Jonathan Ballard who was a brother of 

lawyer; office in the southwest loom of the Ephraim Ballard, the husband of the 

Fort Western dwelling. Diarist; he lived at Bowman's Point. 

Jane 28. Rev. Alfred Johnson, for six- July 14. (1) On the spot where the 

teen years pastor of the church at Free- Ivory Hayes buildings now stand south of 

port, and subsequently at Belfast. the Opera house. (2) Manley was the hized 

July 2. Augustus Ballard was the son of man. 



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MRS. BALLARD*S DIAKY. 



283 



1789. August 12. Esqairc Lovejoy and lady past by. 

14. I was called at 1 h. morn, to see Mrs. Allin; find her not very sick. 
Was called from there to Doctor Colman's lady, in travail . Shee called her 
women and was safe delivered of a fine son at 1 Ih. I was called flrom thence 
to see Mrs. Pond at Winthrop ; find her in diflcult circumstances; applied 
some remedies and gave directions and left medlsln. Left her at sun sett. 
Came to Mr. Pollard's at the 10th h. evening. Very dark and rainy as I came 
down. Had a boy with me from Hardin's. Was conducted over the river 
by Mr. McFarling; by Joseph Foster to Mr. Allin's. Find them all welU 

15. Mrs. Ailin was safe delivered at the 8th h. mom, of a fine daughter; 
and I arived safe at home at noone. I was gone ft'om home 86 hours. I went 
to bed and took a fine knap, afternoon. 

16. Sunday. I attended divine service, afternoon, tho it was with pain in 
my limbs by reason of my great fatagues the week past. 

18. I was called in the afternoon to see Mrs. Hodg who was in travail. 
Shee was safe dilivered about the IQth hour, evening, of a fine son and fourth 
child, which weighed 11 1-2 lbs. 

20. Mr. Ballard been as a evidence between Colonel Howard and Mr. 
Brooks. 

22. Hannah returned from son Town's. Left them all well as could be 
expected. Indians there. 



Aug. 12. AWal Lovejoy (1731-1810), was a 
native of Andover, Mass., and after living, 
1764 until 1775 at Pownalborongb, became 
in 1776 a settler in Vassal boro, on the side 
of the river that is now Sidney. His house 
was nearly opposite the site of the present 
Riverside railroad station. Lovejoy 's 
FeiTy, half a mile northerly, took iU name 
from him. His wife was Mary Brown of 
Charlestown. They left many descendants. 
Among the goods and chattels which Abial 
Lovejoy brought with him to the Kennebec 
were several persons of color, who bore to 
him the relation of slaves. The names of 
three were Salem, Boston and Venus, the 
two latter being man and wife having chil- 
dren. The master appears to have been 
very kind and humane, and he apprized his 
bond-people of their freedom as soon as it 
had formally become theirs by law ; but it 
is said they did not desire it, and that it 
fell to them against their liking. SaUm, 
who was verging toward the age of infirmity 
and nselessness, replied to his whilom 
owner,— "Marsr, you've bad all de meat, 
now you must pick de bones." Slavery 
was abolished in the Massachusetts juris- 
diction by the constitution which was es- 
tablished in 1780, and was so declared 



judicially on the occasion of a case before 
the Supreme Court in 1783. It does not 
plainly appear that any chattel slaves 
were ever owned in ancient Hallowell, 
although it is tradition that Samuel 
Cummings, Senior, owned one. Several, 
however, were owned in ancient Oardiners- 
ton. .Abial Lovejoy was a man of great 
force of character and influence, and he 
occupied a large place relatively among his 
contemporary settlers. He was blind for 
several years before his death. His dust 
lies unmarked like that of his consort and 
children and domestic servants in the 
family burial ground by the river on the 
ancient Lovejoy farm near the Riverside 
ferry in Sidney. Solitary among a score or 
more of forgotten graves there is now 
standing only a shattered slate slab with 
the inscription: *'In memory of Miss 
Elizabeth Milliner, who departed this life 
on 21st February, 1785, aged 66 years. Stop 
here my friends, as you pass by, 

As yon are now so once was I ; 

As I am now, so you must be ; 

Prepare for death and follow me." 
Elizabeth Milliner appears to have been a 
seamstress in the Lovejoy family, and 
Abial Ix)vejoy was a beneficiary in her will. 



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284 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1789. Aagast 23. I was called at 7, eTening, to see Mrs. Hovey, who was 
in traTail. 

24. Mrs. Hovey was delivered of a daughter at Ih. mora; and I returned 
at the 9th h. 

80. Sunday. Mr. Parker discoarst flrom Eclesiastls, 12th Chap. 1st verse. 

September 4. I was called to see Polly Savage's child in a fitt. We gave 
it mullen syrrup ; it revived and I came home. Polly Cool drowned. 

6. Sunday. The ink this is wrote with was made this day.of lake tok 
which Mr. Ballard sent to Boston for. 

7. Mr. Ballard took his departure ftrom home at 2h. p. m. on the business 
he has undertaken for this state and the Plymouth Company. 

10. I was called to see Capt. Pinkham's wife. Shee was at Mr. Wade's. 
Heft home at the 12th hour; walked under shore ; had a faint turn after I 
arived there. My patient was safe delivered of a daughter at the 9th h. 
evening. It was dead born. 

11. I went to go to Samuel Churches wife, in travail. Met a message 
which informs shee Is safe delivered by Mrs. Ingeram's asistance, andthey 
did not wish me to proseed. I returned, crost the river at the ferry and 
walkt home. 

12. Mr. Flagg informs Mr. Ballard was well yesterday. 

14. Mr. Weston raising his pott ash. Isaac Hardin's youngest child 
expired. 

17. I went to Mrs. Densmore's to have a gown tried on. As I was on my 
return crosing by the mill crick, my horse blundered and I fell and hurt me. 
Mr. Hamlen and Taylor came and helpt me home. 

20. Sunday. I was called by Mr. Medcalf to see Mrs. Sherburn who is In 
travail. Shee was siezed with her illness at the Sd h. morn. Mrs. Clearkt 
Medcalf, Ney, Hallo well, and Mrs. Sewall, there. 

22. Mrs. Sherburn was safe delivered at Sh. and SOm. morn, of a daughter. 
I took a nap of sleep which was the first since Satterday night. 

24. A Mr. Voce at the Hook cutt his throat this mora. 

26. Clear and very warm, both day and evening. Light in the north. 

27. I was called to see Grenny Coy, who is sick. 

28. I was called up at the 4th hour to go to Shaw's at the Hook; walked 
as for as Mr. Weston's, ftom there by water ; was very wet indeed. Found 
the woman safe delivered of her 2d daughter by the help of Mrs. Clark. I 
tarried till evening tide, then came up by water as far as Mr. Weston's ; then 
walkt homeward to the crick. Could not pans — the water was so much 
raised. I went back and tarried at Mr. Weston's. 

29. Our saw-mills go briskly. Cyrus went on board Daney's vessel and 
brot me some wool, 14 1-2 lbs. 

September 7. By an agreement between eighty rods east of the northeast corner of 

the Plymouth Company and the agents of Farmington. 

the Commonwealth, dated June 26, 1789, September 10. Benjamin Wade lived on a 
Ephraim Ballard was employed to snrvey lot that is now a portion of the StatePark. 
a portion of the Sandy river valley, and September 12. Mr. Ballard was survey- 
establish the northwest corner of the Ply- ing in the Sandy river valley. See entry, 
month patent— which was found to be September 7, and note. 



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MRS. BALLARD*S DIARY. 285 

1789. October 1. We had company this afternoon. Mrs. Hannah North, Mrs. 
Chever, and a Mrs. Weston from Cohors, Mr. Savage, here. Informs that 
Mrs. Foster has sworn a rape on a number of men, among whome Is — 
Shocking, indeed. 

2. I was called at the 4th h. mom, to Mrs. Ctoff, who is in travail. I 
walkt to Davis, store ; crost the river and went by land on horseback. Arived 
at the 6th h. Old Mrs. Goff returned from Boston at Ih. p. m. I tarried there 
this night. 

8. Mrs. GofTs illness increast, and sheewas safe delivered at llh. and 80 
m. mom, of a daughter. Her marm, Mrs. Bullen, Mrs. Ney, were my 
asistants. I returned home at 6, aftemoon. Find Mr. Ballard returned from 
his tower of surveying yesterday. 

4. Josh Sinclair brot us a barrel of herrin, smokt. 

6. I am informed there was a man drowned in Jones' Eddy who came 
passenger from Boston with Capt. Howard. 

6. Thee sweap of one of the mills got off the crank, so neither of them was 
tended this night. 

7. Mltty Devenport dined. Joshua Sinclare and Mr. Richardson drank 
tea. It is 12 years since I left Oxford. 

8. I was called at the 8th h. mom, to Mr. Daw's at the Hook, to his wife in 
travail. The regiment of troop convened there on Mr. Shuball Hinkley's 
land. 

9. Mrs. Daw was safe delivered at the 6th hour this mora of a fine son, 
which weighed II lbs. Mrs. Daw is the ^2d woman I have putt to bed since 
Feb'y 6th. 

10. The ReVd Mr. Isaac Foster removed to Vassalboro this day. Mr. 
Ballard is gone to the Hook. At Mr. Densmore's. Mr. Hatch went from 
here. 

11. This day is the aneversary of the ordination of the Rev'd Isaac Foster 
over the church and flock in this town three years since. 

12. I was called about 12 o'clock, mora, to John Cuming's. Arived at 2; 
found his wife safe delivered of a son, which weighed 1 1 lbs, — the 5th son 
and 7th child. Esquire Coney took breakfast here. lam informed that a 
woman of Winthrop fell in the fire and burned her to such a degree that shee 
soon expired; and at Hallowell a girl on the night of the 8th inst. fell into the 
fire, also, and her life is not expected. On the morning of the 8th inst. 
Daniel Savage's Junior oldest son was scolt very much. 

18. I was called at the 8th hour, mora, to Mrs. Stone. Shee was safe 
delivered at 5 p. m. of a daughter. This is her 2d child ; the child weighed 
8 8-4 lbs. 

October 7. Submit Davenport, then known as Sheppord's Point. The son 

twenty years of age, was a daughter of mentioned by the Diarist was Joseph, who 

Jonathan and Susanna (White) Daven- was an elder brother of John Dorr (1799- 

port, who lived on the opposite side of the 1882) of Angasta. (See Dorr family). (2) 

river from the Ballard family. Afterwards called Hinkley's plains, and 

October 8. (1) William Dorr (1767- now composing the most of the territory of 

1840) ; his first house stood on what is the Hallowell cemetery. 



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286 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1789. October 16. Charles Webber ataitchlng people's efects on acoant of 
what Mr. Foster owes him. 

18. Sanday. Mrs. Densmore delivered of a son at Ih. morn. I left them 
cleverly and returned at the 8th h. Felt mach fatagned ; have not slept but 
little since Thursday night. 

20. I hear that the wife of Daniel Savage, Junior, departed this life 
yesterday mom and is to be interred this afternoon. Wm. Hewen's son born 
the 19th inst. 

21. We are informed that Capt. Rheed is cast away on his return from 
Europe. Savage Bolton and his wife were taken with a warrant for 
breaking the Sabath. 

22. Colonel North began to build a bridge over the pond. 

2.5. Snowed this morn : the ground was covered the depth of 4 inches. 

29. Nathan Haywood's wife at Winslow was delivered of a daughter the 
26th inst. 

30. The rule which have been chosen to determine what the town of 
Hallowell should giv the Rev'd Mr. Isaac Foster reported this day that he 
should have $112.10, and Colonel Howard as treasurer has given his note on 
demand for the same with interest till paid. Mr. Foster and other gentlemen 
called here on their return home. 

November 2. Mr. Ballard bot bais of Colonel Howard for a waistcoat. 

3. I was called at 8th h. morn, to see Mrs. Palmer at the Hook. Shee was 
in travail. 

4. Mrs. Palmer was safe delivered at the 6th hour, morn, of a son, which 
weighed 10 lbs., her sixth son and 7th child. 

5. Mr. Ballard set out again on his business of surveying. 

14. Two men and a boy sleep by our fire this night. Mr. Crage crost the 
bridge with a load of hay this day. It was very light in the north — streams 
of red — it extended almost all over the whole hemisphere. 

17. Doctor Coney was called to Mr. Densmore's at Yassalboro, to his wife 
in travail. 

19. Informed that Mrs. Densmore was delivered this mom and expired at the 
second hour, mom. 

20. The remains of Mrs. Densmore interred this day. 

24. Mr. Ballard returned home from his surveying; has flnisht the job 
except planing. 

25. Joseph Stack pole, a daughter bora. 
28. Manly left here, bound for Bridgwater. 

80. Mr. Ballard went to the Hook to have his needle mended. 

December 3. I was called by Ephraim Cowen to Charles Cleark's wife in 
travail at 2h. morn. Shee was safe delivered of a daughter — (3d child, all 
daughters) at the 4th hour. 

6. The Ice run in the river. 

7. Was called at the 10th h. evening, to Mrs. Parmer in travail; was 
conducted to the river by Mr. Petingil and Mr. Ballard ; by the former, Wm. 

November 19. She was the daughter of Abial Lovejoy of Yassalboro (now Sidney) . 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 287 

Howard, and Samuel Shaw acrost the river ; then rode to Esqr. PetengaiVs. 
Mrs. Parmer safe delivered about 12 of a fine daughter, and is cleverly, except 
the cold which prevails universally- 

1789. December 8. I received butter of Esqr. Petengall's lady for pills shee 
had of me. David Pattee*s wife departed this life the 4th inst. in child bed. 
Shee left 12 children to mourn the loss. 

10. Birth of Samuel Pierce's son. 

11. Rev'd Mr. Foster called here; says his family are unwell. 

15. Mr. Ballard left home bound for Norridgewock. I have been at home. 
The ice stopt by Fort Western. People crost ft-om this crick by water. 

16. People crost the river on a cake of ice which swang round from the 
Eddy, east side and stopt at the point below Mr. Weston's. 

17. The river is open against our field. E. Davis crost with a horse by 
confineing two cannoes together. 

18. Mr. Ballard returned Arom Canaan. 

19. Mr. Hamlen here, setlng glass. Levy and Reuben Moore here to 
purchase timber. 

21. Dolly set her web to work; it was drawn too narrow in the harness. 
Shee cutt it out, drew it in again, and wove. 

22. The ice moved at the fort. 

25. The ground covered with snow about two inches deep. 
28. Capt. Weston of Canaan came here to help Mr. Ballard plan. 
. 29. Mr. Ballard and Capt. Weston went to Esquire Coney's this mom. 

30. I was called at about Ih. morn, to sec Mrs. Brooks who was in travail. 
I rode to Mr. Pollard's landing ; Mr. Ballard acompanied me and took the 
horseback. I walkt from there to Mr. Brooks' ; was much fatagued ; found 
his lady in a deplorable situation, but by the blessiug of providence 1 put her 
safe to bed at the 3d h. the living mother of a fine daughter. I came home by 
Capt. Hersey's. Walkt acrost the river and got home safe. Left Mrs. Vose 
there as nurs. 

31. Births in Hallowell in the years, 1785. Males, 17; females, 22. 
1786. Males, 24 ; females, 26. 1787. Males, 20 ; females, 28. 1788. Males, 
17; females, 25. 1789. Males, 27; females, 27. Total 232. 

31. Deaths in Hallowell in the years, 1785. Males, 4; females, 6. 1786. 
Males, 4 ; females, 5. 1787. Males, 9 ; females, 7. 1782. Males, 7; females, 
5. 1789. Males, 3 ; females, 6. Total. 56. 

31. [1789]. I have put 14 women to bed with sons and 24 with daughters. 
In 1790 were males born in Hallowell, 23; females, 19. Deaths, males, 10; 
females, 5. [1790] I have extracted 34 children in this and other towns, of 
which 20 were males, females, 14. 

December 18. Now Skowhegan. land surveyor and a forceful and locally 

December 28. Samuel Weston (1757- prominent man; one of his danghters 

1802), a son of Jossph Weston who was a married Joseph Baker, Senior, and was the 

pioneer settler on that part of the original mother of Henry Knox Baker (1806-1902), 

territory of Canaan which is now in Skow- of HaUowell, and Joseph Baker (1S12- 

hegan ; he was a farmer and trader and 1883) of Augusta. 



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288 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1790. 

1790. January 1. Mr. Town was kickt on his knee by a hors at Mr. Pollard's. 

2. The ground is almost bair. I was called at 3d h. p. m., to Robert 
Rnnel's wife ; shee was safe delivered of a daughter at 5, and I left her com- 
fortable. Walkt home. It was lOh. evening, when I returned. I rode Capt. 
Weston's horse out a little beyend Mr. Brown's. Walkt the remainder of the 
way. Heard them call for help before I arrived. Death of Mr. Sherbum at 
4h. morn. 

8. Sunday. I am informed that Joseph Fletcher expired this day, at lib. 
morn. 

4. Mr. Sherburne interred. 

5. Mr. Ballard is at Doctor Coney's this evening. Mr. Fletcher interred. 

6. Mr. Ballard returned at evening. He has been at Capt. Sewall's this 
day, doing writing on the plans. 

8. Mr. Ballard went to the meddow ; ftom there to Mr. Foot's, and brot 
home 5 pecks of wheat which Jobe Springer left there for my asisting his 
wife in travail November 6, 1786. Son Town came here. Informs that his 
dear babe fell on the hand-iron and burnt its face. Luke Barton cutt his 
knee. 

10. Sunday. I am informed that the Rev*d Mr. Moore preacht at the Hook 
this day. 

11. Isaac Savage brot me a fire pan, tongs and poker, price 12 shillings. 

12. Clear and blustering. The Coart setts in Hallowell. Doctor Whltaker 
and son. Esquire Lovejoy, Rev'd Mr. Foster, and Mr. David Smyle sleep here. 

21. I went to Mr. Beaman's at Uh. morn; shee was safe delivered of a 
daughter [Sarah Sturges] at the 5th h. evening. 

22. Oliver Cobnrn killed by a tree this evening. 

26. The girls makeing Hannah a rapper ; shee hurt her foot and fainted. 

29. I was called to Moses Se wall's wife in travail at Ih. morn. Shee was 
delivered at four of a son. 

February 2. I was called to Isaac Savage's early this morn. Shee was 
delivered of a son at 3h. evening. Dr. Whltaker and son slept here; his horse 
fell down bank ; our men helpt him up again. 

7. Sunday. I Wcis called to Isaac Hardin's ; rode on horse back. 

8. Terrible cold and windy. I was at Hardin's. Thomas Davis had a son 
born ; Mrs. Hinkley operator. 

4. Very cold. Mrs. Hardin was delivered at the 5th h. of a daughter. 
Foster ftroze his feet. 

11. I was called to see Hannah Davis. Delivered her of a son that was 
dead. First born. Shee continues in fltts. I left her at sun sett. 

12. Parthena spilt a lamp of oil on Mr. Ballard's Jack-coat. 

Janaary 22. Oliver Colbam located have become Bond and Water stieeta to 

here in 1787. the meeting-hooM and ferry. There wu 

February 2. The road from Yassalboro, the same precipitons northerly bank of the 

west side (now Sidaey), then led to Jones' brook at Mill street as at the present time, 

brook by way of the present Mill street ; and the diary records several accidents at 

it crossed the brook on a bridge that that point like the one which happened to 

spanned the pond made by the dam, and Dr. Whittaker. 
then wound drcnitouBly by way of what 



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MRS. ballabd's diart. 289 

1790. February 18. The water flows over the ice, makes l^arci crossing 
the pond. 

15. Parthena went to nurse Mrs. Foot who was delivered of a daughter 
the night past. 

16. I was called at the 5th h. to see the wife of Leut. John Shaw ; shee 
was safe delivered of a fine son at the 7th h. I returned at the 11th. I lost 
a mitten. 

17. I was called to see Bei^'amin Prescott's wife. 

18. A remarkable pleasant day. I put Mrs. Prescott to bed at 5h. 80m. 
evening, with a fine son. I left her in hopefUU slrcumstances. 

28. I was called by Harshorn Coney at Ih. mom, to see Capt. Belcher's 
lady In travail. Shee was safe delivered at A hours and 55m. of a very fine 
son which shee calls Hyrum. The Captain was absent; left home, bound for 
Sandy river, yesterday morn. I returned at the 11 hour, attended by Samuel 
Coney. This is Mrs. Belcher's 4th son and 8th child. 

26. I attended a lecter at the meeting-house, afternoon. Rev. Mr. Eaton 
and Parson Emerson performed. 

27. I was called at Ih. mom, to see the wife of Henry Badcock. Mrs. 
Tolman and I spent th% day with her. 

28. Mrs. Badcock called Mrs. Blsbee at Ih. p. m., and was safe delivered 
at 4, of a daughter, — her fifth child, the first a son. 

March 4. Was called after sun sett to see Mrs. Bolton ; shee was safe 
delivered at midnight of a fine son, — her 8d son, and 4lh child. I left her 
cleverly and returned home at 4 o'clock. 

6. Went to Colonel Sewall's to get his lady to make me a bonnet ; was in- 
formed by Mr. Redlngton that Luke Barton's life was not expected. 

9. Old Mrs. Hart Interred this day ; shee expired the 6th Inst. 

11. I was called at the 6th hour this mom, to see Mrs. Walker at the Hook. 
Shee wassprigh about the house till 11. Was safe delivered at 12h. and 15m. 
of a fine son. Death of Luke Barton; he expired at 11, evening. 

12. Doctor Williams was called to see Phlle [Phllena] Petengail ; he re- 
turned and sleeps here. Informs his patient has got the shingles. 

14. Mr. Barton's fnneral attended at Ih. p. m. this day. 

15. Esquire Coney returned flrom coart. 

19. Foster and Ephralm gone to Mr. Andrew Goodwin's for hay. 

22. I was called to see the wife of Jedediah Prescott of Winthrop, at Ih. 
p. m. by Stephen PuUen. He was 2 and 1-2 hours from home till his return 

Febrouy 23. Supply Belcher (1751- company of militia and achieyed the title 
came to the upper settlement of of Captain which he afterwards bore. 



Hallowell In 1785, bat remoYed to the Febniary 26. Rev. Samnel Eaton, the 
Sandy river plantation (now Farmington) minister of Harpswell, and Rev. Ezeklel 
In 1791 ; his son Hiram, mentioned \xy the Emerson, the minister of Georgetown. 
Diarist, became a lawyer l^ profession, and March 19. Andrew Goodwin, a settler 
a member of the 30th Congress (1847- in 1780, lived on the east side of the Ken- 
1848) ; he m. Evelina, dan. of Jason D. nebec (in the present town of Chelsea) op- 
Cony. See family of Samuel Cony (1718- posite the month of Kednmcook stream or 
1803). While living in Hallowell Supply Sheppard's point. 
Belcher became an officer of the North 

19 



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290 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

with me. The good lady was safe delivered at lOh. of a fine son and her 10th 
child. I tarried all night. 

1790. March 23. I came ftrom Mr. Prescott's after breakfkst. Mett Mr. 
Ballard on his way to Unity to survey the river. I arived at home at noon. 
Mr. Prescott dined here ; he let me have 6 pecks of rle for my aslting his lady. 
I am informed that Mrs. Mason expired the 21st Inst., and her remains 
were carried to Vassalboro for interment this day. 

25. James Smith took half a bushel of com out of our mill last night of 
George Bolton's and my sons. 

29. At Mrs. Cragg's. Mrs. Braley delivered of a daughter. 

80. I was called to Andrew Qoodin's, his wife in labour. Was called to 
Cragg's again at midnight. 

81. Mrs. Gregg's illness increast, and shee was safe delivered of a very 
fine daughter at 2h. dOm. p. m. I left her as well as could be expected, and 
returned to Mr. Goodwin's at evening. 

April 1. At Mr. Goodwin's. Am so much overcome with my illness and 
fatague I am but Just able to walk the room. 

4. Sunday. Mrs. Goodln was safe delivered of a fine son at 18 o'clock, 
and Is cleverly. 

5. Capt. Sewall, Carr, and Goodln chosin to the oils of select men. 

11. Sunday. Rainy. I was called to see Mrs. Cragg, who Is exceeding ill. 

12. Doctor Coney was called, plainly told the family Mrs. Cragg must die. 
Shee accordingly did expire at lOh. evening, without the least struggle. Mrs. 
Pollard and myself and Mrs. Voce put on her grave cloaths. 

18. I tarried at Mr. Oragg's, and asisted what I was able. The corps were 
coffined and sett in the west room. 

14. Returned to Mr. Cragg's. The remains of his lady were interred at 4h. 
p. m. As many people attended as could be expected as the traveling Is bad. 
Deacon Coney made a prayer on the ocaslon, and gave good exortation. I 
tarried this night. 

15. Mr. Cragg conducted Sally White home; he went and called Mrs. 
Hamlen to take his dear little infant, and give it suck. Mr. Ballard came in 
and informed me I could not pass the brook below Mr. Savage's, and I tarried 
all night. 

16. Mr. Cragg attended me home. Mr. Ballard had a fall which hurt him 
some this day. 

March 23. Unity was the early name of tholomew Nason (1784-1858) who was for 

the township which was incorporated as many years a merchant of Angosta. The 

New Sharon in 1794. harial of the body of Mrs. Craig was 

April 12. Mrs. Craig was a daughter of probably on her ande Joseph North's land 

John McKechnie and his wife Mary who where later the town house was erected 

was the daughter of John North (1698- (now the Joseph Anthony homestead lot, 

1763), the captain and sunreyor, who was No. 77, Winthrop street) ; the pall bearers 

the son of John North, the immigrant were Henry Sewall, William lathgow, Jr., 

ancestor of the North families of Angosta. William Howard, Dr. Daniel Cony, Wm. 

The infant bom two weeks before the sad Brooks, and Dr. Samoel Colman (Heniy 

event of its mother's death, was Hannah Sewall's Diary). 
Craig who became the first wife of Bar- 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 291 

1790. April 17. Mr. Ballard is gone to measare the road flrom this side Mr. 
Cragg*s to the top of the hlll North of here. I am Informed Capt. Reed is 
arived with a large quantity of com. The river opened as low as Mr. Llver- 
morc*8. Mr. Jones crost at Pollard's Ferry with his hors and 2 cows. 

19. Mr. Pollard informed me of the death of widdow Sherburn's daughter 
and only child. 

20. Mr. Ballard and Foster gone to a meeting of the proprietors of the 
township called Unity, at the house of Mr. Carr. Neighbor Savage informed 
mc that the Rev*d Isaac Foster's lady was safe delivered of a daughter last 
evening and is cleverly. 

21. Samuel Smith here for sastenance for his father who is sick. Samuel 
Cumings, Junior's son drowned. 

22. Rev. Mr. Foster here. David Pollard and Mr. Sprague brot loggs to 
our mill. 

23. Mr. Dexter here — informs that Biah Town is wasting fast, that Nathan 
Hay ward is mending and that a woman in their new plantation expired in 
child bed last Lord's Day. Elisha Mathews had a son drowned at his logg 
landing as they were rafting loggs. 

24. I am informed that a Mrs. Cragg of Wlnthrop departed this life the 
week past. There was a drowned lad taken up at the Chopps In this river. 

26. We were informed that Mr. Pollard had broke his legg this mom. Son 
Town is cnming with loggs ; our men gone to meet him. Mr. Stratton, son 
Town and Robinson Dexter dined here. 

23. Son Town went as far as Mr. Chamberlin's, returned by reason of the 
Btorm; sett out again after we dined. 

29. Vessels arrived in the Eddies here. 

30. Mr. Ballard gone to survey for Mr. Purklns at Yassalboro. On his re- 
turn, Informs sister Moore had a son born lately. 

May 1. I went to see Bei\]amln Brown's lady; find shee was gone to Mr. 
Woodward's. I went there and saw her ; shee is very unwell, seems much 
dejected on account of being so far distant from her parents and other Mends. 

2. Sunday. Polly Bisbe and Betsy Chever at Mr. Hamlen's. They with 
Mrs. Burton went to Mrs. Cragg's grave. 

3. Mr. Ballard at town meeting. Daniel Coney, Esqr., chosen to repre- 
sent the town at the General Coart. 

4. Cyrus to George Bolton's for him to cum and help Jonathan who Is very 
unwell. I am attempting to swett him which seems to relieve him some. 

5. I was called to Benjamin Porter's by Mr. John Cumings. We arived at 
8h. 30m. ; he was 3 hours from home when we arrived. Mrs. Porter was safe 
delivered at the 10th h. evening, of a fine son and second child. 

9. Sunday. I was called between 12 and 1 o'clock, mom, to see Mrs. An- 
drews. I walkt. Was much fatagned. Shee was safe delivered at 3h. 34m. 
morn, of a son, a small, weak babe. Mrs, Mathews delivered of a daughter 
this evening. 

> April 26. Hezekiah Stratton (1746- William M. Stratton, clerk of courts for 

1834), who came from Ck>noord, Mass., to Kennebec county 1844-1880, (See Stratton 

the Kennebec and settled at Winslovr in family) was a grandson. 
1768. He married Eonice Hayward. 



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292 



HISTORY or AUGUSTA. 



1790. May 10. Mr. Ballard went to Winthrop to survey land for Samael 
Foster. 

12. Mr. Ballard been to Colonel Howard's, and to the Hook. The freshet 
is up. 

17. Mr. Ballard went to lott out the township oif Unity [New Sharon] this 
day. 

18. I was at Mr. Hinkley's ; his wlffe called her women and was safe de- 
livered at sun sett of a daughter. Her oldest daughter in her 15th year; shee 
has 7 sons and 2 daughters. 

19. I returned home by water as fkr as Mr. Weston's. Capt. Howland 
came up [the river] this day. 

21. Friday. Joseph Preskott had a daughter lost In the woods Wendsday 
last, and is not found yet. 

22. Cyrus and David went to seek Mr. Preskott's child [daughter] that 
was lost. It was found alive. Seth Pitts wounded him yesterday. 

28. Sunday. I attended public worship, afternoon. A gentleman by the 
name of Tylar fk*om Uzbridg performed. 

27. Was called at the 9t;h h. p. m. to see Moses White's wife. Went by 
water as far as the brick kills ; then walkt the other part of the way. Shee 
was safe delivered between the 11th and 12th hoari, evening. 

29. Mr. Mathew*s son was found floating on th3 wat3r at the Hook this 
mom by a man belonging to Fairfield. Interred at Colonel North's burying 
place. 

June 1. Esquire Coney sailed for Boston this afternoon. 

5. Mrs. Mash [Marsh] and Mrs. Page here. The Old Lady informs me 
shee has extracted 756 children in the coars of her practice. 

6. Sunday. I was called by Mager Stickney at half after two this mom; 
his lady was safe delivered of a daughter at 6h. evening. 

10. They were flreing a cannon tiiis evening below here. My sister Debby 
Davis interred. I got the news 24th Inst. 

15. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. Thwing. 

16. Echobod Pitts informs his brother is very poorly with his wound. 



May 23. Probably Royal Tyler (1770- 
1826), then a theological student; ordained 
at Andover, Ct., in 1792 ; died at Salem, 
Ct., April 10, 1826. 

May 29. On the lot that is now the 
homestead of Fanny Anthony at the north- 
westerly junction of Elm and Winthrop 
streets. 

June 3. Mrs. Marsh was the principal 
neighboring midwife north of the field 
occupied by the Diarist, and had been in 
practice mach longer than the latter. She 
was the wife of John Marsh (1717-1802), 
a pioneer settler of ancient Yassalboro (in 
the part that is now Sidney) . His grant of 
land was dated, ^'Boston, the 24th day of 



June, A. D., 1763." He built in 1763 a 
saw and grist-mill on the east side of the 
river road where the latter crosses the bog 
(or Catler or Hastings brook,) near the 
place of the now abandoned Lovejoy ferry. 
June 15. Nathaniel Thwing, who was a 
tailor, and went from house to house mak- 
ing garments as his services were accepted. 
On the 15th of February, 1790, he was at 
Henry SewaU*s making for him a coat and 
waistcoat, and on the 18th of the same 
month Sewall wrote in his diary that 
'*Jadge Thwing," the father of Nathaniel 
and a judge of the Common Pleas fOr. 
Lincoln county, **called and lodged with 
ns, and his son finished my clothing.*' 



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MRS. BArjLARDS DIARY. 



293 



1790. June 17. Mr. Foster sleeps here. Informs that Esquire Hassey 
departed this life yesterday, at 7h. p. m. in prison. 

18. Burial of Esquire Hussey. 

21. Mr. Ballard went to the Hook to a meeting of the Proprietors . of 
Unity. Calvin Edson was drowned in this river this night ; he attempted to 
cross and it is supposed he fell asleep and fell over board. 

24. We received a letter flrom Brother Barton of the ISth Inst., which 
informs that my dear sister Debby Davis departed this life the 8th. and was 
interred the 10th. Shee has left a husband and seven children to mourn the 
loss. 

26. Mr. Town and Bf rs. Barton went to Judge Boman*8 office ; shee took 
administration on her late husband^s estate. Mr. Edson was drowned 21st 
inst., and taken up this morn. 

28. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Carr's to a meeting to chuse Juriors. Mr. 
Carr and Mager Goodin chose for Grand Jury; Capt. Page and Andrew 
Goodin for petty, etc. 

80. Brother Ebenezer's infant deceased this day. 

July 4. Mr. Seth Williams drank tea here. 

5. Capt. Stackpool [of Winslow] here, — informs that Sherebiah Town 
expired last evening, between 11 and 12 hours; he is to be interred to-morrow ; 
the Capt. allso informed that a Mr. Lues was killed by a limb falling of a tree; 
that a man at Penobscott hanged himsef and another at Boston shott him- 
self. 

6. I left home early, bound for Pownalboro; Mr. Ballard, allso. We 
went on board Leut. Pollard*s boat ; stopt at Pitts town ; got to Mr. Hatch's 
where we took lodgings during the coart's setting. Went into coart, after- 
noon. 

11. Sunday. At Pownalboro. Went ftrom Mr. Hatche's after meeting to 
Mr. Rider's at Eastern river. 

18. We came to the coart house. Saw Melone receive the punishment 
which the coart inflicted at 8 hour mom; then returned to Mr. Hatche*s. Paid 
our reckoning and sett out for home. I wrode Mr. Pollard's horse. We 
dined at Mager Smith's. Called at Mr. BuUin's and Mr. Jackson's. Arived 
home near sun sett. 

18. Old Mr. Pitts drank tea here. 



June 17. Obed Hassey lived on the east 
side of the river nearly opposite Sheppard's 
point. On April 6, 1789, the town meeting 
approved of "a road from the river by or 
near Esquire Hnssey's honse to the east- 
ward across the intervale to the foot of the 
hill, till it comes near to Mr. Andrew Good- 
win's bam, then eastward to the county 
road." (Town records, p. 78.) 

June 21. Calvin Edson, who came from 
Cape Cod in 1781, and last occupied a farm 
that was afterwards owned by Allen Lam- 
bard, in the present fifth ward. Mr. Edson 



was the first to introduce twitch or witch 
grass into the town ; he obtained half a 
bushel of the seed in Massachusetts, and it 
was thought to be very valuable because of 
its vitality,— its power to resist frosts. 
Edson said he had "got something that 
wonld not winter kill." 

Jane 26. Jonathan Bowman, judge of 
probate for Lincoln county, from 1772 until 
his death in 1804. 

July 13. Flogged at the whipping post. 

Jaly 18. Seth Pitts, Senior. (See Pitts 
family.) 



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294 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1790. Jaly 27. Mr. Ballard and I, Mr. Pollard and lady, and Mrs. Hodge's 
went to Mr. Bullin*s ; had what cherries and currants we wisht for and other 
handsome entertainment. Mr. Walker's son expired this mom. 

29. Caton was married to Sally Chandler. 

81. Attended lecter, afternoon. Mr. Emerson performed. 

August 1. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and the girls attended worship. The 
Church of Chester and Hallowell received the sacrament of the supper; and 
as many as had consented to the result of the late Counsel and could consent 
to the articles of faith the above mentioned church have slned, were invited 
to join, in receiving the ordinance. 

8. Mr. Reed called me to see his wife. I arived there about sun sett. Mrs. 
Woodward, Ingerham and Williams were asistants. 

4. Mrs. Reed was safe delivered of a son and her second child (both sons) 
at sun rise. 

18. Mr. Ballard and Hannah went to lecter. Mr. How performed. 

15. Sunday. I went to meeting, forenoon. Colonel Sewall made the first 
prayer, and red a sermon In Mr. Flavil's works. Deacon Coney made the last 
prayer. 

22. Sunday. I attended worship in public this afternoon. The service 
was performed by Mr. Cornwill. 

23. Mr. Ballard sett out for Unity, on the business of lotting out the town 
ship. Juet Foster with him. 

25. I was called this evening to see Mr. Samuel Norcross' wife who is in 
labour. 

26. My patient was safe delivered of a son at six o'clock, evening. 

27. I returned by water with Mr. Andrews. The canoe lekt. I wet my feet. 
September 1. Mr. John Jones and Stephen been here this day. 

15. Called to see Mrs. Hains ; shee was safe delivered at the 10th hour, 
evening, of a fine daughter. I tarried all night ; my patients cleverly ; this is 
her nth child, 6th daughter. 

23. Called to see the school. Was called to Mr. Burton's, his wife in 
travail; shee was safe delivered of a son and first child at 11 o'clock, and is 
cleverly. 

October 2. A Mr. Warrin of Vassalborough sleeps here ; he is firom Roch- 
ester last May. 

October 8. Mr. Oilman returned from surveying ; left Mr. Ballard well 
yesterday. 

4. David went to meet Mr. Ballard with the horse ; met him at Esquire 
Farewell's; he went on to Winslow. Mr. Ballard arived at home at noon; 
then went to town meeting. 

Angnst 22. Waite CornweU, a native September 1. John Jones, the ex4ory 

of Connecticnt, who had lately been ii- and refugee revisiting his former home, 

censed to preach, journeying for his health ; September 23. The son bom was James 

the next year he spent several months with Burton, Jr., who became a printer and 

the church of New Gloucester, and his publisher, and was the father of Joseph 

preaching caused a great religions awaken- Burton (1822-1861) who was register of the 

ing in that town (Greenleaf's Ecclesiastical court of probate for Kennebec county from 

sketches). 1854 until his decease. (See Barton family.) 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 295 

1790. October 6. Called to see Capt. Has8ey*s lady, in laboar. 

7. Capt. Hassey'8 lady was safe delivered of a son — her first bom — at 1 Ih. 
mom. I retnmed to Mr. White's at 4 p. m. Tarried all night. Left my 
patients cleverly. The new bora InAint weighed 10 lbs. 

9. Mrs. White was safe delivered of a son at lOh. mom. I tarried with 
her till 4 p. m., then went home by water. 

12. Mr. Ballard came from Mr. Page's left his spectacles ; went back for 
them. I was called to see Mrs. Edson's infknt who is extreamly ill. Tarried 
and watcht. 

18. At Mr. Kennady's. Doctor Coney came to see the child; ordered 
blisters and left senna and some drops. 

14. Mr. Chamberlain called me to see a wonnd his daughter Polly had on 
her right legg. I drest it with lint and spirit. I was called in great haste to 
see Mrs. Hamlen who was in a fltt. I walkt there. Applyed vinagar to her 
lips, temples, and hands, and onions to her feet, and shee revived. Mrs. 
Edson's infant expired last night. 

15. f aneral of Mrs. Edson's child. 

16. I have been to dress Polly Chamberlin*s wonnd. Carried ointment I 
made of mellolott. Colonel Sewall here this evening. 

18. Mr. Fellows of Unity slecpH here. 

19. Mr. Ballard gone to preambulate the line between Hallowell and Yas- 
salboro. 

21. Was called at 9h. evening, to Mr. Snell's, his wife in travail. 

22. Mrs. Snell was safe delivered at 9h. evening, of a daughter, her first 
child. 

26. John and Peter Jones and Capt. Hussey dined here. 

27. A very hard frost this morn ; the ground remained froze all day. Mr. 
Ballard, Gillman, and Thomas Stickney left here at the 11th h. mom, on a 
surveying tour at seven mile brook, loting settlers' lots. 

28. Hadlock was executed this day. John Trask expired. 

80. Mrs. Shaw and daughter returned from the westward. John Trask 
interred. 

November 1. Mr. Jones left here after dinner; his men waited for the tide 
to take out boards which he had here. Mr. Williams Informs me that Mr. 
Taylor's house fell down this mom, but thro good Providence no one re- 
ceived any hurt. The family were removed to the house where Mr. ('ottle 
lived. Polly was brot in her bed on a sled. 

October 28. Thursday, 28th, ult. was moved from there to Moiint Desert about 

executed at Pownalboro, porsnant to his nine years past, where he lived till the 

sentence, Samuel Hadlock. He uniformly perpetration of the crime for which he was 

denied to the last, having murdered one executed. — Botton GazeUe, November 

Gott; said his witnesses accused him ISth, 1790. 

falsely; but found no fault with the court November I. The Elias Taylor house 

or jury. The first time turning off, he on lot twenty-one, west side. It was the 

fell, owing to the slipping of the rope ; he birthplace of the first white child bom 

•gain ascended the ladder and was exe^ within the limits of ancient Hallowell 
cnted. He was originally from Cape Ann, 






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296 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1790. November 4. The saws go briskly. Mr. Rawson workt for Jonathan. 

6. We were greatly alarmed this morning with fears that my little son 
[Ephraim] was drowned crossing the mill pond. He was sent to Mr. Sav- 
age's but mistook his <1irections and went to Mr. Childs. Mr. Jones was here 
this day ; his man Richardson sett out with his raflt ; got hicht on a rock and 
returned ; tarries for the night tide. 

7. Sunday. I attended public worship. Deacon Coney made the 1st 
prayer ; Esqr. Petengil the last, forenoon ; Colonel Sewall the 1st, afternoon, 
and red Doctor Dodridge's Discoarses; Mr. Livermore, last prayer; but few 
attended. Richardson went fk*om here with his raflft. 

10. My girls had some neighbours to help them quilt a bed quilt, 15 ladies. 
They began to quilt at 8h. p. m., flnlsht and took it out at 7, evening. There 
were 12 gentlemen took tea. They danced a little while after supper. Be- 
haved exceeding cleverly. Were all returned home before the 11th h. 

18. A clear and beau ti Ail day. Mrs. Sewall was ill till 3h. p. m., when 
shee was, thro Devine asistance, made the living mother of a living son, her 
8d child [Charles]. Mrs. Brooks, Belcher, Colman, Pollard and Voce, assisted 
us. I went to Colonel Howard's at evening, to ask assistance for Polly Tay- 
lor. Colonel Sewall gave me 6 shillings, 8 pence as a reward. Conducted me 
over the river. I called at Mrs. Cragg's. Was informed that Hannah North 
was thot to be expireing this mom, but is revived. Mrs. Colman informed 
me that the Doctor, her husband, gave Hannah a dose of calomel for worms 
which gave relief; shee went next day to see Mrs. Goodin and took cold 
which has brought her into the sittuation shee now is. When I arrived home 
found Capt. Silva Learned here ft'om Oxford and letters. Jonathan killed his 
oxen. 

14. Betsey Howard sent some things here for Polly Taylor, — wine, sugar, 
apples, bread and fine Unning raggs. 

« 19. We had to hoist gates to prevent the foundation of the bridge fh>m 
fluting. I made 11 1-2 dozen candles. 

22. Muddy walking. I went to Mr. Weston's, hot for Polly Taylor with 
money which Mr. Jackson gave for her, 1 lb. rasons, 1 quart molasses, and 28 
bisquit. 

23. Seth Foster workt here; moved fence on the point south side the 
crick. Death Jery White's infant. 

25. The public Thanksgiving. My girls went to Mr. Hamlen's. Jonathan sett 
out for Long Reach with a raflt of boards, this evening ; Mr. Wall with him, 
with boards for Capt. Davis. I am informed that Samuel Foster of Winthrop 
had the misfortin to break one of his leggs last Saturday, and is thot to be in 
danger of loosing his life. Asa Mason and Hannah Cowen married this day. 
The ice runs in the river. 

26. I am informed that Jonathan and others who were attempting to go 
down with a rafft, were inclosed by the ice at Bumber Hook Point. The ice 
makes very fast. Doctor Williams and his son her^^^ evening. Could not 
pass with the horses ; left them here and went :;o I^fr. Pollard's. I was called 
at 8h. evening, to see Mrs; Ezra Hod^er- tn labour; her women were called, 
and see was safe delivered at lO^^^and dOm. evening. Mrs. Pollard being 






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MRS. BALLARD*8 DIARY. 297 

unwell did not arlve till the moment the child was born. The ladies who as- 
sisted took supper after all our matters were completed, and returned home 
about 12. Mrs. Pollard and myself tarried all night; sett up. Mrs. 
Hodges rested finely ; the infant, also ; 3d daughter and 5th child. The 1st 
was 6 yrs. old the 10th of September last. The ice stopt at Fort Western. 
Samuel Davis fell thro the ice as he was attempting to go off the rafft to the 
shore, but was saved by their getting to him with a cannoe and takeing him 
in. 

1790. November 27. The river is closed, and I saw men pass over on the ice 
about 8un rise. Horser and cattle crost our mill pond on the ice this day. 
Jonathan and Mr. Wall returned home at evening. 

30. I was called at the 7th h. mom, to Ephraim Cowon's wife, in labour; 
shee was safe delivered at 9, evening, of a son. 

December 3. I was called at the 6th h. mom, to see Mrs. Asa Williams ; 
shee was safely delivered of her 4th daughter at Ih. p. m. Mr. Ballard re- 
turned f^om his tour of surveying. 

8. Mr. Foster and Ephraim went to Mr. James Hinkley*s for four sheep, — 
the first we have owned this 14 years. 

10. I was informed that Andrew Goodin's youngest child expired the 6th 
Inst. 

12. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Pollard's to carry a plann to be conveyed to 
Capt. Weston of Canaan. 

17. Samuel Foster's legg amputated, afternoon. Old Mrs. Prescott*s arm 
cutt off this morn. 

18. Dolly is unwell, took soap pills ; had several fainting turns. I went to 
see Polly McKethney ; find her very low in strength and spirrits ; Doctor 
Colman let blood in both her feet ; I was called at the 8th h. evening, in haste 
to see Mrs. Benjamin Brown ; shee was safe delivered at 9h. 30m. of a fine 
daughter, her 7th child. Mr. Brown was absent. Death of Polly Taylor. 

19. Jonathan attended funeral of Polly Taylor. 

25. Mr. Putnam of 7 mile brook took breakfast here. Snowed all night. 

27. I was called at lOh. evening, to see the wife of Shuball Wicson ; met 
with a differculty on the way beyond Mr. Burjises. Came back to his house; 
he went with us. I arived safe. 

28. Capt. Buijes called me ftrom Wicson's, before sunrise, to his wife, in 
travail ; shee was safe delivered of a daughter at sun sett. 

29. I arived home by 10, mora. Hannah's ta,ce is not so badly scalt as we ' 
expected. Shee spilt boiling licour on her foot this day and scalt it, some. 

30. I was called at the dawn of day to Wicson*s ; found his wife suffering 
for want of help. Shee was delivered of a son the 8th h. ; the infant, I was 
fearful! would expire, but revived, and I left mother and child cleverly. 
Arived at home at 12 o'clock. 

31. Doctor Williams went to see Capt. Page. I went to Mr. Cragg's. 
The close of the year. 



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HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1791. 

1791. Jaauary 4. Doctor Coney here; took account of births and deaths the 
year past from my minutes. 
5. Mr. Hallowell, the tinker, dined. 

9. Sunday. Mr. Pollard here. Informs that Moses is returned fh>m the 
woods with a wound on his hand. 

10. Mr. Wicson here this mom for advise ; his wife being in dangerous 
circumstance. I sent her a steptic powder, which he gave her; it gave relief. 
I went myself; left her something to take. Phinehas Pane, a daughter born. 

12. Mr. Tltcom took breakfkst. Dolly seems not so well. ^ Doctor Coney 
here, left her some bitters. 

16. I was called -to Samuel Cumings', to his wife in labour. Shee was 
safe delivered of a daughter at Ih. 80 m., about 5m. before my arival; his 
parents with her, and no one else. 

17. Hear that Esquire Coney's lady was delivered of a daughter this mom 
at lOh. 

18. Cumings and Brown had their case tried ; the Jury brought In in favour 
of Cumings. 

23. Sunday. Mr. Ballard came ftom Mr. Bust's at Sandy river this day. 

24. Mr. Ballard been to the Hook, to a meeting of the proprietors of 
Unity. 

26. I was called at day dawn by Mr. James Black, to see his wife. Shee 
was delivered at 7h. 13m. mora, of a fine son. 

28. I was called by Mr. Field to go to see Mrs. Caton, at Ih. morn ; walkt 
there; was almost overcome when I arived. I put her safe to bed with a 
daughter and her first child, at 3, and returned home at 7 ; her husband not at 
home. I was called at 8 to see Capt. Buijese*s little son who was scalt on his 
left arm y ester morn. I drest the arm. 

30. Mr. Ballard and Jonathan attended worship at the coart house ; Mr. 
Smith of Winthrop, performed. Thomas Kenny called me at llh. to see his 
wife. 

81. Mrs. Kenny delivered at 9th h. mom, of a daughter. 

February 3. I was called at 9 this mom to see Mrs. Welch who was in 
labour. Shee was delivered at 12 of a daughter, deadbom. I was then called 
to Thomas Hinkly's. 

4. Mrs. Hinkley was delivered about Ih. mom, of a fine son. I left her 
comfortable at 8, and returned home. 

5. I went to see Esquire Coney's lady ; find her a little more comfortable 
than shee has been. 

6. Sunday. Blackman called me to see his wife*s sister. I had a fall out 
of the sleigh on my way. I received no hurt. Gave the lady some senna and 
manna with seeds and left her an ounce of elezer of proprietatis. 

January 23. Simeon Rubb, shoemaker which "was more convenient in stormy 

and farmer, a settler on lot fifteen at Farm- weather than the meeting-honse, as it 

ington in 1783. woald admit of fire." (Henry SewaU's 

January 30. Rev. Eliphalet Smith. By Diary.) Smith again preached here in the 

reason of the inclemency of the weather February and March following, 
the services were held in the ooort-hoase, 



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MR8. BALLARD'S DIARY. 299 

1791. ' Febrnary 8. Mr. Ballard went to see that Mrs. Welch had wood ; 
made her a shovel, &c. 

9. Mr. Ballard carried some wood to Mrs. Welch. 

12. I was called by Mr. Crane to go to see Mrs. Pond of Winthrop. Went 
as far as Mr. Samuel earnings'; was there informed the lady was safe 
delivered by Mrs. Whiteing of a daughter. I returned home at the 11th h. 
morn, attended by Mr. Eastman. 

18. Mr. Densmore came here for me to go and see his little son who 
remains in a low state ; his thigh is sweled as much as when I saw it before. 
I recommended their apply to some person of skill for the safety of the child. 

16. Mr. Walker of Quickbrook sleeps here. 

17. Mr. Allin here. Informs his youngest child is scalt. Peter Jones 
here. 

18. I was called by Mr. Greely to see his lady who was in labour, tnd was 
safe delivered at lOh. 30 m., evening, of a fine daughter — her 7th child, of 
which 4 are daughters. 

20. Sunday. I attended public worship. Mr. Smith performed. Mrs. 
Peirce send a bill for prayers. At Mr. Thomase's. I was called at 9h. evening, 
to see Lent. David Pollard's wife who was in labour. 

21. Mrs. Pollard was very ill thro the day. Old lady Fletcher, Mrs. 
Pollard, and Ephraim Cowen's wife aded to our company, and my patient 
was safe* delivered at 9h. evening, of a fine daughter, and is cleverly, 
considering how ill shee has been. 

22. Frederick Foot, his wife and sister here on their way to Mr. Bullin's. 

23. Mr. Foot and the ladys here as they returned. 

24. Received a letter Arom Sister Waters of Jan'y 26th ; Hannah one of 
Jan*y 1st, together with shee and Dolly each of yarn — a cap which was my 
honored mother*s. 

25. I went to Mr. Savage*s to see about my saddle irons. 

26. Mr. Ballard gone to the Hook on business relating to Unity. 

28. I have been at home ; spent part of the day clearing the platform of 
ice, some kniting, and part perrusing the newspapers, — one of which informs 
of the death of Uncle Thomas Kidder. 

March 1. Capt. Gretchel was here, — ^^ informs me his brother the mager, is 
at the point of death with a cancer which has broak out in as much as a 
douzen places on his body. 

6. Benjamin Bisbe's daughter Sally expired the 3d inst. and was interred 
this afternoon. 

6. Sunday. I attended worship all day. Mr. Smith performed ; took his 
text in John 1st c. and 1st v. There was a tM meeting. 

9. Mrs. Benjamin's daughter [Polly] cutt her middle finger of her right 
hand off; they sent for me ; I went twice to see her this afternoon. 

February 22. Frederick Faught who Frankfort (later Pownalboro, now Dres- 
was a pioneer settler of YasMlboro (now den). Frederick Fanght had a son Fred- 
Sidney) ; he was a son of Philip Fanght erick, who was the father of Marlboro P. 
who was an immigrant settler in 1751 at Fanght, an Angosta grocery merchant. 



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300 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



1791. March 11. I went to Mr. Savage's and doctered the little girl's 
hand. Mr. Ballard been to Esqaire North's on a reference. 

14. Mr. Stephen Jones and his brother, Peter's lady, dined and took tea here. 

15. I was called at 6h. 1-2 p. m. to see Mrs. Benjamin. Shee was safe 
delivered at 10, evening, of a lusty son. 

16. Echabod Pitts and wife and son here. 

17. One of Jonathan's oxen dropt down and expired instantly about sun-sett, 
as Ephraim and John Savage were bringing a load of wood down this crick. 

21. Josiah Ketth informed me that Mrs. Pierce expired this mom. Mr. 
Ballard is gone to the Hook to a meeting of the proprietors at Unity. 

22. Ephraim with his teem attempted going onto the crick to load some 
boards which belonged to Mr. Hnmlln; his steers brok thro thee ice, and we 
had a very great surprise. Mrs. Welch, Mr. Cragg, and Wing, came to our 
assistance, we relieved the teem and they were all saved, but what I 
underwent with my fatague was very severe. 

24. The petitioners of Unity drew the lotts this day and Mr. Ballard re- 
turned home at eve. 



March 24. On the 17th of Decamber, 

1777, an association was formed at Hal- 
lowell by HalloweU,Pittston and Topsham 
explorers of wild lands, known as "The 
Proprietors of a Township on Sandy 
River." The association afterwards be- 
came known as that of "Reuben Colbnm 
and his Associates." Mr. Colbnrn who 
lived in Gardinerston (now Pittston), had 
came to Maine from Dunstable, and was 
the Major Colbnrn who accompanied Gen- 
eral Arnold in his ill-fated expedition to 
Quebec in 1775, being in command of the 
company of carpenters and axemen who 
formed a portion of the army. At another 
meeting of the associates, held July 28, 

1778, at Amos Pollard*s inn. Fort Western, 
after the choice of a clerk, treasnrer, and 
a committee of three persons, it being 
understood at the meeting thnt the town- 
ship of Sandy River would fall within the 
limits of the Kennebec patent, this com- 
mittee was instructed to open negotiations 
for a grant to Colbum and his associates of 
a township on Sandy River, the west line 
of which should be fifteen miles from Ken- 
nebec river and parallel thereto. It does 
not appear that the committee made any 
progress in obtaining the grant during the 
year ; and at another meeting held at Pol- 
lard's on the 24th of May, 1779, the com- 
mittee was instructed to make further pro- 
posals to the Kennebec proprietors, and if 
possible obtain the grant of the township. 



It appears by an agreement made at 
Boston on the 4th of October, 1779, and by 
a subsequent amendment to this agree- 
ment made March 3, 1780, by and between 
James Bowdoln, Daniel Jeffries, James 
Hewing, and John Hancock, on the part of 
the Kennebec proprietors^ and by the com- 
mittee on the part of Reuben Colbum and 
his associates that Colbum and his asso- 
ciates on their part should cause a survey 
to be made of the township of Sandy river. 
Mr. Colbum and his associates employed 
Joseph North to make the survey and a 
plan of it. Among the early Hallowell 
settlers who were associated, with Reuben 
Colbum were : 
Samuel Bullen, N. Blodgett, 

Adam Carson, Peter Corbett, 

David Cowan, Ephraim Cowan, 

James Cowan, Oliver Colbum, 

Jon'an Davenport, Nathaniel Da\is, 
Joseph Greeley, Seth Greeley, 

Robert Kennedy, Simeon Paine, 
Joseph Savage, Eliab Shaw, 

John Shaw, Emerson Smith, 

Edward Springer, James Springer, 
Ellas Taylor, Nathan Weston, 

Morris Wheeler. 

A few of the above named settled per- 
manently on the Sandy river, and disap- 
pear from the subsequent history of Hallo- 
well. The Records of the association are 
not known to be in existence. 



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MBS. BALLARD'S DIART. 301 

1791. March 29. I was called at 7h. morn, to John Coatche's wife in labor. 
She was delivered of a daughter before I arrived there. I (Irest the infant. I 
was informed this day that a sister of Mrs. Neys has lately murdered herself. 
Mrs. Hinlkley performed for Mrs. Contch. 

31. Capt. Hersey called me at the 6h. mom to see his lady who is in 
labor. She was safe delivered at 6h. 80m. p. m. df a fine son. 

April 1. I took breakfast and sett out for home, crost the river on the ice. 
The river opened at4h. p. m. 

8. The freshet high. Mr. Pollard and Savage here to see about the bridge ; 
informed us that Mr. Voce has saved the most of his boards. 

7. Death of Mrs. Gardner, Plttstown. 

9. I was called at the 1st h. morn to see Capt. Norcross* lady who was in 
labour. I arived there at 2h. Shee was safe delivered at 5h. of a daughter 
which weighed 9 1-2 lbs. 

10. Sunday. Jonathan killed a rabbit and sent It to Mrs. Nabby Hodskins 
who is unwell. 

11. Mr. Cragg is finishing the bridge over the mill-pond. I was called at 
10h.» evening, to see Mrs. Dany who is in labor. I went by land. Death of 
Mr. Fletcher. 

12. Mrs. Dany called her women at Sh. mom, and was safe delivered of her 
4th son at 4h. 1-2, and is cleverly. Mr. Ballard and Cyrus gave up their 
possisson here to Peter Jones. We are informed that Old Mr. Fletcher 
expired last night. Mr. Woodward, his wife, Mr. Brown, and his, and her 
brother here ; poor woman Is in a distrest state of mind ; they have compelled 
her, as shee says, to go to her father's, which seems much against her will at 
this time. May God restore her to comfort of mind. 

18. Mr. Ballard attended funeral of Mr. Fletcher; he was interred at 4h. 
p. m. My girls cleaning the house and preparing to remove. 

14. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim went to plough the gardin which we are to 
improve. The bridge over the crick was finisht covering this day. 

18. Sunday. Mr. Ballard went down with part of our fhrniture. 

20. I have been at home fixing to remove. Mr. Ballard carrying down our 
efects. 

21. We removed ft*om the mills to the house which was Old Lent. 
Howard's, and Peter Jones went to the mills with his family, Mrs. Savage 
and Polly helpt me. 

28. Capt. Lathrop went up with a sloop this aftemoon. Mager Getchel 
expired this day. 

24. Sunday. We are informed that Mrs. Goold was to preach. 

25. I was called at lOh. mom, to see Mrs. Cottle. Arived there at Ih., p. m. 

April 18. Removing .to the Lieutenant was built, and most of the residue of the 

Samuel Howard farm. lot westerly as far as the highway is now 

April 21. (1) Lot number one, west comprised in the farm of Patrick Congh- 

ilde, adjoining Hallowell. The river end lin, South State Street. (2) River lot 

of the lot was severed by the railroad loca- numbared one, west side, next to the pres- 

tion near where the Howard habitation ent Augusta and Hallowell line. 



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302 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1791. April 27. Mrs. Cottle was safe delivered at lOh. mom. of a fine daughter. 
Returned by way of Colonel Dattun*s ; the road very bad. Josiah Manley 
here. Cyrus went to tend mill for Mr. Robinson. 

80. Cyrus came here firom Mr. Robinson*s at Vassalboro where he has been 
to tend mill since Wednesday last. 

May 7. Esquire Coney heve. Ephraim went to Mr. Jonese's ; brot a hen and 
chicks ; she hatcht 16, — eleven of then perisht for want of proper care. 
Juet Foster here, directly from the westward. 

8. Sunday. Capt. Davis' brigg and two other vessels went up this day. 

10. Nabby Shaw expired at 8h. p. m., 

11. Mr. Shaw*8 daughter interred, afternoon. 

12. At Mr. Moore's. 
IS. Mrs. Moore 111. 

14. Mrs. James Moore called us up at 2h. mom. Shee was safe delivered at 
2h. 80m. morn, of a flue daughter — her fifth child, — and is cleverly. I 
returned home accompained by Mr. Mortgain. The town mett yesterday and 
chose Daniel Coney, Esquire, to represent this town. 

15. Cyrus and Ephraim sought the young cow's calf; found it dead, and 
drove thee cow home. 

17. Dolly wrode down to Capt. P. Brown's, and up as far as Mr. Weston's 
this morn. 

19. Mrs. Livermore and I went to see Mrs. Doctor Coney who is very 
poorly. 

20. Mr. Livermore and his sons here, planking seller. Capt. Howland 
went down this afternoon with his sloop. 

12. Sunday. Mager Keath here. Mr. Fields informed that Kabbj 
Hodskins is very low indeed. 

28. I went to see Nabby Hodskins after I had wed one onion bed ; find her 
very low. I tarried ail night, and watcht. 

26. Was called upon and went and put the grave cloaths on Nabbj 
Hodskins. 

27. Mrs. Sally Stackpole went flrom here. Cyrus waited on her by water. 
I went to the Hook ; bot needles, pins, and combs. Borrowed Mrs. Carr's 
side saddle. The death of Lent. Nechol's lady of Oxford. Shee expired April 
U, 1791. 

28. We had a sprinkling of rain about sun sett ; showers went round us, 
and thunder and lightning. Nabby Hodskins interred at 2 p. m. 

29. Mr. Ballard and Cyrus went to meeting. A Mr. Emerson performed. 
We were much alarmed about Ephraim ; the circumstances was this : he went 
up chamber, laid down on some bed cloaths, and fell asleep. We went to 
Mr. Llvermore's and Mr. Kennady's to seek him ; I had looked on every bed 
and found him not. A thought turned in my mind to search again, and found 
him asleep. 

30. Mr. Ballard been surveying road by Mr. Jonese's. 

81. I put Robert Fletcher's wife to bed with her 4th daughter, at 30 m. p. m. 



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MKS. BALLARD'S DIAKY. 



303 



1791. June 8. Mr. Ballard gone to survey for Mr. Gilley. Mr. Haywood 
and Mr. Hurd took tea here. 

6. Sunday. I was called at Ih. morn, to see Mr. Ezekiel Pace's lady who 
was in labour, and was safe delivered of a son at the 6th hour. 

6. Mr Ballard went to Esquire North*s as an evidence. 

9. I was at Eliah Shaw*s ; his wife was safe delivered at 8h. this mom, of 
a daughter. Came with speed to Alvin Ney*s who was there after me at 7h. 
this mom. I arived at Ney's at the 11th h. ; his wife was safe delivered at 2h. 
dOm., afternoon, of a son. 

10. Lucy and I went to see old lady Coney; dined with the Doctor's lady. 

11. Mr. Thorp, came for his shirts which Dolly made. 

12. Polly Livermore and my girls pickt strawberys. 

18. I have been at home, made 18 dozen candles. Cyrus run 18 Spoons. 
Mr. Ballard niakeing planus of Unity. 

19. Mr. Ballard, myself and Cyrus attended public worship. The Rev'd 
Mr. Little of Wells, performed. The text, forenoon, was Luke, 10 : 20 — 
But rather rejoice that your names are written In Heaven; afternoon, the 42 
verse, — One thing is need full. 

20. Ephralm was choping, and a chip struck my face which hurt me much. 
I apply ed camphor. Mrs. Davenport here. 

21. Esquire Coney called to see Dolly; recommends her takelng port 
wine. 

22. Mr. Ballard went to Wiscasset. 
28. Mr. Ballard returned. 

24. I have been to make a syrrap for Mrs. Livermore. Mr. Ballard been to 
his land at the uper end of the town. 

25. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Carr's; received 6 shillings for a plan of 
Unity. 

27. Mr. Adams, the printer, and another gentleman with him putt in here 
by reason of the rain ; tarry all night. 



June 3. Daniel Heard was a shoemaker 
at the Hook ; he lived on the east side of 
Second street near where the railroad 
crosses it (Lowell's crossing). Heard's 
lane took its name from him. He was a 
noted gardener. His wife was a daughter 
of Josiah and Elizabeth Paul of Kittery ; 
he came from Wells to Hallowell in 1798. 
In the Hallowell cemetery are the Inscrip- 
tions: "Daniel Heard, died Angnst 28, 
1844, agsd 77 years, 1 month.*' "Sacred to 
the memory of Elizabeth Heard, consort of 
Daniel Heard, who died Marcli 31st, 1821, 
aged 60 years." 

Jane 19. Rev. Daniel Little was or- 
dained to the ministry and installed over 
the second parish of Wells in 1750, and 
continued his pastoral relation with the 
chnrch there for nearly fifty years. 



June 20. Epitaphs* in the Hallowell 
cemetery : (1) "Mr. Jonathan Davenport, 
who died February 26, 1810, in the 79th 
year of his age. He removed from Dor- 
chester and settled in Hallowell, Oct. 25, 
1762." (2) "In memory of Mrs. Susanna 
Davenport, consort of Mr. Jonathan Dav- 
enport, who died Septembdr 1, 1818, in the 
85th year of her age. 

June 27. This was probably Isaac 
Adams (1774-1834), then a young practical 
printer working his way through college. 
He graduated from Dartmouth in 1796. 
In 1797 he opened a school at Portland, and 
soon afterward became one of the early 
publishers of the Eckatem Argut, 



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304 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1791. June 28. Mr. Adams and his brother left here after breakfast. 

29. Son Town came here. Informs hts wife was delivered last Lord's day. 
[June 26th.] 

80. Mr. Adams and Sprague hear who presented an Election Sermon to mj 
daughter for her daddy. 

July 1. Deacon Coney's house raised. 

3. Sunday. Rev'd Mr. Judson performed : he discoursed, forenoon, from 
Jobe Ic, Iv. ; afternoon from Luke c. 41. 

4. Mrs. Livermore wove her own handkerchief here. Mr. Ballard at 
Esquire Coney's this mom ; helpt Mr. Densmore — fhdming and raising his 
house fraim. Independence observed. 

5. Mr. Ballard went to the Hook to survey for Capt. Smith of Wasington. 

6. Mr. Ballard left home bound for seven mile brook. My girls altered 
their hatts into bonnitts. 

7. My girls went to Mr. Bullins by water; his sons waited on Hannah and 
to survey. Dolly tarries all nfght. 

10. Sunday. Ephraim and the girls went to meeting by water. I wrode, 
afternoon. Mr. Judson dlscoarst ftom 2 Timothy, 4c., 7 and 8 verses. 

11. We cleared our well this day. 

12. Mr. Ballard and Ephrnim gone to rafft boards and take to the Hook for 
Mr. Stanley. We used the last water our well aforded this day. Mr. Ballard 
and Ephraim gone up after a rafft which paid of cuming out of the crick the 
forenoon tide. 

IS. A shower, afternoon ; some halll here ; a considerable damage done by 
it at the fort. Mr. Ballard got his boards down. 

15. Mrs. Welch helping Dolly draw a piece of huckaback. 

16. Mr. Ballard returned Arom coarst. Barker imprisoned for defaming 
Polly Noble. 

19. Nathaniel Norcross married to Eunice Hodskins. 

22. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim went to seek our canuoe ; found it and brot 
it home. 

28. Mr. Fields has kept our young horses pounded ever since Monday 
mom. 

24. Sunday. John Gardner and Arthur Lithgo, Esquires, called here. 

27. Mrs. Livermore pnting web into my loome. 

80. Mr. Ballard brused his leg a hailing timber ; I applyed camphere ; he 
attended lecter, afternoon. Ingraham's daughter born. 

August 7. Sunday. Juet Foster Is publisht to Hannah Thompson ; another 
couple, also. 

8. My daughters washt at the river; dryed and ironed. 

12. I was called a little before night to see Asa Mason's wife. 

IS. I am at Mason's still. Went and gathered blackberries. Mrs. Mason 
was safe delivered at lOh. of a son. We tarried thro the night. ' My patient 
is cleverly. I had no sleep this night. Birth 18th. 

July 1 . Afterwards known as theTohey July 24. John Gardiner of Pownalboio, 

house. It was toni down in 1882 or 18S3. a son of Dr. Sylvester Gardiner, and the 

July 5. The town of Moont Yemen maternal grandfather of Llewellyn M. 

since 1792. lithgow of Augusta. (See sketch.) 



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MRS. BALLARD S DIARY. 



305 



1791. August 15. Master Eaton and Mrs. Livermore drank tea here. 
17. Mr. Ballard attended a meeting of the church, afternoon. 
20. Mr. Ballard surveying for Ebenezer Church. 

23. Jonathan helpt kill 8 bares by Mr. Abram Page. 

24. I was called at 5h. 30m. evening, to see Samuel Badcock's wife ; 
arlved at 7 ; shee was delivered of a line son at 10. I tarried all night. 

25. I was called at 8 to see Mrs. Ney; shee was safe delivered at Ih. p. 
m., of a son. I tarried till near night. 

26. Mr. Ballard at the Hook ; bot 1 quire paper. 

27. I was called by Isaac Hardin at 4 h. mom ; his wife delivered of a 
daughter at Ih. p. m. I went directly from there to James Savage's; my 
horse mired in a swamp and I fell off; arlved at Savage's at 3; find her safely 
delivered of a fine son by his marm*s assistance, were ftesht and went back to 
Hardlns' by Col. Dutton's farm. 

28. Jonathan went to a Baptist meeting; saw 9 persons receive baptism. 

29. Mr. Ballard been to Mr. Vahn's. 

September 1. I was called by Esq. Juett to see his lady at Ih. p. m. arlved 
at 2. Shee was safe delivered at 3 of a daughter — her 8th child — the number 
of sexes are equal, Mrs. Dearburn, Bradstreet, Shaw, Berry and Lang 
attendants. I wrode home alone, arlved at 9 eve. The hors pestyred me but 
I got safe thro. 

4. Mr. Ballard and I and sons attended divine services. The Rev'd Mr. 
Farroh of New Ipswich, performed. Peter Grant and Nancy Barker, Thomas 
Norrls and Mary Shepherd, publisht. 



August 16. Schoolmaster. 

August 28. Rev. James Potter (d. 1816), 
one of the pioneers of the Baptist denom- 
ination on the Kennebec, was then preach- 
ing and exhorting in the town and some of 
its outer neighborhoods. The substantial 
results which attended his labors was the 
formation of the earliest Baptist church 
in Sidney,— first known as the Second Vas- 
salborongh Church. The persons baptized 
on this occasion were probably amon^ the 
original members of that church. 

September 1. Jedediah Jewete (1749- 
1823) of Pittston (now Randolph); he 
lived opposite Bowman's point. 

September 4. (1) Peter Grant (1770-1836) 
was the son of Samuel Grant (1740-1805) 
who was a native of Berwick, and became 
a captain in the revoluitionary army ; after 
the war Samuel Grant came to the Kenne- 
bec and located at Gardinerston ; he re- 
moved later to Yassalboro and improved 
land which afterward was known as the 
Samuel Redington farm; he finally re- 
moved to Clinton where he died ; he had 

20 



been the pioneer in the lumber operations 
on the Sebasticook, and he furnished the 
first masts for the frigate Conatituiion, 
launched at Boston in Octobor, 1797 ; his 
dust is in the Episcopal church-yard at 
Gardiner. Among the children of Peter 
and Nancy (Barker) Grant was Samuel 
Clinton Grant (b. 1797) who married 
Elizabeth Frances Vanghan, the youngest 
daughter of Dr. Benjamin Yaughan ; their 
daughter Ellen married John Otis of Hal- 
lowell; another child — William Sullivan 
Grant (b. February 18, 1825) married (1) 
Betsey L. Josselyn of Augusta (See 
Josselyn family), and is living in Gardiner 
in 1901. (2) Thomas Norris, a trader; 
he built and lived in the four-story house 
still standing on Second street in Hallo- 
well, opposite the cotton factory, which was 
occupied as a boarding house many years 
while the factory was in operation. He 
owned a packet sloop, Catherine* On the 
last of November, 1813, the sloop sailed for 
Boston, having for passengers Mr. Norris 
himself, Mr. Ring (another trader), John 



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306 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1791. September 6. Mrs. Livermore and I went to help Mrs. Shubal 
Hlnklej quillt abed quillt. 

6. Mr. Dingier came here when we were at breakflist, to hurry Mr. 
Stratton; they sett out directly for to go on board Capt. Springer, bound for 
Boston. I sent 6 shillings by Mrs. Stratton to purchase me some 
carabrick. 

7. Mr. Ballard has been surveying for Mr. J. Jones. Cyrus tending mill 
for P. Jones. 

8. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. Martin at the Hook. 

10. Cyrus went to Pittstown, took posession of the gristmill. 

11. I went last night before midnight to John Badcock's, his wife being in 
labour. A message came there at lOh. this mom for me to go and see Mrs. 
Sherbum, shee being in labour also. I could not leave my patient. I 
delivered her of a fine son at Ih. p. m., and returned home. Walkt two miles, 
came by water to the rock, and walkt A*om there. Cyrus went to Pittstown; 
carried his bed and chest. A child of Seth Williams wounded it self in the 
body yesterday. Mrs. Sherburn delivered of a daughter. I have helpt 4o8 
children into existence in this eastern country since the year 1777. 

14. A letter ft-om brother Collins of Aug. 28, informing my ftlends are all 
in health. Am happy in hearing glad tidings ftom my firiends at so greatt a 
distance. Refk*eshing to hear of the health and prosperity of my dear 
connections who are hundreds of miles from me. 

15. Mr. Ballard and Ephralm went over the river, forenoon; to Mr. 
Densmore*s afternoon ; he removed into his new house. My girls have been 
makeing roe a pair off staise. 

16. Dolly had a tooth extracted by Mr. Livermore. 

17. Mrs. Livermore and Mrs. Densmore here; I went home with the 
latter ; their chimney up to the ridgepole. 

18. Sunday. Mr. Ebenezer Davis of Charlestown, and Halns Learned, 
sleep here. Mr. Davis informs that sister Barton got to bed with a son 
before he left Oxford. 

20. Jack Livermore cutt his ankle, — took a piece of bone off. 

21. My girls had a quillting; got out one and partly quillted another. 
Thee gentlemen and ladys danced in the evening. 

Newell, and a young lady by the name of Newell clang to Miss Hovey and held her 
Naomi Hovey. The two latter were in- to the rigging ontil life was extinct. Mr. 
tending soon to be married, and were on Newell, Captain Bowman and the crew 
their way to Boston to purchase their wed- sarvived, thongh badly frozen, and after 
ding and housekeeping outfits. On the 3d several day's suffering were rescued and 
of December, at sea, was encountered a carried to Boston, where Mr. Newell ling- 
gale of wind, the vessel shipped a sea ered a short time,and died from the effects 
which filled the cabin, and became water- of the exposure and depressed spirits. The 
logged and unmanageable. The passengers sad event cast a gloom of sadness over the 
and crew were obliged to make themselves town of Hallowell. The Rev. Mr. Oillet 
fast to the rigging to avoid being washed preached a touching disoonrse on the occa- 
overboard, and Mr. Norris, Mr. Ring and sion, in the old South meeting-house. 
Miss Hovey perished with the cold. Mr. September 11. The Mile-rock. 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 307 

1791, September 22. Mr. Densmore called me early this morning to see 
his wife. Shee was safe delivered of a daughter at 3h. p. m., and I returned 
home at sun sett. 

25. Sunday. I was called to see Mrs. Wliite at 4h. p. m. Shee was safe 
delivered at the 7th h. Thee infant a feeraale. Mother and child cleverly. 

27. I took breakfast with Mr. Hamlen. Dined with Mr. Burton. Drank 
coffeewith Mrs. Child. Called at Mr. Pollard's and Weston's. 
" October 3. Ephraim went to school. 

4. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Brown's for his mare ; had her bled In the 
month; shee bled all the way home and continued to bleed an hour or two 
after coming home; we at length filled the incision with fur, and it ceast. 

7. Jonathan went to Green Lodg. 

8. Mrs. Porter informs me Capt. Fai*nham*s lady deceast Sept'r 28th. 
Shee was at the westward. 

9. Esquire Coney informs me Mrs. Goodin is nearing the close of life as he 
thinks. 

10. Mr. Walker called me at 2h. morn, to Benjamin White's wife in 
labour; shee was safe delivered at the 7th h. of a daughter. 

11. Thee moon eclipst this evening. 

18. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Hardin's to prepare for giting a mill stone 
from there ; Ephraim went also. 

15. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim been to git a mill stone ftrom Mr. Hardin's 
to the river. Mr. Keneda and Savage Bolton helpt them. 

17. Mr. Ballard went to Pitjstown with a mill stone. 

18. Mrs. Sherburn's infant was interred. 

19. Mr. Ballard surveyed land that Mr. Pollard sold to Esquire Williams. 
Doctor Coney removed to the Hook. 

20. My daughters went to Winthrop to attend the wedding of Richard 
Foster and Clarrissa Barton. 

22. Ezra Town lefb here this morn, homeward bound. Ephraim went and 
carried him on horseback as far as Mr. Wall's. 

23. Sunday. I was called to see Sally Pierce at 9h. morn; the riding very 
bad. 

24. Sally Pierce was safe delivered at Ih. p. m. of a fine son ; her illness 
very severe but I left her cleverly. 

25. I was called to see Mrs. Tubs. She removed to Thomas Hinkley's to 
be sick. 

26. Mrs. Tubs was safe delivered at lOh. 3m. of a daughter. 

80. Sunday. I was called to Doct. Colman's at 3h. morn ; his lady safe 
delivered of a fine daughter at llh. 40m. Mrs. Dummer and Sewall attended 
her with me. 

81. I returned home by water; am informed that Mrs. Goodin departed 
this life 29th inst. She has left an husband and 7 children to bewail the loss; 
parents, brothers, and sisters, also. May God give them the sanctifying grace 
to mourn aright. 

October 7. Later called Green Lodge, then Tillson's comer, and now West Sidney. 



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308 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1791. November 5. The ice runs at the Fort; stopt at Cobese. 

6. Sanday. Moses Pollard informs that Shaw, the Sheriff, has taken a 
Doctor Johnson by virtue of an advertisement for forgery. 

7. A Mr. Moore of Green sleeps here. 

8. I am informed that the wife of Mr. Andrew Goodin expired last night 
at 11th h. also that the wife of Mr. Wiman at Jones* plantation [China] 
lately deceased in child bed. 

9. I was called at dh. mom to see Mrs. Wasson ; she was safe delivered at 
4h. 89m., of a fine son [James], Mrs. Pollard, Duttun, and Hamlen assisted. 
She and child cleverly. Mr. Ballard sett out for to explore the countiy back 
of Fort Halifax, imploy*d by this commonwealth. 

10. I have spent but one whole day at home since Oct. 23d. The remains 
of Mrs. Goodin were Interred this day. 

14. Mr. Dany called me early this mom to see his youngest child who is 
burnt on his face. I went and made an ointment and drest it. 

16. Dolly went to Mr. Densmore*s to learn the taylor*s art. I wish her 
success and happiness. 

16. Was called to see Mrs. Wasson ; I find her as well as could be expected, 
but of the mind shee cannot take care of her infant at home — a stupid afair I 
think — but shee must do as shee pleases. 

17. This day observed as a Public Thanksgiving. Mr. Eaton drowned. 

18. After taking breakfast laid down and slept; but watchings are very 
fataguing to me at this time of life. Mr. David Jackson lost at sea ; his vessel also. 

19. The wife of Mr. Edward Springer of this town was interred this day; 
shee departed this life the night of the 17th inst ; her infant interred with her. 

21. The ice was stopt here at morn, moved again at evening. Had a 
smart rain in the night which opened the river. 

22. The gentlemen who were chosen as referees in the cause between 
Peter Jones and my son Jonathan sett this day ; they gave Jones £8 damage, 
and the cost of court was £2 and 5 shillings. I could wish my son might 
learn to govern his temper for the fhter. 

23. Mr. Town and I left our house at 8h. this morn ; we were put to some 
difficulty at the ferry, but got safe over at llh. and arlved at Mr. Town's at 
6h. evening. 

24. Cloudy. My daughter Town was seised with her labour; and shee 
was safe delivered of a daughter at lOh. evening. This is her 8th child. 

26. Death of Mr. Hewin's infant. 

27. Sunday. My son and I sett out to come down; called at Capt. 
Grant's ; shee came home ftom Charles Jackson's. Informed me that his 
daughter Jane was delivered of a son at lOh. this mom. We came to Mr. 
Pollard's ferry. I was conducted over. My son turned back for home. I 
tarried at Mr. Pollard and watcht with Betsy Heuston who is near the close 
of life. 

November 18. David Jackson was the and anc3rtainty, were committed to Jason 
town's oollector of taxes. His uncollected Livermore for collection, 
tax bills, in which there was great confusion 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 



309 



1791. November 28. I was called by Mr. Webber of Pittston to see his 
wife; she was safe delivered at lli. p.m., of a daughter, and is as well as could 
be expected ; her children have the cough. Betsy Henston expired at 6h. 
evening. 

29. Jonathan was out on a raft last Thursday night; a very severe storm. 
We are informed that Mr. David Jackson of this town was unfortunately 
drowned between here and Boston on the 18th inst ; his vessel and cargo 
lost. 

30. Mr. Ballard, myself and Jonathan attended fUneral of Betsy Heuston 
who expired at her Uncle Pollard's ; shee was Interred at 4h. p. m. 

December 1. Mr. Ballard went to Esquire Coney's, forenoon ; to the Hook, 
afternoon, to lay out a burying place and meeting house spot which was 
given by Mr. Charles Vahn to the town. 

2. Mr. Ballard been to the Fort and Hook ; is gone to the Fort again to 
meet the select gentlemen. Requested an order for what is due to him, from 
this town ; they did not grant it, but paid him 40 shillings in part of account. 

4. Sunday. Cyrus informs that Mr. Lameroy of Pownalboro was drowned 
by his canoe overseting the 2d inst. 

5. Mr. Ballard found his canoe which has been gone sometime ; he and 
Ephraim haulld it out of the water. 

6. I was called by Mr. Bradford of Pittston, at 7h. morn. I w rode our 
horse as far as the Hook Point. Ephraim went to take her home. I then 
proseeded by water. Arived at 9h. Found the lady safe delivered (by Doctor 
Parker) of a very fine son — her second child, both sons. I was conducted 
by Nathaniel Norcross (of Littleboro) by water as far as Mr. Selv ester's; 
called there and warmed, and walkt ft'om there home. 

8. I was called at 9h. evening,, to see Mrs. Walker. Thee ice run but we 
got safe over. I wrodefrom Mr. Davenport's landing. 

9. Mrs. Walker was safe delivered of a son which weighed 10 1-4 lbs. I 
came ttom there at llh. and arived safe at home at Ih. p. m. 



December 1. Article in warrant calling 
town meeting for April 4, 1791 : "14. To 
accept of a piece of land at the Hook, given 
by Charles Vaaghan, Esq., for a barying- 
groand, and for setting a meeting-house, if 
wantdd." At an adjoamed meeting held 
May 2d of the same year. "Votad to accept 
of a piece of ground given by Charles 
Vaaghan, Esquire, agreeable to the min- 
utes taken by Ephraim Ballard who sur- 
veyed the same, viz : Beginning at a stake 
and stones on the hill back of the house 
lots which lie upon the river at the village 
called the Hook; thence running west 
northwest ten rods to a stake and stones ; 
thence north twenty-eight and a half rods 
to a stake and stones ; thence north twenty- 
eight and a half degrees east, eight rods to 



a stake and stones ; thence east and south- 
east ten rods to a stake and stones ; thence 
south twenty-eight and one half degrees 
west, eight rods to the first mentioned 
bound ; being half an acre more or less ; to 
be appropriated to the use of a burying- 
place, and for setting a meeting-house whsn 
it may ho found necessary to build one in 
that neighborhood." This was the first 
piece of land that was formally dedicated 
as a cemetery ai the Hook. It was after- 
wards the homestead lot of William Em- 
mons, lying between the present Middle, 
Grove and Summer streets. 

Decembers. Davenport's landing was 
on the eastern shore of the river and oppo- 
site the site of the present Hallowell came- 
tery — below the Ezekiel Pag3 landing. 



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310 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1791. December 10. The Ice stopt against opposite our house. 

12. Esquire Lithgow here, requested of me to go and see his lady next 
weelc. 

IS. Ephraim and Jack brot our sheep from Mr. Peter Clearlc's ; one of them 
has been wounded on the neck; I drest it with tarr. 

14. I was called at 9h. evening, to see Mrs. Selvester who was in labour. 
Mr. Page's infant expired. 

15. Mrs. Selvester was safe delivered of a son and 3d child, which 
weighed 8 1-2 lbs., at 3h. morn. I left her cleverly at 11. 

17. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Savage's; had his oxen shod. 

18. Sunday. Mr. Ballard went to meeting to Colonel Duttun*s; Mr. 
Smith performed. 

19. This day is the anavarsery of my marriage. Many siens have passed 
since that day. I went to housekeeping the same day. Have had 6 removes 
since. My next may be in my last abode. May I be prepared. Thirty-six 
years since I joined in wedlock with Mr. Ballard. 

20. Mr. Ballard is gone to survey land for Asa Cumings. Ephraim went 
to Mr. Selvester's; brot home a pair of calf skin slippers for Hannah. 
William Haywood dined, supt and sleeps here. Mr. Baker of Unity sups and 
sleeps. I have been at home. Jonathan workt at the coart-house. 

21. I was called upon to go to Wlnslow. I went on hors back to Mr. 
Wesson's ; Crost the river on foot ; wrode in a sleigh ; arlved at Esquire 
Lithgow*s at4h. p. m. 

25. Sunday. Mrs. Lithgow was very unwell all day ; her women were 
called in toward*s evening, and shee was safe delivered of a fine son at lOh. 
evening and is cleverly. Mrs. Pattee, Stackpole, Thomas, and Collar tarried 
all night. I set up with my patient, her first born. 

26. I was at the Esquire's. Mrs. Brigg [Bridge] came there at 8, evening. 

27. Esquire Lithgow made me a reward of 24 shillings and a callico gown 
patron and 1 yd cloth, linning. 

31. The number of children I have extracted since I came to Kenebeck I 
find by written acount and other calculations to be 405. I went up to town on 
business, and thus I closed the year; and it is done. The question is, are we 
better than when we first began ; if not God grant we may be. 

1792. 

January 1. Sunday. Mr. Ballard went to hear Mr. Smith; he performed in 
the Acadame at the Hook. 

5. 1 called at Mr. Livermore's and took my ring which Mr. Greanlief 
mended. 

December 18. A large and unfinished until the latter part of the year ; when the 

honse which stood on the present Lowell Diarist records that her son was one of the 

Hall lot in Hallo well. workmen on it. It stood on the northerly 

December 20. The frame of the Market side of the rangeway westerly of the meet- 
Square Conrt honse was raised September ing-house, and like the latter protruded 
21, 1790. The building was opened to the into the road several feet, 
court the first time in January, 1791, bat it December 21. Arthur Lithgow. 
was not finished with laths and plaster 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 311 

1792. January 6. Mr. Ballard sett a bone in my left wrist which I misplast 
as I was wridlng yesterday. 

8. Sunday. I was called at llh. mom, to see the wife of Daniel Savage, 
Junior, who was delivered at 2h. p. m. of a dead daughter. 

9. Mr. Savage's infant was interred at Fort Western. 
11. Jonathan [Ballard] was married to Sally Peirce. 

13. I was called to see Mrs. Hamlen at 9, evening ; shee was safe delivered 
of a son at lOh. 15m. I left her at llh. 45m , and went to Capt. Fhilebrown's ; 
his wife unwell. 

14. I was called to Mr. Jones' ; his lady was delivered at 8h. p. m. of a 
daughter, 3d child, the other 2, sons. 

16. Mr. Ballard went to Colonel North's to carry a schedule of a house 
ft'aim for Mr. Lee. 

18. Mr. Hamlen made me a present of a quill wheal and 3 quarts of rice. 

19. Mr. Savage came in directly for me to go to Savage Bolton's. I went 
on hors back as far as Mr. Pollard's ; in a sleigh A*om there. Mrs. Savage 
went with me. We were once oversett, once I got out and helpt push behind 
the carriage. We arived safe at sun sett. Birth of Savage Bolton's 4th son 
at 8h. evening. A dreadful storm of snow and wind. 

20. I was called at 6h. morn, to go to Phillip Norcross' wife in labour. Mrs. 
Norcross delivered at Ih. 30m. p. m., of her 5th child and first son. Mr. Nor- 
cross was not at home. 

21. Mr. Wald called me to see his wife who was in labour, and was safe 
delivered of her first son and dd child, at the middle of the night. 

24. Was called to Mr. Moses Sewall's at llh. 80m. 

25. Clear, and very cold. Mrs. Moses Sewall was safe delivered at 2h. 15 
m., morn, of a daughter, her 3d child. 

26. Mr. Livermore here about taxes. 

28. I was called by Mr. Shaw at the Hook to see his lady who was in 
labour; shee was safe delivered at 3h. p. m., of a son. 

31. Jonathan went to the meddow camp ; hauled 5 thousan of shingles. 

February 2. I was called to see Mrs. Randal at the sitty. I was called 
from there at 12h. to Capt. Brown's [Fillebrown's] ; his lady had her women 
called at Ih. p. m., and was safe delivered of her first child, a daughter which 
weighed 10 lbs. at Ih. 45m. p. ro., and is cleverly. 

3. I was called at 2h. 30m. morn, by Mr. Seth Williams ; arived at 3 ; his 
lady was very ill, and was safe delivered at 3h. 45m., and seems cleverly. 

6. Sunday. I went to Pittston to see Mrs. Town who is unwell. My horse 
stumbled and dismounted me ; broused a little, but I was able to walk, till I 
met a sleigh. The gentlemen therein assisted in mounting my horse again and 
I arived in safety. Aplied camphlr to my brouses, tarried and dined, left 
direction and medisin and returned home at 5h. p. m. 

9. Was called out at the 11th h. p. m., and went to Joseph Prescott's — his 
wife in labour. 

10. My patient was very unwell thro the night; but was safe delivered at 
6h., morn, of a lusty son. Jonathan informs me that Savage Bolton's iniVint 
expired at 5 this mom. 



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312 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1792. Febraary 11. Jonathan has attended fVineral of Mr. Bolton's infant, 
bat a small number there. 

12. Sunday. I was called between midnight and lb. p. in., to see Mrs. 
Randal who was safe delivered at Ih. of a fine son ; her 3d. She suffered 
before my arrival, but the life of mother and child were preserved. 

14. Ephraim to work for Mr. Child, — he helpt him with two yoak of oxen 
and Jack Livcrmore, yesterday ; the same this day. 

15. Mr. Shnball Pitts, his sister and Parthenia Barton called here ; they 
were going to his brother's at Green Loog. 

16. Jonathan went to the meddow lot for shingles. 

21. Ephraim has been hauling brick for Mr. Hamlen. 

22. Ephraim workt for Mr. Hamlen part of the day; he brot a quill wheal 
home which is a present fl*om Mr. Hamlen to me. 

23. Mr. Ballard is gone to survey or run lines for Jery Badcock and others. 
28. Mrs. Welch and Jenny here going to Mr. Beeman's. The daughter is 

to tarry there, her other two children she informs me she has given to Mr. 
Mitchell at 25 mile Pond to do for as his own. 

March 4. Sunday. There was preaching at our meeting-house. Mr. 
Warrin of Pittston performed. 

6. Daniel Foster's wife delivered — her infant expired. 

6. I was called by Black Edmond at 6h. morn, to see his wife; — had one 
fall ftom my horse. Was assisted by Moses White in prosceding the rest of 
the way. Lidia was delivered at Ih. p. m., of a son —her first bom. 

9. Mr. Livermore returned home from the westward at lOh., evening. 

11. Sunday. Jonathan and Dolly had each a sheep lambed, — both had 
twins. 

13. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim made a pen for our sheep. Dolly's lambs ex- 
pired. 

- 17. We saw Esquire Coney wrlde over the river about sun sett ; returned 
ftrom Boston. 

32. Cloudy, morn ; clear the rest of the day. The sun eclipsed. 

23. Mr. Livermore and wife had our hors and sleigh, went to the hook, 
came back at 2h. p. m. dined. Isaiah Manley workt here. 

26. Mr. Ballard went to survey a little for Mr. Livermore. 

28. Ephraim is at the sugar works with Mr. Densmore's sons. 

29. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim assisting at the sugar works. Jonathan set 
his saw mill at work — sawed loggs. Fast day. 

30. Mr. Ballard and Waid makeing troughs to collect sap in. 

February 15. Ichabod Pitts was a mem- and parish in Pittston (now Gardiner) ; he 

ber of the Society of Friends. He lived at continued there until July, 1796, when he 

Pitts' corner, about a mile from the place removed to Charleston, S. C. 

then called Green Lodge, now West Sidney. March 6*. Edmund Fortes, the negro, 

February 28. Now Bumham. who subsequently was executed at Pownal- 

March 4. Rev. Joseph Warren, the first boro. See entry for September 25, 1794. 
minister settled by the Episcopal church 



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MRS: BALLARD*8 DIART. 313 

1792. April 2. This town met to vote for Governor, Senator, &c. The Ice 
broke op and the river open allmost acrost against our houses ; it parted so 
that people crost in boats at the Fort. 

8. The ice removed above here and the river is open this afternoon. 

4. Jonatuan and his wife went to house keeping. Hannah wrode up with 
Sally. Ephrafm walkt. Mr. Manley and he went and carried Jonathan's 
things from here by water in the forenoon. Mr. Waid and Mr. Ballard divided 
the flax which we raised on his land. 

5. I went to Peter Jones' to see his son who is scalt. 

6. I drest Stephen Jones* burn, made an ointment of lint seed oil, bees wax 
and resin ; drest the child, and sett out for home. Mr. Ballard has been laying 
oat house lotts at the Hook for Mr. Vauhn. 

8. Sunday. Mr. Lory Goodwin's house burnt. 
, 14. Son Town informs me that Hannah Davis has a son a week old. 
16. Mr. Ballard was at Mr. Savage's, having his compass mended. 

19. Mr. Ballard and Esquire Wesson went to Esquire Coney's and engaged 
to lay out 21 townships between the river Penobscott and Kennebeck'. It is 
land which belongs to this Commonwealth. 

20. Mr. Ballard has been to lay a road out to Joseph Preskots. 

21. Capt. Howard and Howland went up this afternoon with their vessels. 
28. I was called by Samuel Jackson to see his wife, who was safe delivered 

at Ih. p. m., of a daughter. 

28. Mr. Ballard been making preparations for his tour into the woods. 

80. I was called to see Moses White's lady who was in travail. I arived 
there at 4h. morn; the lady safe delivered of a daughter at lOh. 5m. Find on 
my return that Mr. Ballard took his departure on his tour of surveying at 12 
o'clock. May God prosper and return him and his company in safety. 

May 3. I was called by Peter Grant, Pitts ton, to see his wife ; they had 
called Doctor Parker before I arived and he seemed to chuse to perform the 
opperation which took place at Ih. llm. a. m. 

5. Mr. Livermore sowed pees for us on the intervail. 

7. Mr. Briggs [Bridge] here, took a deed for his son William ; did not pay 
for it. 

8. I was called at 6h. a. m. to see Jery Powell's wife, went by water. She 
was delivered of a daughter at 8 and I returned at 10 even. 

10. I was called at 6h. morn, to see S. J. Foster's wife, who was safe de- 
livered at 11 of a daughter. I arived at home at 5 p. m., and was called by 
Colonel Sewall at 7 to see his lady, shee being in labour. Was there all night. 
The field piece flreing. 

11. I was at Captain Sewall's; he was surveying boards at Jones's mills; 
his lady's Illness increast at 5, and shee was safe delivered at 6h. p. m. of a 
fine daughter, and is cleverly. Mrs. Brooks, Voce, and Parker, assistants. 

12. Mr. Hamlen sent me a stand to sett a light on. 

15. I was called at 9h., evening, to see Mrs. Beeman ; shee was delivered 
soon after my arrival of a daughter — 4th daughter. I tarried all night. 
• 17. I was called at lOh. mom, to see Richard Foster's wife, in labour. 

18. Mrs. Richard Foster was safe delivered of a daughter and first child at 



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314 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

5h. 30m. I was called apoD to go and see the lady of Jed. Preskott, and I 
arlved there at 10. Find her In laboar. 

1792. May 19. My patient*s illness came on at8h. mom. I desired Doctor 
Hubard might be sent for, which request was complied with ; but by Divine 
assistance I performed the operation, which was blisst with the preservation 
of the lives of mother and infant : the life of the latter — a son — I dispared of 
for some time. The most pereloas slen I ever past thro in the cours of my 
practice ; blessed be God for his goodness. Mrs. Llvermore's son born — ^Doctor 
Coney assisted her. 

20. Sunday. Went to see Mrs. Livermore who was put to bed yesterday, 
and is cleverly ; her Infant allso. 

22. I went up to the stones afternoon. 

26. My black turkey brot out 14 chicks. 

29. I was called to see Mrs. Childs. 

30. Mrs. Childs veiy unwell, all day. The field peece was fired the most of 
the night which interrupted my patient much. 

31. Mrs. Child's illness came on and shee safe delivered of a fine son [James 
Loring] at Oh. 30m. p. m., and is cleverly; and every circumstance seemed 
agreeable ; but alas I what changeing seins take place I at 8 in the evening as a 
number were collected and diverting themselves (if I may use the expression), 
by fireing the field pieces, three men, viz : Will Voce, James and Samuel 
Johnson, were wounded by an unexpected discharg, by reason of Its not being 
properly swabed. The two Johnsons were thought to be mortally wounded. 
They were carried to Mr. Cragg's. I went with Mr. Child and bathed their 
wounds. 

June 1. I went to Mr. Cragg*s; helpt dress the wounded. Samuel Johnson 
was carried on a bier born by 4 men from Mr. Cragg*s to Mr. Child's where 
[his wound] was drest. I took care of him thro the day. Doctor Colman 
Informed me his wife and child went on board a vessel bound for Nubary. 

2. I was at Mr. Child's takeing care of Samuel Johnson. I made an oint- 
ment and applyed to Samuel's scars, bathed them with spirrit and wormwood. 
Mr. Ballard returned from his survey, in health; he came to Mr. Child's and 
conducted me home by water. Ephraim assisted. 

4. I went to Mr. Child's; his wife and infisint are cleverly. Johnson is as 
well as can be expected. 

7. Ephraim trod on a board in which was a nale and lambed himself. I 
was called at 8h. evening, by Ebenezer Church to see his wife who was in 
labour; her child was born and not alive before my arrival, but shee was in 
dangerous circumstances. 

10. Phineheas Pain's daughter born. 

13. Polly Livermore here. Informs me her mammy fell thro the fioor and 
hnrt her self. 

May 22. Kennedy hill was a compar- removed for railroad filling. A remnant 

atively lofty dilavial knoll sloping to the still remains at the easterly line of the 

westam shore of the river in the near trotting park endosnre. 

vicinity of Mile rock. It was composed of May 31. Near the meeting-house in the 

pebbles and gravel, and has been mostly present Market square. 



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MRS. Ballard's diary. 315 

1792. June 15. Mr. Ballard been surveying hous lotts at the Hook. 

16. Ephraim attempted going to mill by water; got as fkr as Mr. Shep- 
herd's, the wind against him ; he left his canoe and corn and his daddy went 
and brot it home again. 

17. Sunday. I was called at 9h. 30m. by Mr. Hows to see Mrs. Daws who 
was in labour, and was delivered at 9h. evening, of a fine son [James] her 
fifth child — all males. 

19. Mr. Ballard to raising of Mr. Dummer's house. 

21. Ephraim went to Pittston to see Capt. Grant's vessel lancht, but was 
dlsapointed, It being launcht yesterday. Jonathan here; informed me Mrs. 
Peter Jones Is very unwell, ocationed by her husband's ill usage and keeping 
her in the seller barefoot. O the wretch ; he deserves severe punishment. 

22. We were informed at sun sett that Billy Foster fell out of a canoe at 
6h. p. m., and is drowned. Billy Foster interred at 4h. p. m. 

24. Sunday. Dolly returned f^om Winthrop. Hannah's hors got out of 
the pasture and shee tarried. They attended a Baptest meeting ; saw one Mrs. 
Smith baptized. Mr. Baxter and Mrs. Dorcas Pollard joined in wedlock this 
evening. 

25. Mr. Ballard left home bound to Winslow as an apriser of land belong- 
ing to a Mr. Pitt which Esquire Williams is about to purchase. 

28. I went to acquaint Mrs. Livermore that her children with a hors they 
had taken into our field were wallowing in the grass. 

July 1. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and myself and son Ephraim attended public 
worship. Mr. Smith discourst in the mom, from John 7th c, 37th v. ; In the 
afternoon f^om I Corinth, 4th, 20th. Mr. Joseph Stackpool had a son born,— 
it was not alive. 

2. Called to see Oeorge Bolton's wife who was in labour, at Ih. p. m. 

3. My patient was safe delivered at 30m. p. m. of a son, her 4th son and 
5th child. Both mother and infant are cleverly. 

6. My daughter Hannah maid my bnnnit over anew, and finisht Mrs. Brad- 
bury's ; shee came for it. 

7. Was informed that Nathaniel Voce was drowned yesterday and is to be 
interred this afternoon. Mr. Ballard sett on the jury of inquest on the boddy. 
Mr. Voce interred this day at 4 p. m. 

8. Sunday. Mr. Smith discourst ftom Numbers 23d and 10th. 

9. I was called this morn to see Mrs. William Swanton who is In labour 
with her first child ; shee was safe delivered at 9h. evening, of a fine daughter. 

12. Mr. Ballard complains of a pain in his back ; I applied burdock leaves 
wilted in spirrit. 

15. Sunday. Mr. Smith discoarst A'om 1st John, 5 ch. 10 vers, in the mom ; 
afternoon, Proverbs 1st, 29th. Wm. Briggs and Nabby Fuller published the 
2nd time. 

16. Hannah Rock wood spraint her foot going to the river; was brot back 
and tarried here this night. 

June 19. The honse of Nathaniel Bum- 119 tons, built by Samuel and Peter Grant 

mer, which is still standing on Dummer's — father and son; its first master was 

lane in Hallowell. Peter Grant, the son. 

June 21. This was the schooner Nancy ^ 



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316 HI8TORT OF AUGUSTA. 

1792. July 17. Hannah Rockwood went home on hors back, Cyrus and 
Hannah In company. 

21. I was called at the dawn of day to see Benjamin Preskott*s wife, who 
was safe delivered at Ih. p. m. of a son, — her 2d child. I left her somewhat 
comfortable at 3h. 15m. ; had to wride in a shower; arived home at 4. 

28. Mr. Hamlen had a house phraim raised this afternoon. My daughters 
are gone there to a dance. 

24. I was called out before day to see the wife of Samuel Dawin ; was met 
at the foot of the hill beyond Savage Bolton*8 with news that shee was got to 
bed, and returned home. Mr. Anderson called me at noon ; his wife delivered 
of a son at 4 p. m. 

28. I was called to see Mrs. Sheppard. She was delivered at 9h. of a very 
tne son, her 3d child. 

August 5. Sunday. Mr. Ballard« myself and Lucy Pettee, Ephraim and 
Polly attended worship ; Cyrus, afternoon. Mr. Frisby of Ipswich performed ; 
spoke, forenoon, from Acts 17th, 30, 81; afternoon ft*om Matthew 1 1th, 30th. 
Colonel Sewall had a child baptised by the name of Meriah [Maria] ; Mr. 
Capin one named Charlotta; Mr. Livermore one by the name of Alpheus; Mr. 
Abraham Page's children, and one of Mr. McMasters baptised at evening at 
Mr. McMasters*. 

6. We had a little rain for which we ought to giv thanks. 

10. There was a fire raged back of the Hook ; the inhabitants were much 
alarmed ; sent to the Fort for help to prevent their buildings being burnt. 

11. Mr. Ballard returned at evening firom Unity; brot the melloncolly news 
of Davie Page being drowned this afternoon in a pond by Capt. Whicher*s. 

12. Mr. Winget called here. Page was taken out of the water this morn. 

13. Mr. Ballard and my daughter Hannah attended fhneral of David Page. 
Ifi. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Ingerham*s, afternoon ; lett his mcddow grass 

to him to cutt to the halves. 
• 17. I was called to see Mrs. Savage; tarried all night. O the flees. 

19. Sunday. Mr. Smith discourst IVom Micah 6 :8 ; IVom 1st Peter, 2 :21st. 

20. I was called by Mr. Benjamin Petengail (at 6 this mom) to see his lady 
who is in labour, and was safe delivered at 9h. evening, of a fine daughter, — 
her fifth child and 3d daughter; her last before was 10 years old last March. 
James Cuwen*s wife fell ft'om her hors and hurt her much ; is at Mr. Thomas'. 

25. Robert McCausland's infant expired. 

26. Sunday. Mr. Smith discourst fi*om Luke 6th, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 verses. 
Samuel Church's wife delivered llh. 80., evening. Mr. McCausland's daughter 
interred at 3 o'clock. 

. 27. Mr. Ballard left home on his surveying business (for the Common- 
wealth, which he began last May,) this morn at 10 o'clock. 

July 23. Theophilas Hamlen. The knee breeches and buckles to the time of his 

house was built on DLckman Court, and death,— long after they ceased to be fashion 

stood until the great fire of 1855. able. His house was the one now standing 

August 12. Joshua Wingate (1749-1844) at the southwest comer of Second and 

was postmaster and trader at the Hook, Union streets, 
and a man of local prominence. He wore 



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MRS. BALLABD*S DIART. 317 

1792. August 80. Mr. Hamlen moved to his new house. 
September 3. My girls washt at the brook. I was called at 2h. p. m., to 
James Savage's wife who was in labour. 

4. Mrs. Savage was delivered at 2h. mom, of a daughter, her llth child 
and is cleverly. I was called early to see Mr. Andrew's infant, who is sick 
with the chin cough. I saw Mr. Benjamin Brown, his wife and her sister on 
their way to Canaan. Isaiah Manley expired. 

5. I was called this night to see Charles Clark's wife who was delivered at 
8h. morn, of a sou, her 4th child ; her Sd is destitute of reason by reason [of] 
fitts. 

7. Mr. Ballard returned ft'om surveying for the Commopwealth. 

9. Sunday. Moses Pollard and Hannah Ballard publish t. 

12. North's horses broak down the fence and lay in my corn all night. 

14. Aunt Moore, Oxford, was interred this day. 

16. Sunday. I was called by Mr. Allin, at 7h. mom, to see his wife ; shee 
was safe delivered at 9 of a daughter. 

19. Mr. Ballard and the rest of my family went to see the muster. A gen« 
eral muster of the regiment at Shnbal Hinkley's. 

23. Mr. Ballard, myself and Patty, attended worship in public. Mr. Frisby 
performed and administered the ordinances of the supper to a few, and bap- 
tism to a child of Mr. Wesson's. 

24. My son [Jonathan] was taken; David Pollard and David Berry allso. 
The crime which was aledged against them in the warrant was a riott. The 
tryal is postponed till October. 

26. I went, afternoon, to Jobe Springer's to see a wheal which I bot of 
Capt. Howland ; gave him 13 shillings for it, and 2 shillings, 9 pence for a pair 
of cards. 

27. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim went to see Mrs. Medcalf baptised by plung« 
ing. 

28. Mr. [Ballard] working on the bridge. 

80. Sunday. Mr. Smith delivered a farewell sermon; his text, forenoon, 
Corinth 13:13; afternoon, Isaiah 17:17. 

October 1. Mr. Ballard workt on the bridge, raising it. 

2. Mr. Ballard finisht raising the bridg this morn ; he has been laying out 
a streat at the Hook. 

4. I gathered my cammomile, the second gathering. 

14. Sunday. I am informed that Mr. Swet and two of his children are 
deceast with the small pox. It is 15 years this day sine we arived at Kena- 
beck, at Jones' Landing. 

19. Mr. Ballard at Mr. Sheppard's on business with General Dearborn and 
Colonel Howard. 

August 30. This house stood on Dick- September 9. Daughter of the Diarist, 

man lane and was homed in the fire of 17th Ssptember 19. Six companies of Colonel 

September, 1865. Page's regiment with Major Colbom's 

September 3. The then living brook that troop of horse, were inspected, 
ran through the gaily that is now pasture 
near the Hallowell line. 



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318 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1792. October 23. Mrs. Kenney delivered of a son at lOh. mom. 
24. I was called to Thomas Kennej's at 11, evening. 

26. Mrs. Kenney delivered of a son at Ih. morn. Very hard rain. I walkt 
to the landing thro great fatague; past by water to Mr. Wesson's; walkt 
from there to Mr. Burtnu's ; arived at 4h. morn ; find his wife delivered of a 
daughter, but In some danger, for want of assistance, but thro Providence I 
delivered her safe at 4h. 80m. I was as muddy as I conid well be. 

27. I was called at 4h. mom, to see the wife of EUsha Preskott, who was 
in labour and was safe delivered of a son at 5h. evening. I was attended by 
an English young lady who lodges at Mrs. Sberburn's. 

28. Sunday. The matrimonial writes were celebrated between Moses Pol- 
lard of this town, and my daughter Hannah, this evening. Esquire Coney 
performed the ceremony. 

November 1. I was called to see Mrs. Ezra Hodges at 4 p. m.; shee was 
safe delivered at llh. evening, of a very fine son, — her sixth child. 

2. I went to Mager Stlckney*s at 9h. evening; his wife delivered at llh. 
5m. of a daughter. Bizer Benjamin's wife delivered of 2 sons — both dead. 

10. I have been at home. Stript turkey feathers. 

11. Sunday. Mr. Ballard paid John Jones 21 dollars in part of a note he 
had against him. 

15. Mr. Ballard workt at the bridge over the Gully. Cyrus came home; 
has quit the grist mill he has tended. Dolly returned firom her apprenticeship 
with Mr. Densmore. Cyrus tended Mr. Halloweirs mill 14 months; Capt. 
Nichols has hired it now. 

18. Sunday. Mr. Pollard and Shubal Pitt dined here; thee latter was 
Joined in the bands of wedlock with Parthenla Barton. The ceremony per- 
formed by Samuel Dutton, Esq. We had no company except our family attend. 
The Justice gave the fee to the bride. 

22. The river was so full of Ice it allmost stopt this morn. 

29. It is the day appointed for Thanksgiving. Roasted a Turkey. 
80. Mr. Ballard returned from surveying a 15 mile lott. 

Dec. 2. Sunday. We were infornied that Old Lady Coney was not like to 
survive but little while as her symptoms are more dangerous. Mr. Livermore, 
his wife and son and myself went over to see her ; crost the river In a canoe 
by breaking thro the ice in several places. We found the Old Lady in a very 
helpless and allmost senseless situation ; her daughter Cumings ishernurs; 
her tryals are great. God grant her strength and patients to perform her 
arduous task. Old Lady Coney had a late shock of the palsey — her left side 
is useless. 

7. EllenY Taylor expired. 

9. EUy Taylor was interred this day. 

12. Mr. Pollard came and conducted my daughter and his spouse home to 
hous keepiug. May [they] be happy. Dolly help her put up her furniture and 
went home with her. Ephraim drove the team. 

Novembdr 15. (1) Sabssquently called Britt's gully. (2) Robert Hallowell's mill 
on the Cobbosseecontee at Pittston. 



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MBS. Ballard's diabt. 319 

1792. December 16. John Chamberlln was marled the 10th Inst ; removed 
his wife to Sidney the llth ; shee was delivered of a daughter the 12th, and it 
expired before night. 

18. Mr. Ballard mn the S. line of this lot, and went to Colonel Howard's. 

20. Mr. Shaball Pitts removed his wife fh)m here and went to hous keep- 
ing. May they prosper in this life and be happy in the future. 

28. At Mr. Porter's ; his wife was ill all day ; he gone. 

29. Mrs. Porter was safe delivered at Ih. mom, of a daughter. I lost a 
larg handkerchief as I was on my way to Washington. 

31. And now this year is come to a close. May we begin a new one in the 
serves of our Great Master who will reward his faithfbll servants. 

1793. 

Janaary 4. I have washt the first washing I have done without help this 
several years. 

6. Sunday. Mr. Smith preacht at the Hook. John North's first son 
born. 

9. The cause in which Emerson prosecuted Mr. Ballard was tried ; turned 
in favor of the latter. 

11. The Jury brot in their verdict in the cause of Andrus. It was that 
Pollard, Berry, and Jonathan should pay I50£ damage. Pollard apealed. 

12. Mr. Ballard and sons went to coart. The coart adjourned without 
day. 

14. I was called to see Mrs. Thwing at 6h. evening ; shee was delivered at 
10 of her first bom, a son. I was waited for by Mr. Brown to attend Mrs. 
Suell; we arived there at llh. 80m. ; shee was delivered off a son at 12. I 
tarried there thro the night. 

15. Mrs. Barton came here yesterday evening ; doing business with Judg 
Boman. 

17. I was at Mr. Hinklcy's. Mrs. Hinkley was delivered of a fine son at 
half after 11, evening. This birth was on the 18th, at 1 or 2 in the morn. 

21. Isaac Hardin called me to see his wife at 9h. evening. 

22. At Hardin's; his wife delivered of a son at Sh., morn, and I returned 
at 8h. morn. 

23. I was called to see Mrs. Blak who was delivered at 5 p. m., of a son, 
and I returned. 

26. I was called to Savage Bolton's, at 8h., evening; his wife was 
delivered at llh. 50m., of a daughter, — her 6th child. 

30. At my son's [Jonathan's] ; his little son burnt his head, we applied 
rhnm and salt. 

December 18. "Ephraim Ballard's bill as Washington plantation before Its incor- 

against William Hoirard, Esqr., Decern. poration. 

her. To nmnlng S. line of lot where I live, Janaary 16. Jonathan Bowman of 

4 :6." Pownalboro. 

December 29. Monnt Vernon was known 



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320 



HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 



1793. February 3. Sunday. Mr. Ballard went to the Hook to hear Mr. Lock. 

8. Mr. Ballard brot a pair of shoes from Mr. Child's for me. Informs me 
their infant is very sick. 

9. Cyrus went to Moses Sewall's ; bot 8 1-2 lbs. chees — cost d shillings 
8 pence ; gingerbread, 4 pence. 

12. Mr. McCausIand came here for Mrs. Barton; his wife is failing fast; 
he informs me that Mr. Suel's infant expired the 12th day of its life. Mr. 
Livermqre dined here ; son Jonathan allso. Jacob Bradbury called me to see 
his wife who was in labour with her first child. 

13. At Jacob Bradbury's. Mrs. Bradbury was delivered at 9h.80m., of a 
son, and I returned home at 1 p. m. 

16. Mr. Caton was safe delivered at 3h. mom. of a daughter, and I 
returned home at lOh. 

19. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. Voce. Parson Warrin here. 

24. I was called at 3h. to Moses Car's lady ; shee was delivered at 5 of a 
flue daughter, — her first born. Mr. Ballard attended worship at the 
academy. 

March 1. Mr. Ballard has been surveying for Esq. Matthew. 

8. Mr. Llvermore extracted a tooth for me and one for Dolly. 

10. Mathew Howard and Shubal Pitts here. 



February 3. Rev. Ward Locke, a min- 
ister of the Free Baptist denomiDation, had 
been pastor of a church in London and 
Canterbury, N. H., and removed to the 
District of Maine in 1792. The same year 
he began to preach in Farmington, and a 
revival of religion followed his labors; 
March 29, 1793, he organized the First Free 
Baptist Church on the Sandy river (at 
Farmington), and became its pastor. He 
removed to Chestervilie in 1813 ; he was a 
member of the Maine Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1819-'20. He died in November, 
1828. His father, Edward Locke, removed 
to Augusta in 1818, and owned a house 
here at the time of his decease in 1821. 

March 10. Matthew Hayward built in 
1796 a dwelling house for himself and 
family at the easterly end of what has since 
been named Green street at its northwest 
junction with Hartford Square. The con- 
tractor and carpenter was Theophilus 
Hamlen. Mr. Hayward lived in the house 
several years and then sold it and moved 
to Winthrop ; he owned forty or fifty acres 
of land westerly of his house, which he 
cultivated as a farm and which in the 
course of a century has become a compact 
residential part of the city. Mr« Hayward 
was a man of property and like most 



others of his class in his day was a lender 
of money on mortgages and other good 
security. The house which he built was 
superior in size and dignity to many others 
in the village ; the frame was of hewn fine 
trees, the rafters were eight inches, and the 
sills and plates more than a foot square ; 
surrounding was a neat rail fence, and 
there were planted a number of silver-leaf 
poplar trees about fifteen ftot apart, which 
were tall and graceful and gave a peculiar 
charm to the homestead. Succeeding Mr. 
Hayward, Benjamin Whitwell lived in the 
house until 1805, when he removed into the 
house built by himself on Oreen street 
(which was subsequently the Stanwood 
homestead, and later for awhile the home 
of James G. Blaine). The Hayward house 
was occupied by Solomon Yose and later 
by Deacon John Means, who lived there 
from 1815 to 1818 ; after him John Davis, 
and Jesse Robinson ; Darius Alden, Ed- 
ward Rowse, and other prominent Augusta 
citizens, lived there. In 1871 the house 
was remodeled and partly rebuilt while in 
the ownership of James W. Bradbury, but 
the original frame and boarding were re- 
tained. Subsequently it was bought by 
George N. Lawrence, who occupied it in 
1902. 



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MRS. Ballard's diart. 321 

1798. March 18. I was at Mr. David Pollard's; his wife was delivered at 
llh. evening, of a son. 

17. Sunday. I went to Mr. Lathrop. 

18. I went fh)m Lathrop's to James Hinkley's, at 8h. mom; his wife 
delivered at 7h. evening, of a daughter and I returned at 10 to Mr. Lathrop's. 

19. Mrs. Lathrop was delivered of a son at llh. 80m. mom, which 
weighed 12 lbs. 

22. I was called at €h., afternoon, to see Mrs. Page, who was delivered at 
10 of a fine son, her 8th child. Received 6 shillings of Mr. Page. Birth 14th 

25. I went to the Hook as far as Ellsha Preskott's. 

26. I was called by Peter Jones to his wife In labonr, at 8h. mom ; shee 
was safe delivered at 4 of a son. Mr. Ballard Is gone to survey for Doctor 
Parker. Jobe Springer had a son born this night. 

29. The flreshet is very high. I was called to see Mrs. Parker, the nez t 
house below here. 

80. Mrs. Parker was safe delivered at llh., forenoon, of a daughter. I 
left her and Infant cleverly at 2h. p. m., and returned home. Mn Ballard 
fought fire at Cabesy upper mill. 

April 1. I was at Mr. Mason's. 

2. Mrs. Mason was safe delivered at the 2nd h., mom, of a son, — her 
second child. I called and klsst little Jack. 

8. I was called to see Mrs. William Pitt who was in labour; shee was 
delivered at lOh. evening, of a dead son. 

4. Mr. Pitts' inftint was Interred this afternoon. Mother Ballard dlsseast. 

5. I was called at sun sett to see Mrs. Buzel, who was safe delivered at 
9h. evening of a fine son. 

11. Mrs. Densmore was delivered of a daughter at llh. morn. I went to 
Dany's at evening. 

12. I put Mrs. Dany to bed with a fine son about the middle of the night ; 
shee and Infant cleverly. I retumed home at 4h. morn. 

16. Mr. Ballard, with Mr. Foster, Noah Woodward, and Sllva Moore sett 
out to mn lines on Mr. Pitts' land In Pownalboro. 

18. Mrs. Llvermore sent for me to see her Infant ; it Is scollt. 

21. I was called at half after 8, evening, to Deacon Coney's; his lady 
expired at 10. Mrs. McMaster and I put her In grave cloaths. Mrs. Brooks 
was present; the former went home after midnight. Mrs. Brooks and I 
tarried all night. 

24. We attended ftineral of Old Lady Cony ; shee was Interred In the 
Doctor's field. Mr. Prockter maid the prayer; hs Is preaching at Plttston. 

25. Mrs. Hamlin went past here bound for Boston. 

29. I was called between twelve and one this mom to see Mrs. Thomas 
Hlnkley who was In labour, and was delivered of a fine son at llh. The 9th 
by two wives. 

80. Cyrus and Ephralm ploughing the enterval. 

April 2. Jonathan Ballard, Junior, who April 24. The wife of Deacon Samoel 
occupied a large placa in the affections of Cony (1718-1803). 
his grandmother, the Diarist. 

21 



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822 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1793. May 1. I was called at 1 hoar, morn, to see Mrs. Capen who was in 
labour; shee was delivered of a fine daughter at 2, and I tarried there till 
after dineing Cyrus came to Mr. Page's landing and conducted me over the 
river. 478th extraction since I came to Hallowell. 

8. Ephraim Cowen called me to see his wife who is unwell. 

7. Mrs. Cowen*s illness came on about two this mom, and shee was safe 
delivered at 3h. 30m., of a flne daughter. 

8. I went to see Mrs. Robert McCausland ; find her very low. I crosst the river 
at General Dearborn's and at Norcrosses. 

11. Mr. Ballard went to survey for Briant Fletcher. 

12. Sunday. My son Jonathan and daughter Dolly went to see Mrs. 
McCausland and found her very low ; shee views herself near the close of life. 
May shee be composed, have an easy passage ft'om time to eternity, and may 
the change of scenes be her everlasting happiness. 

18. Old Lady Coutch called ; Ephraim helpt her over the river. 

14. I was called to Samuel Cnmingse's to see his wife; shee was delivered 
at 2h. pk m. of a daughter, — her 8d child. 

15. I went to take my leave of Mr. Dany and wife who left this town, and 
are going to New town. 

17. We were informed of the death of Mrs. McCausland. 

19. Cyrus and I went to Pittston; attended service, afternoon, and the 
ftineral of Mr. Robert McCausland's wife, oldest daughter of brother Town. 
The remains interred at 5h. p. m. 

28. Ephraim went to flght Are on Mr. Keneda's hill. 

24. The fire rages on both sides of the river. 

27. ' I went to Deacon and Doctor Cony*s ; daughter Ballard with her. 

28. Mr. Partradge and Mrs. Rockwood married. 

29. John Jones, Esquire, here; and settled allacounts and notes with Mr. 
Ballard and my son Cyrus. Cyrus shearing our sheep. 

June 1. Some lite showers. I was called at Sh. this mom, to see Bulah at 
Mr. Cuminges ; shee was delivered at 4 of a daughter. I went to Mr. Joseph 
Brown's to see his lady, who was safe delivered at 2h. p. m., of a daughter. 
I tarried till 4h. when his son conducted me to Mr. Shepherd's by water ; 
from there I took passage with Joseph Preskott to Mr. Daw's ; walkt IVom 
there home. Feel very much fatagued. I received 6 shillings of Mrs. Brown. 

4. Was called to Samuel Norcrosse's ; his wife in labour. 

8. Mrs. Norcross was safe delivered at the llh. forenoon, of a daughter. 
I tarried with her till 8h. evening, when I left her and infant somewhat 
comfortable. 

May 1. Ezekiel Page's landing was on May 17. The mother of Henry Mc- 

the eastern shore of the river, nearly op- Cansland, the maniac, 

posite the Howard farm and the home of May 28. Amos Partridge and Hannah 

the Diarist. Its mins are still visible. Rockwood. 

May 8. Ganeral Dearborn lived in a June 1. Bnlah Ephraims, the wife of 

house which stood near the site of the pres- Laban Prince, mnlattoes. 
ent Gardiner National Bank. 



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MRS. Ballard's diart. 



323 



1793. June 11. Mr. Moore's son drowned. 

12. I was called at 9h. to see the wife of Henry McCausIand, who Is In 
labour. I was there all night. George Moore interred. 

18. I was at Mr. McCausland's ; shee was safe delivered of a son at 6h. noon. 
20. I was called at 4h. mom, to see Mrs. Greely ; she was safe delivered at 
at 8 of a flne daughter, — her 8th child. 

23. Sunday. Sally Densmore brot their infant to have a burn drest. I 
was called to see James Hinkley's Sd wife, at 12 o*clock; shee was 
delivered at llh. evening of a son, — her first bom. 

24. Esquire Lithgow here at evening ; he wishes to see me at his house 
about a fortnit hence. A child killed by the fall of a tree. 

27. Thomas Stickney's wife in labour, at 8h. morn; shee was safe 
delivered at 10 of a son, — her first born. 

28. A Mr. Hinkly drowned at Pittston. 

29. A man wounded In the woods very badly. 

30. Sunday. Our family attended worship at the Hook. I myself did 
aftemoon. 

July 1. Samuel Philbrook hurt In a saw mill. Nathan Burtun's child 
drowned. Mrs. Lang was here. 

3. I was called at 8h. morn, to see Capt. Ney's lady who is in labour; shee 
was safe delivered at 10 of a very fine son. 

7. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and Cyrus attended worship. Mr. Tumer 
performed. 

8. Mr. Ballard sett out for Pownalboro to attend coart on the Grand jury. 

9. My sons went down to coart. 

13. Two gentlemen here bound to Sandy river; a lady and little Miss 
allso. Informed that the cause of Andrews and my son [Jonathan] is 
continued. 

16. I was called at sun rise to see John Coutche's wife who was in labour ; 
shee was safe delivered of a flne son at 7h. 30m., morn. 

18. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim mowing and makeing hay. Mrs. Pitts here 
weaving. 



Jane 24. Arthar Lithgow. 

July 1. She was the wife of Samnel 
Lang of Pittston (Gardiner), and the 
dao^bter of larajl and Zeraah (Wattles) 
Damon of Edgecomb. Samnel Lang, 
blacksmith, lived awhile in Wiscasset, but 
removed to Gardiner where he died in 
1803. His son, John Damon Lang, was 
bom in Gardiner, May 14, 1799 ; removed 
to North Berwick while a young man, and 
was married there March 17, 1821, to Ann 
Elmira, dan. of Thomas and Sarah (Mor- 
rell) Stackpole; she died in Yassalboro 
March 19, 1879; he died May 14, of the 
same year. John D. Lang was a promi- 
nent member of the Society of Friends, and 



a man of great physical and mental vigor 
and business capacity. He was for many 
years a property owner in Angnsta. He 
was a conspicnoas member of the Indian 
peace commission of the United States 
long before and at the time of his death. 
John D. Lang and Joseph Eaton (1800- 
1865) were leading promoters of the exten- 
sion of the railroad from Augusta to 
Watervilie and Skowhegan (1853-'57), and 
were sufficiently inflnentiai to have the road 
located on the east side of the river from 
Augusta to Watervilie for the benefit of 
their own estates, — necessitating the build- 
ing of two bridges across the Kennebec 
river, and another over the Sebasticook. 



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324 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA, 



1793. July 19. Was iDformed that son Town's child expired the 10th inst. 
May the triall be sanctified to each of as. 

24. Mr. Ballard went to survey apiece of land for Doctor Coleman which 
he purchased of Mr. Pollard. 

27. Ephraim and Dolly went to Wlnslow. Mr. Ballard to surrey house lots 
for Mr. Vauhn. 

28. We left the house alone, and attended worship at the Academy. Found 
some beef put into a window when we returned. Mr. Jotham Sewall and my 
son Jonathan here after meeting. 

August 1. I went to see Patty Livermore who is siezed with St. Vites 
Daunce. Was called at llh. to see Black Hitty ; went by water. 

2. At Mr. Grlfln's. I put my patient to. bed with a son at Ih. mom, and 
returned home about sunrise. 

9. Mr. Sewairs child was interred. 

19. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. McMaster. 

22. Church at Pitt^ton burnt. 

24. Ephraim is gone to Pittston to mill ; he informs he saw the ashes of 
the church. 

25. Sunday. My Ikmily all attended public worship. The good old 
gentleman's discourse was adapted to the youth, more particularly, ft'om those 
words — Remember thy Creator in the days of thy youth ; his exortations 
were excellent. May they be deeply impressed on their minds for their 

uture good. 
28. Mr. Gow and his wife here to have a gown cutt for her. 



August 1. HiUy Slocam, the wife of 
Nicholas Wilson, both colored. 

August 22. Thij was a wooden building 
of one story, erected in 1771 (bat not fin- 
ished) by the execntors of the will of Dr. 
Sylvester Gardiner, on the spot now occu- 
pied by the Episcopal Chosch vestry at 
Gardiner. Rev. Jacob Bailey, the mission- 
ary, recorded in his diary August 6, 1772 : 
"WenttoGardinerston. Raised the spire." 
On Sunday, August 16, following, he re- 
corded : "Opened the Church at Cobosee, 
80 persons present. Baptized Daniel 11b- 
betts, John Dorr, and Joseph Pike, Ad- 
vents ; and Louisa Fletcher, Theodore Ed- 
ward and Abiathar Tibbetts, and Hannah 
Warren." In the steeple was a bell. In 
1792, the town voted that Major Reuben 
Colbum "shonld get the windows and a 
door pnt up in the meeting-house." This 
was the earliest house of public worship in 
ancient Pittston. The fire that consumed 
it was set by Henry McCansland, the re- 
ligions maniac. (See entry for October 19, 
1794.) (See sketch of Syl'toster Gardiner.) 

Augnst 28. James Gow (1766-1842), a 
native of Scotland, came to America in 



1792, and settled at the Hook vlUage of 
Hallowell in 1793 ; he commenced business 
as a tailor in a shop at the foot of what has 
since become Academy street ; his sign was 
— "J. Gow, tailor from London." Gow's 
liane took its name from him ; he habitually 
wore on his coat a set of large pearl but- 
tons which he brought to this country, and 
as soon as a coat wore out the buttons were 
made to do service on a new one, — and 
this nearly or quite to the time of his death. 
For awhile he was collector of taxes, and 
he invariably carried his papers and tax 
books in a small package enclosed in a blue 
checked cotton handkerchief which he car- 
ried in hand whUe on his collecting tours. 
He was a deacon of the Old South Church 
from near the time of its formation until 
his death. Nobody ever lisped a scandal 
against him; he was remarkable fbr hit 
impassioned prayers in his rich Scotch 
brogue at social religious meetings. When 
he passed away his townsmen felt that a 
truly good man had gone to his reward. 
(Recollections of Danforth P. Livermore, 
in 1885.) 



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MRS. Ballard's diart. 



325 



1798. September 1. I was at meeting. Mrs. Ingerham Informed me that 
Mrs. Hewins was delivered of a son the 26th ult. 

2. My daughter DoUj is 21 years old this day. Many changing siens have 
I past thro in those years. I went, afternoon, to Capt. Meloy's. 

3. I was called at 9h. to see Mr. Jere Darner's lady who was in labour ; 
shee was delivered at 5h. evening, of a fine son, their first bom. 

6. I was called at 6h. morn, to see Mrs. McNule who was in labour; shee 
was delivered at 12 of a son which was inspired with life bat expired in a 
short time after the birth. I left her as well as could be expected, at 6h. p. m., 
and came home. 

7. I have been at home, fixing for Mr. Ballard*s departure to lay out 4 
townships for this commonwealth. 

8. Sunday. Mr. Ballard, Cyrus, and Ephraim and I attended devine 
service. The Rev'd Mr. Turner's discourse was concerning the great day 
of Judgment. Mr. Savage here; informs that an Indian boy who served at 
Mr. Sheppard's was drowned at or near his wharf this afternoon. I was 
called to see Mrs. Lashness at 1 Ih. evening. 

9. Mrs. Lashnus was safe delivered at 5h. mom, of a fine son which 
weighed 11 1-2 lbs. Mr. Ballard sett out on his toar of surveying. 

14. Mr. Buzell called me to go and see his sister Judy who was In labour. 
I arived at his house after dusk. I felt the collie before I reacht there. Was 
severely exercised with it thro the night. 

15. Sunday. I was still labouring under the triall of the colllck. I was 
easier towards night, when my patient's illness came on more regular, and 
she was safe delivered at oh. p. m., of a fine son. 

16. Monday. At Mr. Buzell's, New France. I sett out, weak as I was 
and wrode home. I drank 2 cups of tea and eat a little, which is the first 
food I have taken since Saterdy noone, except thin gruel. I made a 
decoction of beaver fU, peneroial and cammonile for myself and daughter. 



September 2. Capt. John Malloy's houBC 
was on the lot now occupied by the Hub- 
bard Free Library building. 

September 8. Rev. Charles Turner, 
formerly minister at Doxborongh, Mass., 
had been engaged to preach in the town at 
$4.50 a week ; Doctor Cony boarded him 
and his horse for 12 sliillings per week. 
Mr. Turner continued his labors hi the 
town until the following March, preaching 
one third of the time at the Hook. 

September 16. New France was the 
name given to a settlement in the central, 
westerly portion of the present town of 
Farmlngdale (then a part of Hallowell). 
It extended two or three miles south- 
westerly from London Hill,and was reached 
by the road which now is known at its 
easterly end as Maple St. This road was 
accepted by the town in 1793, "agreeable 



to the minutes" takeiTby Ephraim Ballajd 
the same year. Thomas Davis, or D'Avls, 
son of John and Betsey Davis, was bom in 
Ingorville, France, January, 1762 ; he came 
to America in the French service during 
the revolution, and at the close of the war 
remained in this country and lived for 
awhile in New Hampshire. He came to 
ancient Hallowell in 1786 and began the 
settlement of New France, which was so 
called from his being a Frenchman. His 
wifb was Margaret Bnngongh of Pownal- 
• borough. They had six children of whom 
three were sons. The youngest was Thomas 
Jefferson Davis, who succeeded to the 
homestead which occupies a beautiful situ- 
ation about half a mile from the nearest 
road, the old road having been discontinued 
in part, many years ago. 



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326 HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 

1793. September 18. Ephralm got in part of oar cora ; had some youngsters 
to help him hask It. 

28. I was called at Ih. morn, to Mr. Daws at Capt. Car's. 

30. Mr. Ballard laying oat a landing at the Hook by Martin's. 

October 3. Son Town came for me at 2h. p. m. I went forward as soon 
as possible. Crost the ferry at 3 ; arived at son Town's at 7. My daughter 
was safe delivered of a son at 7h. 30m. 9th child. 

5. Returned home. Went to Doctor Colman's ; bot 1-2 lb. spermaseta at 
2 shillings : loz. dragon's blood, 1 shilling, 6 pence ; 2oz. of manna, 2 shillings ; 
1 uutmegg, 1 shilling. 

6. My son Jonathan was here; his family are exercised with this 
epidemical cold. 

7. Mr. Ballard went to survey for Colonel North. Mr. Gow and lady here 
at evening- 

9. Sunday. Mr. Ballard sett out for Canaan to do business for Mager 
Goodln. 

12. I was called to see Mrs. Daw who is in labour, at 8h. mom; she was 
delivered of a fine danghter — her 3d — at 11. I left her cleverly, at 6h. 
evening. 

13. Sunday. Clear and cool. Cyrus and Ephraim went to meeting at the 
Hook. 

14. Mr. Hodges' house was raised this day. 

16. I was called to James Moore's ; his wife unwell. 

17. Mrs. Moore is unwell, but consented that I should go to see Mrs. 
Lyon who was in labour, and was safe delivered at 8h. evening, of a daughter, 
and I returned to Mr. Moore's. 

18. Mrs. James Moore was delivered of a daughter at 6h. SOm. 

20. Sunday. Mr. Lee preacht at the Hook, but my family did not attend. 
Mr. Parker was here, afternoon ; exprest his desire that I should make his 
lady a visit soon. * I have read 2 of Doctor Price's discoarses this day. 

21. John Jones called here. Dolly gone to Mr. Wesson's. My sons are 
planking the seller where it fell in yesterday. I have made a cheese. 

24. Mr. Ballard returned Arom surveying for Mager Goodin. 

27. Sunday. Mr. Ballard and sons went to meeting. Mr. Turner 
performed. I was called at 8h. evening, to see Nathaniel Shaw's wife ; she 
was delivered at llh. 5m. of a son. 

September 30. Alfred Martin, black- Davenport's landing, —and diagonally 

smith, lived on the spot where Lowell hall across the river from Hinkley's point, 

now stands. He came from Connectlcnt October 9. Samuel Goodwin, the pioneer 

in 1798. The landing laid ont by Mr. Bal- settler of ancient Fownalboro. 

lard was near the foot of the Winthrop October 13. Rev. Jesse Lee preached in 

road, and became one of the termini of the the Hallowell Academy, 

principal ferry at the Hook. The other October 20. Rev. Jesse Lee, the evangel 

terminos was for awhile at the cove below of Methodism in Maine. 



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MKS. Ballard's diary. 327 

1793. October S8. I was called, afternoon, to Mr. Timothy Page's wife, 
who was safe delivered at the 7h. evening, her child was a son which weighed 
11 1-4 lbs. Birth 45th for this year, and 600th since I came to this country. 

29. A very severe snow storm, with a heavy wind from the north. I 
tarried at Mr. Page's this day and night. 

80. The ship which Pitt bailt was lanched this forenoon. 

81. Doctor Parker here ; left Augnstns 2 grns. tartar emitlc. 
November 8. The ordinance of the supper administered this day. 

6. A high S. £. wind and rain at night. The brig was laucht at the Fort. 
I have been at home prepareing for Thanksgiving. 

7. I was called at five o'clock, mom, to see Mrs. Read, who was safe 
delivered of a daughter at 9. I returned home at noone. 

8. The ship grounded near our landing, morn, and fluted and went down 
after sun sett. Rufhs Ballard here this day. Informs me that his sister Lucy 
was delivered of a son last weak, and is comfortable. 

9. Mrs. Parker had our hors to go and see the negro woman doctor. 

10. Sunday. Rev'd Mr. Turner dlscoarst ftom these words : '*God is a 
spirit." 

15. Mrs. Holdman [Holman] here to have a gown made. Mrs. Benjamin 
to have a cloak cut. Polly Bust after work. I was called to Mr. Parker's, 
afternoon. Mr. Ballard Is better. 

16. I was at Mr. Parker's and Colonel Sewall's. Mrs. Parker nnwelL 
Colman bled her at evening. 

17. Sunday. Rainy. I was called ftom Mr. Parker's at 2h. mom, to Mr. 
Poore's. Doctor Page was called before my arlval. I extracted the child — 
a daughter. He chose to close the loin. I returned home at 8h. morn. 
Received 6 shillings as a reward. 

18. At Capt. Meloy's; his hidy in labour; her women called. It was a 
severe storm of rain. Cleared of with snow. My patient delivered at 8h. 
5m., evening, of a flne daughter ; her attendants — Mises Cleark, Duttun, 
Sewall, and myself. We had an elligant supper, and I tarried all night. 

19. I returned home after dineing. Rev'd Mr. Tumer and Esquire Cony 
supt here. 

23. Mr. James Page here. Mr. Ballard paid him 6 shillings towards his 
tax. 

24. Esquire Coney called here; he has been to Join Mr. Smith and Nancy 
Cleark in marriage. 

26. Esquire Mathew Howard called me to see his lady who was delivered 
of a daughter, at 8h. 10m., evening. 

26. Mr. Ballard and sons bringing brick ft-om the Hook. 

27. Mr. Livermore's sons laying a hearth In our kitchen. The bridg 
acrost the gully was covered this day. 

28. Mr. Ballard gone to survey for Esquire Petingail. 

OdfcoberSO. The ship flamtfton, 227.70 November 6. Brig TA^rtw, 173.30 tons ; 

tons ; William Rtt, builder and owner, and William Robinson, builder and owner, and 
Thomas Farrell, master. John Rogers, master. 



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328 



HISTORY OP AUGUSTA. 



1793. December 1. At Mr. Parker's. 

6. I was called to Bei^jamiD White's at 2h. morn. Wrode in a sleigh. 

7. At Beujamin White's; bis wife was delivered at 12 o'clock of a 
daughter ; and I was called back to Mr. Parker's ; his lady was delivered at 
9h. 30m. of a daughter. 

8. Mr. Parker went for hisnura! I left his lady at 4 p. m., as well as could 
be expected, and walkt over the river. Wrode Mr. Ballard's horse home. 
I had a w restless night by fUting and weting my feet. 

9. Mr. Ballard surveying for Mr. Pollard and Page. I went to Mr. 
Pinny's and Benjamin's. Brot my woUen web yarn home, and went to Mr. 
Peter Clark's. They engaged to weav it. 

17. I was called at 6h. morn, to see Mrs. Hamlin; she was delivered of a 
daughter at 7h. and 20m. I spent the most of the day with her. Mr. 
Livermore laid a floor in our kitchen. 

19. This is theanneversaryof my marriage. 

21. Ephraim went to the meddow; put on a pair of new trousers. Mr. 
Ballard had a pair of new boots made at Beeman's. 

24. Mrs. Child a little easier. I was called to John Badcock's to see his 
wife, at Ih. p. m. ; shee was safe delivered of a daughter at 9. The Negro 
Doctres there. Mrs. Child had Doctor Cony with her this night. 

25. Mrs. Dickman's child expired yesterday mom. 
29. Re v'd Mr. Turner performed* • • 

1794. 

1794. January 1. My sons carrying wood to Mr. Beeman. 



Jannary 1. John* Beeman, son of John^ 
Beeman of Hartford, Ct., and Sarah 
Brooks, his wife, was bom in Nortbfield, 
Mass., Feb. 9, 1755 ; he came to the Hallo- 
well-Hook settlement in May, 1781. He 
was a tanner; he bnilt the large wooden 
building now standing on the pomer;of 
Central and Water streets on the north line 
of his lot extending from Water to Second 
street; his sonth line, mnning parallel, 
oonmiencing at Water street on the sonth 
side of the comer building on the sonth 
side of Central street, included the spot 
where the Universalist Church bailding 
now stands. That section of Central street, 
between Water aud Second streets, was not 
opened dnring his lifetime. His tannery 
was on the sonth side of his lot, a few rods 
westerly from Water street. He had a very 
large and excellent garden on the west end 
of his lot. He was a great reader, and was 
especially fond of scientific books. In his 
large kitchen, fashioned as in those times 
he had a fire-place to take in 4-feet wood ; 



in front of this stood a settle — a wooden 
bench about six fbetlong with a high back 
to break off the cold air from the back part 
of the room. In this cosy place, with a 
candle attached to the fire-jam he would 
spend the long winter evenings, poring over 
books of ancient history or scientific works. 
In the exciting political times of 1812, he 
was a zealous federalist, and many were the 
amusing scenes when he came in contact 
with an equally zealous democrat. He 
married March 20, 1785, Hannah, dan. of 
John Jennings and Hannah Newoomb, his 
wife. The Hallowell records give the names 
and dates of birth of ten of their children. , 
Their youngest child, John* Beeman, (b. 
Jaunary 24, 1810; d. November 20, 1874), 
was a merchant for many years in the build- 
ing erected by his father ; he was a man of 
kindly heart and jovial nature, a great 
reader of books, and a worthy and beloved 
citizen. He m. and left descendants. John^ 
Beeman d. March 1, 1827. 



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MBS. BALLARD'S DIARY. 329 

1794. January 7. Charles and John Cox and Patty Goodin here. 
8. Ephraim carried 19 bushels of ashes to Mr. Wesson. Received 3 shill- 
ings, 8 1-2 pence in cash, and 1 qaire of paper. 

11. I paid Doctor Cony this morning. 

12. Sunday. I was called to see Mrs. Benjamin, at 7h. evening. My patient 
at her father's, Mr. Savage's. Bakt mins pies at evening. 

18. My patient's illness came on and she was safe delivered at 7 evening, 
of a son. Mr. Bei^amin is absent. 

19. Sunday. Mr. Ballard, Cyrus and I attended a divine service at the 
Hook. Moses Springer and Lucy Norcross, Joseph White and Sally Hum* 
phrey Gardner, cryed the last time. 

20. Mr. Ballard went to Mr. Gaslin's to survey for him. 

' 24. Capt. Hersey called me to see his wife about day. We got safe over 
the river; the freshet rose and it broke up; his wife safe delivered at 7h. 
evening, of a daughter. All like to do well. 

25. At Capt. Hersey's ; he was seeking a nurs and transporting women 
home. 

26. I went to Mr. Parker's ; Judg Lithgow and Colonel Howard there. 

80. At Mr. Seth Williams'. He returned with James Bennet a prisoner. 

81. Mrs. Williams in travail, and was safe dellyered of a daughter at 7h. 
40m. evening. 

February 2. Sunday. Candlemas. Mr. Ballard only of my family attended 
worship in public. 

5. Cloudy and very windy. Son and daughter Town and their children 
left here, homeward bound. I fear they have sufered with the cold. 

0. Ephraim has sleighdcd wood to market this day. . ^ 

7. I was called early this mom to Eliab Shaw's ; his wife was safe delivered 
of a daughter at Ih. p. m., and I returned home. Wrode there and home on 
Samuel Braiey's slead. 

8. Mr. Ballard went to survey land for Mr. Gilley. I was called at 5h. 
evening, to see the wife of Sasson Butler at the Hook ; she was safe delivered 
of a daughter at 6h. 60m., and I tarried all night and nurst her. 

9. Doctor Ward and Patty Bullen cryed the first time. 

14. Dolly had her muff and tippit. 

15. Mr. Ballard went to Capt. Cokses to get a surveyor's compass mended. 

16. Sunday. I attended worship at the Hook, afternoon. Ephraim Bur* 
ges and Joanny Sewall cryed, Ist time. 

17. Mr. Ballard and Ephraim went to Mont Vernon for hay. 

18. Mr. Ballard at Mr. Nores', surveying. I was called at 7, evening, to 
Moses Sewal's wife in labour. 

January 19. Momb Springer (1769- owell and Boston ; he lived on lower street 
of Bowman's Point. See sketch of —near the foot of Heard's lane. His 



Moses Springer, Jr. wife was Susanna Young ; they had ten 

Febraaiy 8. Sarson Butler came to children. He died in 1842. 

Hallowell-hook from Martha's Vineyard. February 9. William Ward was the 

He was a packet master and sailed the earliest practicing physician at Norridge- 

sloop ^r»a<{/M many years between Hall- wock. 



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330 HISTORY OF AUGUSTA. 

1794. Febrnary 19. Mrs. Sewall was delivered of a fine daughter at 18m. 
past mldDlght, and is cleverly. 
20. I was called at llh. eveDlng, to Joseph Savage's wife. 

25. Mrs. Savage was safe delivered of a daughter at 2h. mom. 

26. Ephralm went to school to Mr. D. Livermore. 

27. I was called at Ih. p. m., to see Mrs. Swan ton who was delivered at 7* 
of a son, her second child. 

March 2. Mr. Ballard returned ftrom Vassalboro. Informs that Thomas 
Bobbins departed this life last evening sudenly. Mr. Seth Williams' daughter 
Betsy expired this night. 

5. Mr. Ballard attended the ftineral of Mr. Williams' child. 

6. I was called at llh. to see the wife of Mr. Boland Smith, who was in 
labour. I was there all night. 

7. Mrs. Roland Smith was safe delivered at 6h. p. m., of a fine son, and is 
as well as could be expected. 

9. Sunday. Was called out oT meeting in the first prayer to Mrs. Isaac 
Hardin ; she was safe delivered of a daughter at 5. I was conducted home by 
Mr. James Page. 

10. Mr. Ballard sett out to survey land for Rhuben Fairfield and others. 
Ephralm went as fkr as Mr. Benjamin Brown's to take our horse home again. 

13. Dolly went with others to the Hook as a spectator to their singing 
school. Mrs. Burton gave me a Kenester. Doctor Ward and Polly Bnllen 
married. 

16. Seth Hallowel and Tylor's daughter were publisht the first time. Rev'd 
Mr. Turner discoarst from Luke, 12 c. 15 verse. Beware of covetousness. 

io. I was called at 8h. mom, to see the wife of James Savage; shee was 
safe delivered of a fine son at Ih. p. m. I left her comfortable, and returned 
homeward as far as my son Jonathan's ; arived there at 7h. evening. 

21. I came home from my son's. The roads are bad. I walkt down the 
hill beyend Jones' mill. 

23. Sunday. Colonel Sewall culled me to his house. His lady is not very 
well. 

25. I was called flrom Colonel Sewall's to see Mrs. Morgin ; she was de- 
livered of a daughter at 4h. p. m. 

26. Called fk*om Colonel Sewall's to James Hinkley's, Junior's ; his wife 
was delivered at llh. evening, of a son, her first child. The wriding is very 
bad. The flreshet over the bridges at the Hook. 

29. At Colonel Sewall's. The river opened at the Fort. 

30. Sunday. At Colonel Sewall's. The people crost on the ice, fbrenoon. 
April 1. I was at Mr. Pierce's; his wife so ill that we called Mrs. Pollard 

and Savage. Jonathan's horse fell thro' the ice on the mill pond. 

2. Mrs. Pierce was delivered at lOh. morn, of a daughter, her first child. 

5. Mrs. Sewall called us up at Ih. this morn. Mrs. Pollard and Voce called 
at 6h. mora. Mrs. Sewall was delivered of a daughter before they got inn, 
•and is cleverly. Mr. Ballard called there and dined. 

March 7. Roland Smith was Hying at the Hook. See list of revolutionary soldiers of 

Augusta. 



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MRS. BALLARD'S DIARV. 331 

1794. April 9. Mr. Ballard and sons attended town meeting. They have 
divided this town into three parrishes. 

11. I was called by Moses Springer to see his lady. 

12. I was at Moses Springer's. His lady was delivered at 5h. 27m., mom, 
of a son. I left her and infant very comfortable, and returned home at llh. 

17. This is the day appointed for a fast. 

20. There was a Society meeting at the Hook. 

21. Mr. Ballard was np as far as Andrewse's; he had a hoase raised this 
afternoon. 

23. Mr. Ballard prepareing for his toar. 

24. Mr. Ballard went to Vassalboro. I was called to see the wife of 
Nathan Burges who was safe deliver6d at llh. of a fine son. Her husband is 
at sea, if living. A first bom. 

26. Mr. Ballard is gone to Mr. Thomase's ; a law salt there between Mr. 
Peter Parker and Colonel Sewall. I was called at 2h. evening, to see James 
Lenney*s "wife who was in labour, and was safe delivered at llh. of a daughter. 
Her husband was absent. 

27. Mr. Ballard left home at 8h. p. m., on a tour of surveying on Sandy 
river for this Commonwealth. May he be preserved and return in safety, is 
the prayer of me, his spouse. 

28. Sylvanus Moore, and others sett out to assist Mr. Ballard in his sur- 
veying. Cyrus went to take the horse home his dady wrode. 

May 1. Mr. Densmore put gargett into our cow's neck. 

2. I went to see Mr. Wesson who has had the mumps; he is mending. 
Came home, and sowed cabbage seed and summer savory. The wife of Daniel 
Bolton intered this day. I am informed of the death of Mrs. Hopkins ; Mrs. 
AUin, and Richard Moore's wife, and Joell Chandler. 

8. Mr. Wesson's vessel arived at the Hook this day. 

5. Mr. Beaman was here. Desired me to go and see his lady. Left his 
hors for me to wride. I went and dined with her. Went to see Mrs. Carr; I 
called to see Mrs. Flllebrown. I was at Mr. Fesandon's store ; at Jerry 
Burner's. Was called by Mr. Waid to see his wife who was in labour, and 
was safe delivered at lOh. evening, of a daughter. 

11. Sunday. Informed that Old Mr. Hamlen, a son and daughter, are 
arived, yesterday, lately from Oxford. 

18. Am informed that Mr. Ballard foand the snow 4 feet deep when he 
arived at the place of destination for beginlug his toar of surveying. 

14. My sons yoakt and ringed our piggs, and turned them out. 

15. Ephraim workt for Mr. Waid, forenoon. Is gone to see a phraim raised 
for Mathew Hayward, Esqr. 

16. My sons ploughed a piece on the north side of the gully. 

18. Sunday. S. Moore and J. Sturges came here this mora. Mr. Ballard 
returned at evening. They found snow 5 feet deep in their tour. 

April 9. The South, Middle, and North ford Square, opposite the janction of Orove 
parishes. and Green streets,— now the homestead of 

May 15. On the northerly side of Hart- Oeoiige N. Lawrence. 



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332 HI8TOBY OF AUGUSTA. 

1794. May 20. I am inforroed that the body of a young girl by the name of 
Tilton was found in the woods in Vassalboro. It is suspected that a Negro 
by the name of Edmond Fortis was the perpetrator. The coroner was called 
A:om this town. 

21. I was called to see Mr. Moses White's wife in labour. Edmond Fortis, 
a black man, was conducted to Pownalboro Jail, for committing a rape on 
Miss Tilton and afterwards murdering her on the evening of the 18th Inst. A 
most shocking sein which he has confest. He has a wife and 2 children. 

22. Mrs. White was delivered at 2h. mom, of her 5th daughter and 9th 
child. I left mother and child cleverly, at 7. 

23. I was called at 7h. morn, to see the wife of John Beeman in labour; 
she was delivered at lOh. of a son, l^r first son and 6th child. I left her at 7h. 
p. m., cleverly. 

27. Mr. Ballard is gone as an apprlser on the late Gov. Handcock's lands 
in this Eastern country. 

28. I have been working in my gardln part of the day. The worms do 
great damage in it. 

80. I was called to Mr. Densmore*8 twice this day, to see their youngest 
child who has swallowed some boiling hott coffee and is scalt in its mouth and 
throat. It seems easier at evening. 

June 1. I have been at home. James Sturg^ to Vassalboro. 

8. I was called by Peter Cleark, Junior, to see his wife who is unwell. 

4. Mrs. Cleark's illness came on so great, that her women were called and 
she was safe delivered at 8h. evening, of a son. 

6. Cyrus went to Winthrop for one-half dozen chairs for Dolly. 

8. Sunday. I was called to Mr. Phillip Norcrosse's wife who is in labour. 

9. Mrs. Norcross was safe delivered of a daughter at ih. 30m. mom. 

11. Jason Liverroore, Junior, had a fitt this morning at the Hook. 

12. John Houston expired at Sandy river. 

13. Mr. Ballard Is gone to Washington to survey for Mr. John Davis who 
removed from Hallowell to the farm which was owned by Doctor Williams. I 
have been to Mr. Livermore's. Old Lady Town deceast In May last. 

U. I was at Mr. Densmore's to see his daughter Dorcas who has a soar 
throat. We gave her cold water, root tea and a tae drops viteral. 

15. I covered my plants for fear of a Arost. 

16. A troat this morn. 

19. James Sturges had a brother called to see him Arom the westward. 

May 21. "Last Sunday evening [May aftdr a long search made by the neighbors , 
18, 1784] , as a young girl of fourteen years who from certain drcumstanoes, suspected 
of age, of